Will this fit tighten with glue?

I am using some coat pegs that measure 0.493". That is a pretty sloppy fit in a 0.500" hole, but other than hoping I can find an undersized drill bit, I am not sure what to do about it. Presumably the glue will swell the pieces a bit; but will it be enough for a secure installation? The pegs are a bit too expensive to waste one on a test.
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You're talking about a 3-4 thou gap, I think the glue will fill this just fine. However, don't count on the swelling - it may swell at first, but it will shrink back again as it dries and regains equilibrium.
If it bothers you, use epoxy instead of yellow glue. Epoxy is structural, yellow glue isn't.
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Toller wrote:

I'd go with either epoxy or maybe the "chair doctor" glue that is designed to swell the wood.
Chris
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I do not know where you are. Here we have a cold winter and hot summer. During the winter the house heating system works a lot. Even if the pegs measure 0.50 outside dia. they do shrink to the point that they do fall out. To cope with this change in temperature and wood expansion and contraction I have use a dab of gorilla glue. This glue does expand and flex when the ambient temperature changes. Any expanding glue sold by other manufactures should do a good job. The chair doctor glue as stated earlier on this thread is, also, a good choice. I also keep all wooden dowels, pegs and biscuits in air tight container stored in ambient temperature. As for odd size pegs I make them, when needed, on the lathe and size them accordingly with the drill bit allowing for a snug fit.

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Toller wrote: > I am using some coat pegs that measure 0.493". That is a pretty sloppy > fit in a 0.500" hole, but other than hoping I can find an undersized > drill bit, I am not sure what to do about it.
Don't sweat the petty stuff and don't pet the sweaty stuff.
Drill 17/32" dia holes and use epoxy.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I can see using the epoxy but I have to marvel at the wisdom of drilling the holes, already slightly loose, .031 larger than they already are. Is this to give the epoxy room to swell?
Bill
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Bill in Detroit wrote:
> I can see using the epoxy but I have to marvel at the wisdom of drilling > the holes, already slightly loose, .031 larger than they already are. Is > this to give the epoxy room to swell?
Not really.
I have found that stronger joint are formed when thickened epoxy is used and joints aren't starved.
If this were my job, would probably add a little Cab-O-Sil (fumed silica) to the epoxy to thicken it, then pour some in the hole and push the pin in allowing the epoxy to ooze totally around the pin.
BTW, why would epoxy swell?
Lew
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The only time I used any coat pegs they were a tight fit, and the tenon flared out a bit just below the flange. I glued em, but the way I had to drive them in I think they'd have stayed in there for my lifetime without any glue.
I think I'd try a 31/64, give the bit a little wiggle to enlarge it a tad, ease the edges of the peg and drive the sucker in there. Will depend on the two woods how much you can compress the fibers, and the size of the board and location of the hole how much you risk splitting the board.
-Leuf
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"Toller" wrote in message

fit
bit,
a
Perfect time for epoxy ... you will then be able to sleep at night and not worry about it.
Until I snapped to epoxy, some joints that I did in years past still niggle me a bit at the odd time.
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Also, the pegs will get (just before glueing) a hit from some sandpaper so the glue will adhere?
Two good possibilities: saw a slot in the peg, and wedge it slightly (the wedge and slot will be hidden in use). Or, get the right size drill. 12.5mm is .492125 inch, should work well. 31/64 is .484375, so if you rough the peg with some 80grit sandpaper, it'd work, too.
To get an accurate diameter hole in wood is not easy, unless you use Forstner or (sharp) auger bits. To do it with twist drills, first make a pilot hole with 13/32", then clean it up with the fullsize drill. Wood is capable of grabbing and steering the bit that removes most of the wood, but a careful hand-held drill job that removes only the last .080 or so should work well.
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wrote:

31/64 is too small. I can probably sand it down to fit as you say.
But I am tight on the depth and wanted to use a forstners bit to avoid cutting through the backside. Not that anyone will see it, but still... I will try some from a different store and see if they are better. Thanks to all for your help.

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Toller wrote:

Do you have a wooden handled hammer? Look at how the handle is attached to the head. Use the same technique. cut a slot in the end of your pegs. Cut some wooden wedges slightly larger than the slot. When you assemble the parts, the wedges willl spread the two halves of the slotted peg enough to tighten them in the holes.
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a 0.500" hole, but other than hoping I can find an undersized drill bit, I am not sure what to do about it. ...
Try using a "fox wedge" --- that's a concealed wedge in the tenon that expands the tenon to jam tight in the hole. Only make sure the wedge doesn't bottom out and prevent the tenon from seating completely.
A couple of hints: Saw a slit in the tenon across the grain for the wedge to fit into ... Don't make the wedge from a hard, brittle wood like cherry. Use a wood that will give and compress slightly. I find red oak works fine.
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If they go in a blind hole, saw a slot in the end that goes into the hole. Insert a small wedge in the kerf such that when you tap them into the hole, the wedge is forced in. A little glue along with it and they're there for life.

fit
bit,
a
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If you are able to - put a small brad in the hole such that it is driven into the peg when you drive the peg home. With some glue in the hole of course.
Bob AZ
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