windows windows ,new windows...

My house has sliding stanley single pane aluminum windows , I would like to replace them with wooden double pane windows.
Replacement ones presumably would slide like the old ones a la sliding glass doors . Only problem I cant imagine a wood window sliding in a wood frame with any efficiency . I need pointers and some source of info on making such windows .Any help appreciated ....mjh
-- http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2
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Mike, Do you mean multi-light panes or dual-glazed or both.
When I made the new windows for my home. I made them out of vertical grain fir. It was a PITA. I would suggest using cypress. The mutton bars were the hardest to fit. Mill all of the basic stock square first, then the mortises them mill the final shape. Mill the top and bottom wider as well as the sides. (Stiles & Rails) Build the windows then cut to final side after fitting into the window casing. (Extra wide & tall if using existing casings).
The standard window sash bit kits are made for single glazed windows. I have not found a source for dual glazed yet. All I did was mill up the parts then cut them deeper with a dado bit. Careful to leave enough stock for the inside detail. I had a local window company make the dual glazed panes to size, then I glazed them in.
As mine were double hung, I did not worry about sliding, that's my next project. I plan on building them essentially the same way but have the ride on a stainless bar inset into the window sill and a small piece of Teflon striping dadoed into the bottom of the window itself.
Dave

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scribbled:

I never thought I'd be giving *you* advice about woodworking, but here goes. :-)
Instead of horizontal sliding windows (I assume, given, your statement about sliding doors), I would make casement windows (hinged and opening like a door) because they are much easier to weatherstrip. The weatherstripping on sliding windows doesn't seal very well, and wears out quickly. Believe me on this - living in the Yukon, weatherstripping is something I need to be very concerned about. In any case, most of the heat loss (or gain, as the case might be) is through infiltration around the sash rather than transmission through the glass. IMNSHO, there is almost no point in using double or triple glazing if the sash is not properly weatherstripped.
I have not seen wooden horizontal sliders in years as they are no longer used (AFAIK) in Canada. The only solution I can think of is to use plastic tracks with the attached fuzzy weatherstripping.
However, screens on casement windows will be PITA and require the use of specialised hardware (crank openers, friction hinges, latches) that can be operated behind the screen, as the screen needs to be on the inside if the window opens to the outside. Check out local window manufacturers, they might give you sources or sell you the hardware, especially if you are buying lots of glass from them.
You might want to get a copy of John Birchard, "Make you own Handcrafted Doors and Windows", Sterling, 1988 ISBN 0-8069-6544-4. A little thin on windows and a lot of stuff on joinery (pretty much the same as doors, about which I believe you may have a slight inkling), but some good stuff nevertheless.
Also, make sure you know the thickness of your glass panes before you decide on the size of the rebate, sticking and stops for the windows. DAMHIKT.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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