Wiring for 220V

Not a big electrical type, is there a common plug used for 220V machines? While walking the aisle at HD, I noted many different style plugs that can go on the end of a line cord. I pulled the receptacle out of the 220V service in the garage that was dedicated for an electric clothes dryer and need to choose the right receptacle as well. I'm gonna rewire all my tools for 220V.
KC
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You can't just rewire a 115V unit for 220....
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. http://www.autodrill.com http://www.multi-spindle-heads.com
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Sure you can. Most machines, the ones I have in particular are prewired for 115V. Instructions to change over are included with machine.
message

machines?
can
and
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Kind of depends on how you define "machine". It's usually the higher-powered motors that can be switched over, in my experience. Some tablesaws, dust collectors, bandsaws, jointers, etc. But benchtop planers, drill presses, etc are not, nor are most routers, drills, hand sanders...
Clint

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planers,
Yep. Sorry for the lack of clarification there. Many larger units can be wired to either... As can most Computers with teh flick of a switch in the back, etc. But... A hand drill, small drill press, etc. will probalby not have the ability to receive 220V.
When I read the original post and it's context to plugs, it sounded like the end user was simply taking one plug off, switching to another and expecting his new 220V wiring to work. My mistake for assuming! Sorry...
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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No, you can't. Unless it was intended for 110/220. Most stationary power tools are. Most portable tools are not.
rhg
Joe AutoDrill wrote:

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On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 13:35:46 -0500, "Joe AutoDrill"
well, you CAN, but I wouldn't advise plugging them in after the rewiring.. *g*

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On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 13:35:46 -0500, "Joe AutoDrill"
ALL 115v tools will run on 220v.
Some will do it more than once. <G>
Barry
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I guess I wasn't clear in my original question. I have several machines, jointer, bandsaw and tablesaw that CAN run off 220V. That is a fact, not a guess. I'm not talking about a drill motor, circular saw or any other hand tool. The question was, with the many different styles of plugs/receptacles; which is the right one to use.
Thanks to Greg, I think I've figured it out.
KC
wrote:

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On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 21:43:41 GMT, Ba r r y

^^^^
You misspelled FEW, Barry.
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The most common is probably the NEMA 6-15 or 6-20. The good thing is there is a receptacle that will take both. You are looking for the 240v 20a with one slot sideways "T" shaped.
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Not as "common" as 110/115/120V plugs. NEMA 6-20P and NEMA 6-30P seem to cover most of the more common woodworking machines you or I'd own.

tools
In a nutshell - you determine the amperage requirements for the tool and then choose the plug appropriately.
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