wiring - can this be done

Page 1 of 2  
Here is how I want to power my TS/router workstation.
A switch(A) near the front of the TS that will turn on the shop-vac outlet(C). A second switch(B) on the other side near the router that will also power the shop-vac outlet(C). This is easy enough using 3- way switches to power the outlet(C) but I also want the switch near the router(B) to control an outlet for the router(D).
Can this be done with with standard 3-way or 4-way switches or am I stuck with having an additional switch for outlet D?
Access is not a problem and I can power the circuit from any point.
I'd rather not use one of those relays for this purpose because I want to be able to turn the router on & off via a switch outside of the enclosed cabinet.
Any ideas?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Limp Arbor wrote:

Well, if you absolutely positively gotta do it with switches and switches alone, and you want one of them to power the shop vac outlet and the router at the same time, then you need what's called a "double pole double throw switch". One side can be connected like an ordinary 3-way switch, the other you connect to the router. A Leviton 1282 for 60 bucks or so is one example, that looks like an ordinary wall switch. If it doesn't have to look like an ordinary wall switch, http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=EG1528-ND or http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name60-1929-ND should do the job.
If you don't want to be fancy about your wiring, though, using one of these http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/SearchDetail.asp?productID ™21 and one of these http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00924031000P?vName=Tools will have the shop vac turn on any time you power up either the router or the table saw. Then you can use whatever kind of switch you want on the router table--as long as it draws power through the auto switch the vacuum will be operated by it. Note--the auto switch doesn't have a way to just turn on the shop vac--to do that plug in a power strip instead of the y-cable and plug a lamp or something into one of the outlets--when you turn on the lamp the vacuum will come on.
Be aware though, that for any of these solutions, a 3 hp router and big shop vac can overload a 15 amp circuit--I've popped breakers several times with that arrangement. Using the same componets as above, add a contactor from Grainger (http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/4DD05 for example) and actuate it off one of the auxiliary outlets, connect a plug and socket to it, and you can then run the shop vacuum off a separate circuit.
Note by the way that most switches are not designed for motor loads and using a typical wall switch to turn a motor on and off may kill the switch prematurely.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My spiffy Fein vac has an auto switched outlet built in, and here's the part that cracks me up. They say it's rated for 2000 watts or up to 18 amps.
1) The vac has a 5-15 plug 2) The vac motor is rated for 10 amps
So just how exactly am I supposed to get 28 amps into this thing?
And for the OP, just get yourself a Long Ranger remote and be able to turn on the shop vac anywhere without having to change any wiring at all.
-Kevin
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 5, 10:48 am, snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

I strongly agree! The Long Ranger is the most simple solution and it's cost effective when you consider the extra wiring and specialized switches need to implement your plan. Plus, it will be extremely easy to use, which is really the most important thing.
The Long Ranger "fob" has a short chain and spring clip that you can attach to shop apron or whatever. I'm a jeans and t-shirt guy, so I just clip it to a front belt loop. It dangles right by my front pocket. The chain is short enough that there's no problem with it being in the way.
THis is by far the superior solution without spending quite a bit of extra money.
Tom
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I bought mine, it came with two fobs. I velcroed one to the table saw and the other to the band saw. That makes my dust collector accessible from two different parts of my shop. Staggering the turn-ons has meant I don't have to worry about popping breakers.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 7 Jan 2009 06:29:36 -0500, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote:>

My only regret to the Long Ranger is that I should have bought it many years ago. I got the 240v version to control my PennState 1.5HP DC.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

.
I 2nd the Long Ranger acquisition!
I ppd getting one for years. Dumbest choice I've made. I got one last Christmas for myself - best present ever (please don't share this with the rest of my family!). IMO - if you have a dust collector, and you have any sort of piping system - even if it's 2 drops -get the Long Ranger. I got mine from Amazon (made by PSI) for $50 or close. I just toss the remote in my pocket. I have a 1.5hp DC, but wired it 220v. Later I can upgrade and keep the LR. I've designed a central sysem with very short runs and gates near or right on each tool. You need short runs with a 1.5HP unit and you need 6" lines. My TS, jointer, BS, and miter box will be no more than 12' from the DC.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 7 Jan 2009 09:54:08 -0800 (PST), coloradotrout

The exhaust extractor in my brother's auto shop is a similar application. I wired it with low voltage pushbuttons and a "galloping ghost" type relay. Energize onece, it's on. Energize again, it's off. It has a 3 watt red light to indicate when it is on, and a pushbutton (doorbell switch) at each exhaust connection.
If he had a remote control setup the guys would be constantly loosing them or backing over them with vehicles or creapers.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phisherman wrote:

I have the magnetic switch version for the DC, and use my older 120v version for my HVLP turbine.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What sort of controller do you have for a mag switch ???
I have a larger Delta unit and it has the mag switch but I wasn't aware of a remote solution.
B A R R Y wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Barber wrote:

PSI sells a Long Ranger built into a mag switch. The receiver simply pulls up the switch. With some effort, the same could be done by disassembling a plug-in model.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Barber wrote:

I forgot... Part # LR-2244
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks... I'll take a peek
B A R R Y wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What sort of DC are you using this on ???
B A R R Y wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Barber wrote:

JDS 3100-CK
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

Yep, if you don't insist that the vac come on when you power up the router, that's really the way to go.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 5 Jan 2009 15:57:03 +0000, J. Clarke wrote
<erudite stuff>
methinks staggering the startups, as in separate switches, would lessen the load on the breakers significantly. The combined s.u. current drawn by several motors kicking in at the same time may be WAY over the continuous rating but staggering them would obviously stagger the peaks too.
Thinking something like a hooded foot switch with first and second "progressive" presses or a noise-activated switch firing up the DC when the router etc. kicks in.
I know I'm rambling.. Just ideas. I'll leave the engineering to the clever folk.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Good point. I hadn't planned on involving the TS motor in any of this convoluted setup just a switch near the front to turn on the vac. The vac and the router coming up to speed at the same time could be a problem I might want to avoid. Maybe the Long Ranger or just 2 switches at the router are a way to go.
By the way I'm sure one of you has heard why the Lone Ranger killed Tonto... . . . . . . . . . . . . That's right, he found out what kimosabe meant.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Limp Arbor wrote:

Spend $40 for a Long Ranger remote.
I LOVE my $20 Craftsman auto-switch for sanders, hand-held routers, and my biscuit cutter, with the Shop-Vac, but a big router or table saw might be too much for one 120v circuit.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.