Wood carving

Many wood carvers among us? I've picked up some interest in relief-carving. BTW, be forewarned, it's another "slippery slope"!
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That it is. Buy a few Swiss Made gouges and a urethane mallet (the only good use of that plastic crap, other than suspension bushings) and go to work!
Swiss Made = Pfeil. Zimply Wunnerful tools. I have to sharpen them less than any other brand I have, which includes Marples, Lee Valley, Two Cherries (mostly good, but their hardness varies), and Robert Sorby (too hard, very chip-prone.)
I lost my passion for it when I found that most of the wood I'd bought for carving was hosed with bugs from the termites infesting my old house. I left most of it at the curb when I moved.
I have some duplicates in my collection of gouges. Let me know what you are looking for and maybe I can supply them to you at a much better price than your going out and buying them new.
I recommend a small set to get started with, then see what you need and buy individual tools to fill it out. I got my urethane Shop Fox mallet at Grizzly and absolutely adore it. I use it for installing new door frames, cabinet hinges, and such, too.
-- Progress is the product of human agency. Things get better because we make them better. Things go wrong when we get too comfortable, when we fail to take risks or seize opportunities. -- Susan Rice
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I picked up a set of 12 old gouges on Ebay recently for $150. 6 are Pfeil, the other 6 are German and English (Sheffield). None of them is very big (wide) but they are full size.
I picked up a 3/4" plank of Basswood and Butternut at a local wood carvers show.

Well, I am interested. Perhaps you can email me with what you're ready to part with (and whether they are the 8" or 10" models). I will figure out exactly what I have. I've got that "small starter set" you mentioned below! ; )

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Wow, you started out with a larger investment than I did. I found Dick Onian's book _Essential Woodcarving Techniques_ very helpful. And I rented some of the carving videos from the local library.
Writers to look for: Chris Pye, Mike Burton, both experts.

Bueno, bwana.

Strip the crip to email to me, then I'll have your email addy.

OK.
-- Self-development is a higher duty than self-sacrifice. -- Elizabeth Cady Stanton
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I don't know how many among us .... I'm at least one.
Check and see if your area has a woodcarving club. They're a great source for advice, guidance, and encouragement.

I've seen at least one good video on relief carving -- unfortunately the name escapes my aging brain, but I've found a few on You Tube.

and the end is never in sight.... There's always more gouges to buy.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yes, they are partially to blame for getting me into this. ;) I have found everyone I have met in wood carving to be very supportive.

Here's a very nice one by Ron Ramsey; he has a web site too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSPTZ-EBb5E

Personally, I'm most interested in relief-carving as ornamentation. I am particularly impressed by the carvings of the well-known Acanthus leaves. In fact, here's a whole book on carving them (it contains a nice bit of history on the matter and pictures, even if you never carve anything!):
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
IIRC, Google has many nice pictures/images too.
Bill

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Hungary has got quite rich history with wood carving. Well worth visiting if one is in Europe. I will be there for next 6 days and this site popped up when I was looking for possible places to visit in Budapest.
http://www.faragoszerszam.info /
Unfortunately the shop is located quite far from last metro station and propably won't visit it during this visit.
seismo malm
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I'm a woodcarver. Did a bit many years ago and never stayed with it. About 2.5 years ago I signed up for a free local class. I ended up joining the local carver's guild and am still there.
At the recent Artisty in Wood show (largest woodcarving show in America), I finally picked up a power carver. I've been mostly doing easy wood projects, but been wanting to try other materials. Going to try my hand at bone and stone. I'll be interesting to say the least.
Fortunately, I've managed to keep my carving tool inventory low, just a handful of knives. I've already gotten carried away with turning tools. This year I'm going to do more with the scrollsaw and carving. At least that's the plan. ;)
`Casper
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I'm late responding, I've been "away", so I'm catching up on threads.
I recently reviewed my options for doing some carving. I have a few tools, but I think I need a few more chisels, as per some books I've been reading. I haven't carved anything of relavence in a long time.
Bill, if you are the Bill in Indianapolis, you might check out your local carver's guild or Marc Adams School of Woodworking. Mary May will be conducting a class (fundamentals) at Marc Adams School in June, 2012. http://www.marymaycarving.com/woodcarving%20classes.htm
I vacation in NC about twice a year and I see she will conduct a class on the fundamentals of carving in Pittsboro. I may consider attending. I don't know what the costs may be, ..... yet.
I suppose any reasonable instructor is sufficient for learning basics, though.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

Yes, it's within driving distance. The cost is $755 for 5 days (which makes me pause), but I just checked and the class in July is already full! I've watched the episode of The Woodwright's Shop in which Mary May visits several times. Every time it comes around again I'm a little more savvy.
I picked up Yorburg's book on Acanthus carving so I'll have to try to figure it out myself this year. I've learned a great deal about relief carving in the last few months. Lotta art!
As a matter of coincidence, Wilburs, "Carving Architectural Detail in Wood: The Classical Tradition" arrived in my mailbox today.
The books are cheap; the gouges not so much...lol.

> Sonny
I agree! Besides woodcarving clubs, there are some fine books out there too!
By the way, if anyone would care to comment on how they adorn the apron's of his or her tables with woodcarving, or the equivalent, it would put a nice spin on this thead! : ) It occurred to me that I probably don't want to put "dust collector's" on the tops of tables.
Bill
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