Wiring a new shop

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Steve
2? ton split unit. Smallest split unit I could locate. Forgot the brand. Only 13 SEER. Shop for the most SEER. I really pays off and the higher SEER units are usually better built. I have a a friend now who will find me what I want were I need to do it again.
I installed it myself and had the refrigerant lines soldered/done by a AC technician. He does them everyday.Shop for what you want. It is out there. I also made sure I got a 220 unit.
Bob AZ
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wrote:

If one gets sold too low of a SEER rating, are they a SEER sucker?
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
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Bob AZ wrote:

All the units I've found on-line are 13 SEER. I found one at 14 SEER that's about $300 more than the others.

One on-line vendor claims it's illegal for someone who is not EPA-certified to mess with refrigerants - is that true?

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Steve wrote:
> One on-line vendor claims it's illegal for someone who is not > EPA-certified to mess with refrigerants - is that true?
These days, yes.
Has to do with protecting the ozone layer.
Checked the price of 12 or 22, if you can even find it.
Lew
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wrote:

Keep looking. Go to 15 SEER, and take a $300 tax credit to offset the cost. make up the rest over a couple of years with energy savings. I think a shop AC qualifies if it is at the same address as your home, but you may need to check that.
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=products.pr_tax_credits#s2
Frank

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My 2 cents FWIW:

Asside from your noted exceptions (DC&AC), no they do not. My lathe, jointer and BS share. The BS is 2HP and the Jointer is 1.5 and I can still run them at the same time on a 20 amp breaker. I have not had them both "under load" simultaniously through.
How big 20 or 30

I wired all my 220 with 10ga, just in case I ever install a 5HP something.
Do all 220 machines operate at the same amperage or use the same

Most machines don't even come with a plug, you get to put on anything you like. So long as it is rated for more than your machine, you're OK. Some folks insist on twist-lock... I happen to think it's overkill except when it's there is a specific pull-out hazzard

I put it in (below) the floor, but that does seriously limit your options later on. I'm glad I did, but in my 20x25 shop, there was exactly one place I was going to put the stationary TS. With 30x30, I wuld imagine that you put a higher premium on flexibility.

I think that makes sense.... all this discussion about the ergonomic hight of an outlet seems to skim over the fact that there alot of devices that seldom get unplugged (prill press), and then there are things like a palm sander which is in and out all the time. I guess it depends on how you work. I have all of my recepticals low and it does not create any problem for me. That's because I have power strips just below counter height at each of my workstations. Smaller portable tools et plogged into the ergonomically placed strips, and the stationary tools and the power strips plug in down low where the cords are out of the way.

For a 220 machine, that depends on the amperage draw. Since you will likely have to assemble/attach cords for these machines, so just make exactly what you need/want in length and pass on the extension cord. I was able to get some really nice 12 gauge cord stock from the local electrical supply that was really nice: thick, plyable rubbery insulation for a very reasonable price.
> 5. Type of wiring. 12/3 or 10/3? Would you wire the 110 with the same?

220 - 10/3...just in case you need it some day. 110V... no reason to go beyond 12/3 as there's not much out there that will draw more than 15 Amps (continuously) that runs on 110V.
-Steve
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We've had that discussion here before. :-)
There's *no* reason to use 3-conductor cable for 240V power tools. It's just unnecessary expense. Three-conductor cable is needed for combined 240/120 loads such as a range or a dryer, that have 240V heating elements and 120V motors and/or control circuits. A power tool with a 240V motor needs only two-conductor cable; there isn't even anything to attach the third conductor to, if it's present.
If you want to plan for "in case you need it some day" it's better to not run cables at all, but instead pull individual conductors through conduit: pull what you need now, now; pull what you need later, later.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I have seen (but _very_ few (well, actually, precisely two :) ) --don't know of any current-day that do) a couple of planers that used that as well -- the main feed/cutterhead motor was 220V while the table lift and an auxiliary sharpening attachment were 110V. Fella' in a shop in VA had them. But certainly I'm unaware of anything currently on the market set up that way.

That's not bad advice, either... :)
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Well, yes, as always, the requirements of any specific tool or appliance trump "general rules". Interesting, though -- I didn't know anything of the sort had ever been produced. Wonder if some of that might have been aftermarket mods?

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I believe these were factory jobs -- I've wished more than once I had "bought'en" :) one of them from Eddie when he was selling them as he was enlarging his shop, but $500 was a _lot_ of money back then and I was just out of school so the $150 for the small shaper and 6" Rockwell jointer was all I could manage at the time.
As I recall, everything looked to match and the controls were all integral to the machine so I don't think it was an add-on. But I was young and pretty new to stuff at the time so didn't stick w/ me what they really were. Somebody long gone from the business now, I'm sure. They were a nondescript gray, darker than Rockwell so no real clue to try to match up like a recognizable PM green or some such.
He said he had bought'en them from a factory auction somewhere in PA -- they had had a production line of 25 of them -- 5 rows of 5 in line. Started at one end w/ rough stock, came out at the other with their surfaced/thicknessed stock for the sawyers on the other. They had replaced the 25 machines/50 employees with 2 large planers and a wide belt sander and five guys. About 1969/1970 when I met Eddie by answering his classified ad. He had had the machines 2-3 years at that point. I'd guess they were at least 20 years old if a day, probably closer to 30 then...
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It's very common with metalworking machines. Coolant pumps and DRO's operate on 117 v while the big motor operates on 220. It seems silly to me to go to the trouble of wiring new circuits without installing the third wire. It's a lot more trouble to add later.
Doug Miller wrote:

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Mike Berger wrote:
> It's very common with metalworking machines. <snip>
You must be new.
Trying to talk to Miller is like pissing up wind.
After a while, you know better.
Lew
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Pissed off because I pointed out your electrical errors *again*, I see...
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Well, of course we were talking about woodworking machinery here... :-)

Which is why I said this, in the part that you snipped:
If you want to plan for "in case you need it some day" it's better to not run cables at all, but instead pull individual conductors through conduit: pull what you need now, now; pull what you need later, later.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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