Why punch holes in sandpaper for Makita finishing sander?

I've had this sander for years, model BO4550. It's OPM14000, 1.6 amp. I just noticed the plate that was supplied to punch two rows of holes, 3 holes/row in the sandpaper. What's the point of doing that. I've never used it. Thanks for the clarification.
Dan
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I've had this sander for years, model BO4550. It's OPM14000, 1.6 amp. I just noticed the plate that was supplied to punch two rows of holes, 3 holes/row in the sandpaper. What's the point of doing that. I've never used it. Thanks for the clarification.
Dan
Followup. I guess it maybe is to aid sucking saw dust into the supplied dust bag. I don't generally use that. Is it really effective? It's pretty tiny.
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That's exactly why it there. Did you read the manual?
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wrote:
:That's exactly why it there. Did you read the manual?
I guess I did read the manual but I don't know if I have it anymore. I got it over 20 years ago. Do most people use those dust bags? My impression was that they were not extremely effective in controlling dust and the bag is very small.
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Depending on the design, there may be an adapter to hook-up a 'shop vac'.
The DeWalt has one, however my Ryobi doesn't; it uses a similar 'hole punch plated' . Although the 'coupling' design is similar, the dimensions don't match.
Although it is a 'finishing' sander, not meant for heavy work, I did use it to sand the bottom of a 19 foot sailboat {while it was on it's trailer}. The anti-fouling paint dust had to be 'captured'.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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:Depending on the design, there may be an adapter to hook-up a 'shop vac'. : :The DeWalt has one, however my Ryobi doesn't; it uses a similar 'hole punch :plated' . Although the 'coupling' design is similar, the dimensions don't :match. : :Although it is a 'finishing' sander, not meant for heavy work, I did use it :to sand the bottom of a 19 foot sailboat {while it was on it's trailer}. The :anti-fouling paint dust had to be 'captured'. : :Regards & Good Luck, :Ron Magen :Backyard Boatshop
Thanks, Ron. I have a shopvac, a ShopVac QSP Pro 8.0 gallon, 3.0 horsepower. Don't know how I might connect it to the Makita finishing sander, but if possible it is a great idea and would save me the trouble of having to take my work outside all the time, which I do often. Maybe if an adaptor isn't available I can fashion one myself somehow.
I have a simple single hole hole punch, that I suppose I could use to punch the sandpaper pieces, although I'd think there would be an effect of dulling the punch.
I used to work on boats professionally (although I was mostly a grunt) around 20 years ago. I guess I sanded a few hulls and painted some with anti-fouling paint. Some of the nastier work I had to do on boats. Of course, that paint is toxic. I don't believe we used any kind of device to suck up the dust, but probably wore dust masks.
Dan :
: :> wrote: :> :> :That's exactly why it there. Did you read the manual? :> :> I guess I did read the manual but I don't know if I have it anymore. I :> got it over 20 years ago. Do most people use those dust bags? My :> impression was that they were not extremely effective in controlling :> dust and the bag is very small. :> :
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You'll eat up a hole punch in a hurry. Use a disk with the pre-cut holes in it and mark where you want the new holes to be in your new piece of sandpaper. Take a punch (flat point) and place it over the hole and on a piece of pine or other soft wood. Use a hammer to hit the punch and it will leave the hole right where you want it. Vary the diameter of the hole by the size of the punch. This also works with sheet metal and leather. By the way, not to sure how long regular sandpaper will last.
On Tue, 02 Sep 2003 19:08:00 GMT, Dan Musicant

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'Ramsey',
Not only will a 'single hole paper punch' wear out quickly, but it probably won't work - not enough 'throat', hole too small, and only strong enough for one or two pieces at a time.
What I meant was a HOLE punch, the one's you can get from Harbor Freight for about $4 a set of 5. They look like short pieces of steel tubes {different diameters} with one end 'sharpened'. Of course you can pay a lot more for a 'fancier' set, or individually. Or 'make-your-own' from a piece of appropriate ID steel {or iron}pipe.
I also believe I said 'pre-punched' ones could be gotten from different sources. The 'trick' is to get at least one 'factory-made' one to use as a template. Then it's a simple matter to set up a jig to hold a short stack of 'un-punched' paper, then take your Ball Peen hammer and punch out the holes.
For ME, the grit usually wears off before the paper rips off, so I stick with the 'lightweight' stuff. Note, this 'trick' is a simple expedient - used if I need a specific grit size, or I am out of the 'pre-punched' paper.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
wrote:

vac'.
punch
SNIP
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