Window Glazing

I know this isn't really the right newsgroup for this, but hey, I'll ask anyhow. I was going to replace a cracked window on one side of my house, the side that gets the most direct sunlight, and I noticed that a lot of the window glazing has started to crack. While I'm not really looking forward to removing and re-glazing a dozen windows, especially since a lot of the windows have 7-9 individual lights, I was wondering if there was an easier way. I seem to remember somewhere that there was a PVC product that could be cut to size and glued and/or bradded into place that would resist weathering and baking, plus it would make it a lot easier to replace windows if need be by just removing the molding and then replacing it.
Has anyone had any experience with this kind of thing and/or know of good suppliers? How does it paint? I haven't looked yet, I thought I'd see if anyone has used it before I went checking out costs, etc. I'd need a lot of 3/8" triangular stock in white.
Thanks a ton.
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"Brian Henderson" wrote:

Worked in a hardware while I was in high school.
One of my jobs was to replace broken window panes in windows customers brought in for repair.
First time I was given this job, had brown pants before I was done, but you learn.
It was a learning experience for a 16 year old kid, but I survived..
Biggest part of the job was removing the broken glass and old putty to prepare window for new glass.
One you get the hang of it, reglazing a window pane is a piece of cake.
It is a skill that requires time to acquire, but is not difficult.
Today, I would not use glazers putty, but rather something like 3M5200 or 3M4200 which is easier to remove later, if necessary.
Trying to fit a plastic triangular piece into a sash, then having to glue it in place will not only double the work, but also not provide as good a seal just glazing the window pane into the sash.
YMMV.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Replacing the glass isn't a big deal, although since I'm working with restoration glass, it's a bit of a pain and expense.

Never said it wasn't, I've done it plenty of times before, but when you're talking about scraping down a dozen windows and probably close to 60 individual lights, that's when it becomes a pain.

Since the glass is all set in a bed of silicone, it's already sealed in place, there's no air exchange with the outside, this is being done for purely cosmetic purposes. I don't want to have to go back every couple of years and re-do it over. Besides, it's not especially difficult to miter corners, we do it all the time for picture frames, etc.
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"Brian Henderson" wrote:

Did you perhaps see a "This Old House" episode where they were doing exactly what it sounds like you are facing?
They used a Fein Multitool to clear out all the old glazing which sure eliminated a lot of the mess.
Why use silicone?
There are so-------------------o many better sealants out there at relatively the same cost.
Lew
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IIRC the plastic/PCV that you are speaking about is used on aluminum windows, it snaps in place. If you have wooden windows I think you are going to have to put the putty/glazing back in.
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