Winter's on it's way- any tips for heating a garage-type shop?

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Hello all,
My shop is a 20'X24' garage with two insulated walls, and no isulation in the ceiling. I live in Western Wisconsin, so it gets colder than a mother-*$&%#$ out here. I'd like to find a semi-portable method of heating my shop so that I don't have to stop working all winter. The building is a rental, so I'm hesitant to install a big heater that is going to be too tough to take with when my wife and I buy a house (probably next spring). The shop has a chimney (though I have no idea why) so I may be able to use that for a vented heater.
I only need it to be heated to, say 50 degrees or so, just enough to keep me from freezing solid, but I want the heat to be relatively safe, and to try and keep my tools from rusting when I heat the building up (It will only be heated whn I'm working). Electiric heat is out, because the electrical service is not the best, and I don't want to trip the breakers every time I use a tool, so I think I'm going to need propane or a wood stove.
I've seen the tube-type "jet" heaters before, and they seem to work pretty well, but is there another type that may be safer to use around wood that would work? I can't say that money is not a limiting factor, but I'm willing to invest in the right tool for the job at hand. I'd love to insulate and sheetrock it, but the wife says no way, since I don't own the building and we intend to move fairly soon.
Thanks for any advice!
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I've used one of those propane powered radiant heaters the past two winters. The biggest problem I've learned to deal with is condensation. I discovered my precious pattern rasps had rusted while in a drawer as well as some of my metal cutting files. Also, some moisture will condense on the cold iron of my Unisaw so I have to watch that. I put a carbon monoxide detector next to where I work and it never has indicated any CO. Larry
--
Lawrence L'Hote
Columbia, MO
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scribbled:

I use one too for the initial heating of the shop. And I'm in the Yukon. See the top of:
http://www.canadiantire.ca/gateway/portable-heaters.htm
for what I mean. I use the 17,00 BTU unit in my 14'X28' shop.
Once the temperature is up, I use small ceramic electric heaters (which you might not want to do given your 'lectric problems). No problem with condensation, but we have really dry air. If it's been going for a few hours, I will often open all doors to "blow out" the hot humid air when I leave the shop. You should see the fog it creates when it's 40 below zero outside!
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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... snip

Note to self: This is why I live in Arizona. [/begin sarcasm mode 40 BELOW zero? Like, doesn't air become liquid about there? /end sarcasm mode]

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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 21:47:32 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Fine, you can keep the scorpions and rattlers in your back yard. And the monotonous weather. When you're outside, it's a lot easier to get warm at -40C than to cool off at +40C. Fire, you know. Oops, I forgot. You can't make fires. No trees where you are. (OBWW) No thanks. ;-) Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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Actually there are trees in arizona. Take a drive in the snow up towards Flagstaff and drive through the piney woods.
scott
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 21:47:32 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Now that's a good idea, too... how is the job market in Arizona these days? :)

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wrote:

Depends upon what you do. Home building is booming around here.

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Why does everybody keep writing all of these notes to Charlie? Can't he figure anything out on his own? Seems like a reasonably sharp fellow to me, but everyone keeps sending him all these notes...
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 20:19:27 -0700, Mark & Juanita

I've got a few years in framing and drywall as a day job, and a couple more putting up small structures on weekends. Might be an option, but I don't know too much about AZ...

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5000 watt shop heaters are less than $50 and tiny (a foot square) and simply require a 220 30 amp circuit. It's pretty easy to run a cord to power the thing. Might not be legal but contractors do it.
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But he said the electric supply is questionable.
5000 watts = 17,000 Btu. (it needs 21 amps at 230V) Not enough to keep that size building warm in very cold weather. I have a slightly smaller, partially insulated garage. When the temperature is in the teens, the 30,000 Btu propane heater is not enough. You can get larger units for not a lot more money. That would be my choice today, probably the 80,000.
Other option is a wood burner. That assumes the chimney is in good shape and you have a decent supply of wood to feed it. The heat is not as instant as propane as you have to get the fire going and get that hunk of metal up to temperature. There could be a 30 to 60 minute lag to reasonable comfort. Long wait if you just want to putter in the shop for an hour after dinner. Even with my propane heater, at times I have to wait 15 to 30 minutes until it is bearable out there.
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I think he was referring to his 110 not 220. If he has an electric clothes dryer he has the juice

How warm is warm. It should maintain 50 during the day.

Can void insurance, messy and in many places illegal.

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I have a similar situation with a 30,000 Btu heater. It will NOT maintain 50 during the day in CT. He is in Wisconsin with similar climate. I can get a 20 to 25 degree temperature rise. When it is 5 degrees outside, it is not going to be 50 inside. If you live in a mild climate, it will be plenty. WI is not all that mild.
In addition, when you leave the space unheated for a long time, you lose the latent heat. It takes a very long time to re-build than especially with the mass of some of the heavy tools.
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As in "water vapor"?

That sounds like "sensible" vs "latent" heat.
Nick
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:cjpjsi$ snipped-for-privacy@acadia.ece.villanova.edu...

Correct.
A tablesaw can absorb one heck of a lot of heat as it ices up on a really cold day. Takes forever to get the room warm enough to work.
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On 3 Oct 2004 15:28:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

No, as in heat held in the thermal "mass" of whatever it is you have kept warm. Objects with large mass tend to hold heat for a long while, thus the reason one would use rocks or water to store heat from a solar collector. Once lost, it takes a significant amount of time and energy to rebuild the heat in that mass. Since woodshops contain some fairly large tools containing a lot of thermal mass, once heated, they will stay warm for a while, conversely, once they give up that heat, it takes a long time and a lot of energy to warm them up again.

Not exactly, it is often very inefficient to have to restore heat lost from massive items.

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Try again.
Latent heat is the heat associated with a change of phase. Sensible heat is the the heat associated with a change in temperature.
It takes 10,000 Btus to evaporate a pound of water. It takes 10 btus to raise the temperature of a pound of water 10 degrees F.
Jay
wrote:

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On 3 Oct 2004 15:28:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

so, do you have to worry about the latent heat coming out of the closet??
Mac
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He said the ceiling was uninsulated. I would bite the bullet and stick some 6" batts in the ceiling. You can always take them with you when you leave.<g> Get 5 4x8 sheets of the rigid insulation they put on flat roofs under T&G. Stand this up across the uninsulated front side of the garage. For under $300 you have an insulated room. You could even do the ceiling with this rigid stuff. It's actually pretty cheap for about R18. About a third of the price of the pink or blue stuff at the Borg.
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