Wiring a workshop in Canada I need a good book or two.

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I have the code book simplified and it's pretty straight forward but the problem is I have never wired. I need a good up to date book that shows how to hook up A to B. The little details that make up the work. Some tips on the best layout for a small shop (14x20) would be nice as well. I know I want as many plugs as I can get in here. I also would like a nice panel of switches (6-8) at the door that allow me to turn off stuff like compressor, air purification, dust collection, fans, lights, etc as I leave. I'm putting in electric heat (simple overhead construction heater) as well so need some advice on 220 as well. I may convert my tablesaw to 220 as well. Please don't tell me to talk to an electrician. I can't afford one and living in a tiny community doesn't help. If I can't do this on my own it's not going to get done. The electrical inspector is a great guy and has offered to make an extra visit or two to help me out.
I'm a very quick study for most things, it's just that I have never had to do much electrical.
Ralph Morsby
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Well I'mnot sure how helpful this will be but when I wired my shed I used a book by "Creaive Homeowner" called Quick Guide Wiring, 3rd Edition. ISBN 1-880029-83-9. I can't remember where I got it but it might have been the BORG. The price was $7.95 (slightly higher in Canada).
It is pretty basic an covers all the usual stuff. I liked the fact that it had pretty good illustrations.
Also, if you live in a small community is there any chance that there is someone else there who has done their own wiring and can lend you a hand?

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Yep, two neighbors offered to help, both did their own wiring. Neither got it inspected. Both told me I didn't need the plastic vapor barrier liners behind my boxes. I decided at that point they weren't going to be all that helpful.

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Your local Public Library should have good books on wiring. Also try Home Depot or Rona. Des

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Fourteen years old.

I've seen books, but no idea how good they are. I would like to know the book is up to date and accurate before I put out $30-40. The one book Home Depot has I was told by the head of their electrical department that it was junk.
Rona has none.
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wrote:

The basic principals of "hooking A to B" has not really changed in the past 14 years. Best thing to do would be to check out an old book to show the basics then buy a code book to make sure everything is to code.
Nate
-- http://www.NateTechnologies.net:8000
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I'm trying to find the very best UP to date book.
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Having been there- done that, twice in five years I offer the following.
Instead of installing a 6 or 8 circuit panel, buy what's called a 'fastpak'. Local Homedepot have them. Consists of the panel, 100A main brkr,and enough other brkrs to wire up a minimum house.Room for 24 circuits. Yes, overkill, but price is BETTER than small panel and breakers. Go figure. I did the math. You'll need more circuits later,trust me. I used 21 of the 24 breakers for just the kitchen reno.5 splits for the counter,3 for lighting, fridge,stove,wine cooler,etc all have separate breakers. Have NOT had any of them trip yet. If your house has breakers, buy the 'fastpak' that has the same mfr of breakers. Allsow common spares for 'upgrades'. See I told you, you'ld need more cirsuits !!
jay
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Your best bet is to get two books:
A relatively good "how to wire" book to teach wiring techniques. Don't worry too much about "up to date" (or even Canadian code applicability), because the techniques have changed little.
Because frankly there's not much in the way of Canadian-specific technique books, "up to date" or otherwise.
Then you must buy a copy of Knight's "<provincial> electrical code simplified".
Available almost everywhere, kept up to date, and < $15.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Chris. The original poster already told us he has the "Electrical Code Simplified" book for the province in which he resides.
Rob
-----------------------
"Chris Lewis" wrote ...

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Oops. Missed that.
In that case, _any_ North American "how to" wiring book will do for discussion of "how to strip wire" etc. Ie: the Sunset books, Reader's DIgest DIY book etc.
Just ignore it for the code rules, and rely on Knight always.
As a FYI, Fine Woodworking and Better Homes and Gardens: Wood do have articles on workshop wiring and suggested setups. Again, rely on Knight for rules.
In fact, this group has lots of cool suggestions on how to set things up too.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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On 2 Mar 2004 04:11:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) scribbled:

Listen to Chris, he wrote the FAQ on electrical wiring before Al Gore invented the internet. Chris, how come you don't post it to rec.woodworking anymore?
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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On 2 Mar 2004 04:11:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Striping wire I can do. I have to install a new panel in the shop - 60 amp. I can't even figure out what type of box. Or what is required to get it wired to the main box in the house. Then I have to run one 220 circuit off that.
Most books I've seen get really complicated when you start installing 220.

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Most books don't cover subpanels, period.
If you're this far back on the learning curve, I suggest hiring an electrician to install the subpanel, and then you do the rest. There are a lot of fiddly details (backer boards, grounding, etc), and some of the components will be moderately expensive, so mistakes have major consequences.
You may be able to finesse it, ie: buy the components and drill the feeder cable holes from the electrician's instructions, and pay him hourly rate for the instructions and to connect it.
The most time-consuming part is installing the feeder cable.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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On 2 Mar 2004 14:38:16 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

I'm not looking for most books, I'm looking for one that does.<g>

How do you learn?

Did you read my first post?
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I don't know of any that do in the detail you want. It's not usually considered DIY.


Take a course or follow an electrician around. The orange book will tell you most of what you need to know in terms of rules, but not at the tutorial level you seem to need.


I just went back and read it to be sure. Yeah.
That's why I suggested finessing it.
When we had ours done, that's what I did.
I was responsible for getting the trench done. As soon as it was dug[1], he came over, drilled the holes in the masonry (I paid for the drill by giving the electrician a case of beer to give to the friend who he borrowed it from), dropped the cable in the trench, fastened the subpanel up on the wall, installed the conduit boots and connected the ends. Took less than two hours.
Got the inspection, then I filled the trench back in.
A few days later, he returned, and we wired up the rest of the garage (about 18 circuits at that point) working together. Pleasant afternoon, good company. Learned some tricks of the trade...
$200 labour plus a case of beer plus materials (subpanel + 18 branches) plus the $100 to get someone else to dig the 100' trench.
Now, that was somewhat special circumstances (he's now a friend of ours and business was _real_ _slow_ at the time). But if you limit it to the (smaller) subpanel, you should be able to do as well if not better. Ie: buy the subpanel the electrician suggests from your planning meeting, and mount it where and how he tells you.
It pays to tie into the local old-boys network.
[1] "As soon as" is the operative word. The sand here is infamous for collapsing. Got the trench dug, the machine operator said "oh-oh, it's caving in already", and I was on the phone to the electrician "we gotta lay the wire now!" within minutes ;-)
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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On 2 Mar 2004 16:18:45 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

I don't need a trench. All my wiring remains in a building.

The local old boy network in my community of 1000 are considered to be crooks by everyone of my neighbors. From the furnace guy to the gas fitters. If you don't want to be cheated you get someone from 100 miles away. Do you know what that costs? So the local boys charge you the same price.
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Ralph. I didn't realize you were planning on putting in a sub panel... I was going to do likewise, and found two good sources of info:
The first is a book called Wiring Installation and Maintainance (Home, Cottage, Industry), by Harold B. Kirchner. My copy dates from 1978, but there have been more recent editions. As I understand it, this has long been a standard text in Canada. It is excellent - the best book on electical I've ever seen. I love that they include plenty of example circuit diagrams. When I wired my first shop, I had this book nearby at all times.
My second source of info is a website: http://home.earthlink.net/~sonnypie/subpanel.htm After reading that site, top to bottom, I had a much more complete picture of what's involved in putting in a subpanel. The guy who posted it knows his stuff.
And you already know about the "electrical code simplified" books...
As I said, I was going to do my own subpanel installation, but I lucked out and found an electrical who specializes in this sort of thing. The guy has a good reputation and reasonable rates. Too bad you don't have anyone near you that you could rely on.
Good luck with your project.
Rob
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I'm trying to get out of installing the sub panel. My shop is actually attached to my home so technically I should need one if I don't install electric heat. I can however run a separate 240 cable for a plugin and use a construction heater that is plugged in not hard wired. I have plenty of room in my main panel. So I may be able to avoid the subpanel and just run 4 20 amp circuits and one 30amp circuit for the heater. This would be my preferred method because this I understand.

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Well, silly question here. If you understand running your circuits to a main panel, why don't you understand putting in a sub? The only difference is your pulling an extra wire, the feeder wire.
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
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