Wild Blue and satellite: not a happy customer

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"bidirectional via satellite,"
Wow, did not know that. I thought one had to be connected to the phone line and to the dish with the uplink going via phone line and the downlink coming via the dish.
Not that it changes my opinion on adjusting - let the Feds swarm over my "complex" when NSA tells them I've adjusted my satellite dish after reading this posting an tracking us down.
We don't need no stinking badges!
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wrote:

That's the money play. I've actually seen installations of receive-only dishes where there were no drip loops. Mind the impedance and harmonics on the coax, as well. That can give you some funny digital signals that a simple matching x-former won't clean up. If the installation has moisture complaint, and it would seem it does, I'd look to connectors and insulation.
As far as the FCC and such, you can't alter the _output_ of your transmitter, but pointing the antenna is free game. License wasn't required for the installer, either.
RF guy wants solder versus crimp on his connectors to keep the current flowing in spite of corrosion. Old habits die hard.
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That's only the start...
I've seen dish installs done by run & gun contractors that fanned coax diagonally across the roof, strung & stretched to tension, mid-air through attics (in case you get birds in the attic? <G>), run across lawns, drilled straight through the roofing, etc... Some of those guys had to provide sundries & cable, so they used as little as they could, and even reused scrap wire.
A neighbor of mine had a guy who joined coax with WIRE NUTS & TAPE, so he could use a 6' cut-off! The splice hung down the side of the house, unattached to the wall, so it slapped the siding during storms. It all reminded me of the early CATV installers, the guys who would put stepladders on the roof of the van to reach high locations!
At least in my area, Dish and DirecTV have now turned to larger installation companies. The installers actually get some training and are able to use enough employer-provided supplies to do a halfway decent job.
Personally, I'm looking forward to trying out at&t U-Verse, once it's offered to my neighborhood.
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Charlie Self wrote:

That doesn't sound right. Light rains shouldn't cause that kind of problem.

You will get more dropouts with satellite internet because you are dealing with higher bandwidth and a more finicky signal, but the problem you are describing seems to be excessive even for satellite.

Ouch. Maybe there is a satellite provider out there worse than Direcway (the one I had BD (before DSL))
... snip

The speed was what kept me with Direcway until DSL showed up. It wasn't 100% reliable, but it was much more reliable than what you are describing; it sounds like either something got knocked out of alignment or wasn't set up properly. My first Direcway setup was setup with the wrong coax and I had problems very similar to what you are describing. Finally got them to re-install and move the dish closer to the room with the computer when I bought the upgraded modem; things got much better after that.

What does the alignment kit consist of?

Good luck.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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*snip: list of problems*
Charlie,
On February 29th, Wildblue switched everyone over to Google's services. This means no NNTP access. Their newsgroup domains now point to Google Groups. If all you do is text groups (and not a lot of binary groups), Astraweb will provide you with 90GB (promotional) of Usenet downloads for $25.
This also means Wildblue's not running email servers, NNTP servers, and maybe not even web servers anymore. The price, of course, will stay the same.
You purchased your equipment (that's what the $400 install fee was), so I don't see any reason it should be illegal to adjust your dish. Check your service contract first, though.
Internet via satellite is much more sensitive than TV by satellite, so you need it secured well. The dish got misaligned the next day and the installer came back out and added a second brace. It's been good and fairly steady ever since. (It still goes out for storms and things, but so does the TV satellite.)
Turn off the proxy optimiser thing and see if that helps you out any on speed. (In IE, look under Internet Options> Connection> Local Area Network, and uncheck the "use a proxy server" box.) Sometimes that gets overloaded and slows your connection down.
Satellite's biggest problem is latency. Some pages don't load any faster than on dialup because the signal has to travel up and down several times to grab all the information. On a download, satellite is usually quite a bit faster than dialup. For regular surfing, it feels about the same. (It's usually a little faster.)
FWIW, I'm a Wildblue customer. I'm not affiliated with Wildblue other than that. We don't exactly have an option other than maybe Hughesnet... AT&T says DSL is available here, AT&T says DSL is not available here. Oh yeah, one more note: Dish Network's Internet is Wildblue resold. The difference is you lease the equipment for $300 rather than buying it for $400.
Puckdropper
--
Marching to the beat of a different drum is great... unless you're in
marching band.
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don't see any reason it should be illegal to adjust your dish.
Of course not. Its your "dish" / antenna mounted to your home and your equipment
Adjust the thing.
And, while your son is at it, check to see that your connections are weather tight and that you are running true HOME RUNS from the Dish to the equipment with out any splices for any reason in that/those line(s).
Might as well check the mounting bolts and braces, too.
Years ago I recall seeing a system that incorporated an alignment feature into the hardware. As I recall, one selected "Alignment" from a menu and then got a reading (if you were close) as to how far off the dish was and where to turn it to get a better signal. Don't see why they don't include this sort of software now - maybe the teh has a "back door" to access it. Check some other (than Woodworking) groups and you may find the answers from the geeks who live and breathe this stuff.
BTW Signup for a Google o Netzero account and use Edura or Outlook Express for your e-mailing. Much better than using web-based e-mail clients and much cheaper than AOL..
Netzero charges $9,95 or a year and includes 30 hours/month of dial-up access with this account - great when on the road or, in your case, when the Dish goes down but your local phone line works.
.
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

Another option for occasional dialup use is prepaid. I use bamnet when on the road in the 5th wheel and no wireless is available. You buy it in $20 increments and it uses $0.01/minute. No monthly bill!
http://www.bamnet.com /
I have no affiliation other than as a satisfied user.
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I've got dial-up (AOL) on my wife's computer. $9.95 a month,unlimited, now. At least I think so. It is still a PITA, but she doesn't want to learn another, so...Wildblue's program, according to my installer, won't work with AOL as a dial-up on the same computer, so, no dial-up here.
Right now, I'm just waiting. I've got 10 months, maybe less, on an 18 month contract that started last July 5. The long contract got the satellite and install for $233...$198 advertised cost, plus $35 shipping they don't tell you about, which should have been an indicator of what was to come. I am also hoping. The local cable set up is terrible. DSL should be better, if it ever gets here. If WIldblue can't accept amonth to month contract AND fix my problems, or most of them, within the next 10 months, I'll revert to dial up at 10 bucks a month. A third the speed, but 10% of the aggravation for 20% of the cost. That deal looks better each month...as long as it isn't AOL!
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Charlie Self wrote:
... snip

You shouldn't have any problem going month to month after the initial contract is up (at least that was the case with Direcway), they do the initial lock-in to supposedly recoup their investment in the "great deal" they give you on the hardware when you sign up.
Just as an aside, I've been using concentric (www.concentric.net) as my backup and travelling dial-up ISP; it is also the host for my web page. I've had them for years and have had both good service. When you pay for 6 months, it's about $18/month,
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Thanks, Mark. I'll check into it. Right now, I'm in the final two months of a book, with three or four magazine articles to do in the same period, while also finishing my taxes. I hope to have the latter done today or tomorrow, one article out Friday, and maybe another 5,000 words of the book rolled through the keyboard by next Monday, but that means I won't be researching much else.
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and you can bloody well point where you want. Think about sending the service provider a bill for splattering your land with a crapped up signal. You might cite a few antipollution laws.
Enjoy Pete
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