window question

I have a old farm house with wood windows and 6 pains in each top and bottom, not new but very old I installed plastic on the inside and have pretty good storms on the outside, why do I have ice on the outside of the storms, mostly in the corners working to the middle
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Because it is freezing outside.
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Leon wrote:

It took a guy from Houston to figure it out. <G>
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It seemed straight forward enough. ;~)
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The house I grew up in was like that. Get up in the morning and there were FANTASTIC frost pictures on the storm windows.
Ice is formed when air with some moisture content meets a surface cold enuf to freeze the water out of the air.
Usually the heat leaking from the house keeps the outside of the storms warm enuf so that there is no frost. If yours are really frosting up on the outside surface, congratulations, your house is keeping its heat to itself instead of warming the outdoors.
Its more likely that the frost is on the inside surface of the outside storm. Warm air (with some moisture content) from the house leaks into the space between the windows, and when it hits the cold outside pane, its moisture freezes. The ice is thinner at the middle because the middle of the storm window is warmer than the edges. More heat is leaking from the house through the glass than through the frame.
How to fix? Unless you want to spend big bucks on a new replacement window installation, you can't. Wait for global warming to arrive.
Old Guy

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Assumuing you mean "the inside of the storm window": I's assume its leakage of heated moist (house air) through the inner walls into the space between inner and outer wall. There are probably cracks in the paint on the sides of the window casings that let some of that moist air into the space between the inner and outer glassed spaces. And, since the moisture will always condense on the coldest surface around, it attaches itself to the outer (storm) window.
Pete Stanaitis ---------------
L @@ K wrote:

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