Wiring up electric motor for shop sander

Hi All,
I've picked up an electric motor in a garage sales, its a Emerson, model K55HXDPZ-7023 HP 3/4, volt 115, RPM 1075/4 speed, pt. no. 51-25023-01
All I want to know is how to wire it up to a standard 3-prong electic cord. I want to use it for my shop built thickness sander.
The schematic on the motor defines the wires as follows (two browns): Brown - cap. Brown - cap. white - common black - high speed blue - medium high speed yellow - medium low speed red low speed
My 3-prong cord has white, black and green. If I do white to white, and black to black (assume high speed), where does green go? And what do I do with the other wires ... tape them off? What about those brown capacitor wires?
Actually, what I tried was white to white, black to black, and I screwed the green onto the housing. When I plug it in it just made a loud hum and did not spin.
What configuration would give the best torque for sanding abilities?
Appreciate any and all comments. Thanks.
Cheers, Eric
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Uhhhh, dunno cause I aint real good with motors, but I would think the hot wire of your cord should go to one of the browns of the capacitor, then the other brown from the capacitor would go to your black, blue, yellow or red. I would say it's a starting capacitor and HAS to be on line, or in line, to make it work. Might want to wait for others to chime in.
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BTW, Why not get a multi switch or something like that to run all four speeds? I'm guessing you could find one somewhere. I'd like to see some pictures of this sander when you get done. How much you got tied up in it already?
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Hi Jerry,
I'm building the sander from the Moritz design website. http://www.moritzdesigns.com/sander/sander.html All's going well, if I could just get the motor wired up. I will give some of the tips below a try. I'm taking pics of the progress, so will put them on my site later; I'll try and remember to send you a note. I've spent about $150 so far and nothing else really to get, unless that capacitor thing ends up costing more than a few $, if it's needed.
Thanks, Eric

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Eric, Fantastic! I just looked at and saved the site. Please keep me informed as to how it's going. Remove the NOSPAM and mail me directly if you would. You've got my interest peaked!
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More years ago than I care to relate, I worked for my father's appliance store. First as one of the delivery guys, then as a repair man.
If memory serves, a number of the motors {on washing machines and air conditioners - the ones that weighed about 150 pounds !!} had a 'Start' capacitor, AND a 'Run' capacitor. I would guess you have one of these.
Take a look in your local telephone book. Look up 'Motor Rewinding' or 'Rebuilding'. Stop in and ask nicely {a quart of coffee and a couple of doughnuts are a nice gesture}. I'll bet you'll get a nice lesson on 'Practical Electrics'.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
SNIP

SNIP What about those brown capacitor wires?
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On 25 Feb 2004 15:44:34 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Eric) wrote:

You need a 'motor start capacitor' across the brown wires... I don't know the value for that motor, but typical values are 10mfd@370vAC . You'll have to ask others...

green is usually case ground.

You're lucky it didn't burn!!

get a 4 position switch to select speeds...

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Oooops, sorry Bob, I didn't refresh before I told him about a switch. I just did and saw your post. Sorry.
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wrote:

No problem! The guy should have tried to get the switch with the motor, some of them can be wired up pretty fancy... changing poles from 4 to 6 and who knows what...
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51-25023-01 is the Rheem OEM PN assigned by Emerson, cross references to an Emerson 5463 motor the spec sheet says 15 ufd as said 370 V is about right. Believe the brown wires are the starter windings I think it wires as follows Black hard connected to 1 brown and black switched to either one of the speed wires white connected to negative of capacitor Positive of capacitor to the other brown
Try this link http://www.engin.umich.edu/labs/csdl/ME350/motors/ac/induction/1-phase/index .html
Scroll down to Permanent-Split Capacitor Motors Good luck

the value for that motor, but typical values

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Connect the white wire to neutral, the black to the 120 volt line. The green ground connects to the motor frame.
Get a capacitor and put it across the two brown leads. Its value in microfarads should be about 2650*current draw (in amperes)/line voltage (120 volts). The voltage rating of the capacitor should be at least 200 volts or greater. It may see about 160 volts when the motor gets up to speed.
For Emerson the "K" denotes a permanent split capacitor winding.
RB
Eric wrote:

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