Wiring a dust collector

Hi,
I'm wiring up my shop. I have a total of 8 separate wall circuits. One circuit is solely for the dust collector. Two of them are 220's. The rest are simple 20 amp circuits. The lights are on completely unrelated circuits. They will all come into the breaker box via the bottom. I am interested in wiring them up so that whenever current is being drawn by any of the seven, the dust collector circuit will "sense" that a tool is on and then kick in the dust collector. Finally, it would be nice to make it so that the dust collector remains running for an additional 10 or 15 seconds after the tool is shut down. I wouldn't need to have all seven circuits hooked up this way maybe just four of the 20 amps and one of the 220's. With ample instructions I think I can handle the job myself. I'm not that familiar with relays but if you can point me to the parts I would need and give me some wiring tips I should be able to do this. At first I was just going to get one of those remote control gadgets from Penn State or wire in a half dozen 4-way switches scattered around the room but this solution would be neater and fully automatic.
Thanks,
Nick
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junkmail snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (Nick) wrote in message

You might have better luck posting this question in sci.electronics.basics. I'm sure there are a bunch of people there that could help.
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There's an article in Fine Woodworking - July/August 2000Pg 66 - titled "Dust Detector" "Switch automatically turns on dust collector when machines are running." I was reading it last night - could be just what you're looking for. Gives wiring diagrams for 120 and 220 plus pictures and graphics... Looks easy to follow and the total cost at that time was about $60 for the parts, the mos6t expensive of which was a current sensor.
It gives sources for the parts as well (Granger for the TCSHAA sensor/relay)
Good luck - You're wiring in the shop sounds like what I'd like to have!
Keith Piercey
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Sorry...The sensor is made by SSAC not Granger.
http://www.SSAC.com
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Hey Nick,
A current sensing relay (doughnut) type would work well, by running the hot leg of each of your machinery circuits through it. Not sure if a delay would be possible, unless you also incorpoated a timing relay. (eg. run your hot sides thru the current sensing relay, and have that energize your timing relay(adjustable) for your dust collector.
Send me an email if you need more info or a drawing.
Cheers,
Andy
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On 25 Jan 2004 23:48:21 -0800, junkmail snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (Nick) wrote:

Hi Nick, Your idea is a good one, and I thought about similar approaches. Finally, I just broke down and bought the LongRanger remote for my PennState 220v. It installs in seconds, looks clean, not too expensive and works great. There are two models, one for 120v and another for 220v. Sure I have to push a button for On/Off, but it is so much easier than walking over to the DC and turing it On/Off. The remote has a belt clip on it, but I usually keep it on my Biesmeyer table saw fence. I think what you propose might have a few drawbacks and cost more than the LongRanger.
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I've been contemplating the same thing you have for quite some time. There was a product made called the Automater by some company that has since went out of business. You can get current sensing relays from your electrical dealer that can be mounted in you electrical breaker box that will accomplish what you want.
You may also wish to contemplate getting the microswitched blast gate system from Pen State Industries. It can be bought directly from them or through somebody like Amazon. It turns on your dust collector whenever you open a blast gate. Works like a champ. A friend designed his own system similar to the PSI unit. I am planning on ordering it soon. The only disadvantage is that you have to run hook up wire to each blast gate. Not a great deal for a mobile system that is hooked up and unhooked regularly. More of a permanent install system.
Rick

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Thanks for all the advice.
Nick
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