Wobble Dado

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Yes, just like on a normal carbide tooth dado set however there is a lot of over lap rather than "just enough".

Yes
The flat center dial on the outer blade moves left or right. It is about 2.5" in diameter. When it is installed on the arbor the hub rests against the chipper and holds the blade different distances fron the chipper.

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Go here, http://www.freudtools.com/t-manuals.aspx Scroll to the bottom where the pdf for the dial dado set manual is.
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I think I get it. You're saying that teeth of the chippers overlap the cutting area of the outside blades which gives them an amount of adjustment without leaving any area of wood not reached by any teeth.
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wrote in message

Yes
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Upscale wrote:

In a nutshell, that appears to be the basic concept behind the "dial a width" dado stack.
Possibly something else going on when using only the two outer blades and negative clicks for <1/4" widths, but I've been too busy to analyze it.
Magic?
...who cares! :)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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That's as good a recommendation as one would need. You're talking about that new-fangled dial/stack thingamajig?
Yeah, It is not cheap but it makes a standard dado set look kinda plain. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote:

When I got a stacked dado coupled with a 6" dial caliper, thought I'd just left the stone age.
BTW, it wasn't cheap either, but worth the investiment, IMHO.
Can't imagine what the feeling with this widget would be.
Lew
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That is what "I" still use, I make a test cut and measure the width of the cut with the caliper. then I addd the differnece with shims. It works pretty good but not having to putz with shims and get repeatable results is pretty cool.

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"Leon" wrote:

One thing I figured out in a hurry was to make a "record" piece to document the width and depth of cut.
Found this to be of particular value when doing half laps or similar joints that are material thickness related.
Run all the material for a section (top, sides, whatever) thru the planer before starting the job.
Makes life a lot easier IMHO.
Lew
Lew
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On Mon, 22 Jun 2009 07:34:06 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Got to agree with you. Several months ago, I donated a RAS to my church camp since it was taking up needed space and got little usage. Now it seems like every project has something that could be done better with the RAS. Wonder if they'd give it back.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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wrote:

Based on the glowing recommendations in this thread, I sprung for one of the Freud SD600 "Dial-a-Width" dado sets (20% off from Rockler). Tried it out today. It cuts a beautiful dado and width adjustments are a breeze.
Ran into a little problem taking it off the arbor after the first use. When I installed it, tightening down the arbor nut pushed all the blades together like they should be. Don't know if my TS arbor is slightly oversized or the arbor holes in the chippers are slightly undersized, but I thought I was going to have to use a gear puller to get that last chipper off the arbor. Finally worked it loose with judicious use of thin wedges and a dead blow hammer. No problem removing the outer blades and chippers, the ones that ride the arbor threads, but that last chipper that rides on the non-threaded part of the arbor acted like it was held on by an interference fit.
Could have been paint inside the arbor hole. After cleaning out the holes in the chippers to bright metal, and using a loop of sandpaper to polish the arbor - real precision metalworking - the chippers slide on and off without insurmountable difficulty. The outer blades didn't present any problem at all.
So my advice to anyone who gets one of these (or any stacked dado set, for that matter) is to mount each blade and chipper singly and individually before you mount the stack. Make sure the blades/chippers will slide all the way to the inner flange without interference. Might save you some problems getting them off after the arbor nut forces too small a hole over too large an arbor.
My other dado set mounted and dismounted without any problem at all. With it, the problem was those durn shims catching in the arbor threads. At least I won't have to deal with that aggravation anymore.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

To answer your question: No, there is nothing you can do. To resolve your need for an accurate dado:Buy a stack dado.
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Larry Kraus wrote:

Well, if we're going to spend Puckdropper's hard-earned cash, then I think he should be using a high-precision CNC router, which'll produce flat-bottomed (or profile-bottomed) dados, stopped-dados, curvy dados, zig-zag dados, circular and elliptical dados,...
...as well as mortises, tenons, finger joints, half-blind dovetails, normal dovetails, bear's ears, double-helix balusters, and sink cutouts.
I have and use both. :)
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I always find the "you can't do it" aspects of this forum quite helpful. Coupled with the "you must buy more tools", it must be encouraging to those without limitless funds to find their situation has been declared hopeless by the experts. Certainly, giving up is an option as well, right?
Puck - when I couldn't afford a stacker when I was starting in the trades, we used a wobbler due to its speed of cutting. And while you could get carbide tipped dado wobblers, you couldn't get carbide tipped router bits that were any good. So we were stuck with wobblers for making site built cabinets. This wasn't the problem some would make it.
Set the old wobbly up as close as you can, then use a pencil to make reference marks on the hubs (both side) and blade (both sides). Test. Open up or close as needed to get the perfect thickness you want. Granted, it takes patience, but you have a tool that works well within it means. That translates that all precision must come from you.
After you get the width cut to you satisfaction, take an awl or sharpened ramset nail and scratch into the metal your personal reference points. (BTW, the ones on the hub are accurate within about 1/8" or so, give or take 1/4", so I would use them too much!).
I have an old one in my shop that was from +/- 1975 that has scratches for 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" plywood for shelves.
My complaint with the wobbler end product was that the same as Leon's above, that bottoms weren't really smooth and flat once you got to the wider limits of cutting capacity. However, an ultra sharp 1/2" butt chisel cleans up the cuts in seconds. However, unlike Leon, I didn't have depth cut problems; the brand of dado I used could easily be set for depth, but it cut the correct depth on the outsides of the dado leaving little tracks inside the cut itself. The difference could be different makers or models from the same makers. Leon's point addressed the only downside I saw in the field.
While I heard of wobblers going out of adjustment while in use, mine (all 3-4 of them were purchased at Sears somewhere between '75 - '80) never did. I don't think the boys tightened them properly, as in not enough.
If you want to use what you have, that tool will serve you fine with the proper setup. While it certainly isn't as elegant or as easy a solution as the $150 sets, you can get it where you want to go with some patience.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well said (see my initial response) and with more patience than I could muster. I'm still using the Sears wobbler I bought back in the 70's to use with my RAS, mostly for straight tenons - and I still like it for that job.
I had a small tongue-in-cheek sign in my lab office back then that applied to my woodworking as well:
"We have done so much with so little for so long that we are now qualified to build absolutely /anything/ with nothing."
I'd still rather puzzle out how to get the job done with a tool I already have or build a new tool using the old ones than go out and buy another.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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wrote:

*sound of sarcasm meter hitting the pin* LOL
[snipped for brevity]

Absolutely. A wobbler isn't a topofthefrickinline tool, but it does the job. They only get a bit sloppy when used wide open and a bit grabby when cutting rough stuff like oak cross-grain.
[again snipferized to accomplish that ever-sough-after- brevitization]

The Voice-Of-Reason strikes again <G>
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<snip>

*Patience*, a virtue I often find in far too short a supply.
Tried a wobbler, thing scared the devil out of me, so resorted to nibbling with a standard blade until I bit the bullet and got a stacked dado.
Lew
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wrote:

I have a nice $$ Freud dado but I find that 80 - 90% of the time I use a router for dadoes. Quicker set-up. Cleaner dadoes.
Max
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"Max" wrote:

The next time you need to cut 8-10 dadoes, 16"-20" long, for one job, you may look at things a little differently.
Router cut dadoes are nice for small jobs, but not for serious work IMHO.
Lew
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I don't agree with all of that. My experience last summer cutting a number of dados for the picnic table I built put the tablesaw with dado blade at about a quarter of the time needed to set up the router and then set it again for a different depth. This was especially evident when I was sneaking up on a particular depth. The hand held router also made for much finer dust that went everywhere. Might have been different with a table mounted, vacuum assisted router, but I don't have one.
Cleaner dados? Ok, can't argue with that, but definitely not quicker.
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