Why Not???

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Not surprisingly, it depends... :) Most production shops I'm aware of do use dedicated tenoners...
Is there something available there that is within average individual/serious hobby price range?
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<snip>

I have no knowledge of commercial US workshops, but a question:
Are you talking about a dedicated tenoning machine such as the Leigh FMT, or something more like the JDS Multirouter? Or yet something else?
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

Something like this, I'm thinking...
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/woodworking/production_tenoning.html
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when Duane Bozarth

Yes, that sort of thing. $5K starting point and upwards.
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Most weekend warriors would not even know what a typical production tenoning machine looks like or cost(waaaaay over 5K used).
Here is a sample:
http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/machinery.pl?read94281
Patriarch wrote:

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That sucker looks like there ought to be a Spec5 driving, and a small platoon of grunts following in proximity!
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Nahm does this all the time...
When I tried it, with my ATB blade, I had little ridges and a small bat-ear at the cheek/shoulder. Personally, I'd probably invest in a FTG blade if I was going to do this alot...
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works best for the project at hand. In addition to nibbling with the saw blade or using a tenoning jig, you can cut the tenons with a dado head. Or you can cut the tenons with a tenon cutter on your router table. Or you can cut them with a handsaw. Those are just the ways that come off the top of my head.
I don't think that any particular way has a monopoly on safety Jim
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When I have a number of tenons to cut, as in a run of doors, I use the method of cutting the shoulders as you describe.
I'll lay up a nice wide piece and cut maybe six sticks worth with their shoulder cuts, flip them over and cut the other side.
Where we fall out is on the nibbling. The nibbling creates a chattered cut - not fit for gluing.
A decent glue up demands an interface between the parts that cannot be achieved by your teacher's method - except for this:
It is just possible, although it is an extraordinary effort, to nibble away, such as you describe, and then go back over the nibbled area with a lateral motion, back and forth across the saw blade. This is more of a field man's trick than a shop man's common practice.
A tenon jig is no big thing to cobble, if you can't afford the metal version.
It's worth your time to do.
Be advised - your jig will be for naught if your blade is not truly perpendicular to your table. If it is not - you will cut a wedge - not a tenon.
Thomas J. Watson - WoodDorker
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 (webpage)
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Well guys, you've given me a lot to think about. I've decided to buy the CELASCHI [320C] - 8 HEAD DOUBLE END TENONER for my son. It's only $6,000 or $7000 more than a Delta tenoning jig and it looks like it will last! It can probably also help out if we're attacked by aliens.
Now for the hard question. I visited his shop class and spoke with the instructor. Turns out that he has an old (and I mean OLD) Delta jig that weights about 30 pounds or so. It's basically a hunk of metal that slides in a track and has a clamp. It doesn't have any fine adjustment capability. After this discussion I'm think of actually getting a tenoning jig. I've seen the Delta which is so-so and costs a lot and heard that Woodcraft also makes a good one at $70 but it also weighs in at over twenty pounds. Woodworkers Supply has an aluminum 'universal table saw jig' (p. 34, #30-254) that has the capability to do tenons, spline joints, lap joints, etc. It costs ~$60 and weighs around 5 lbs. If anyone knows about this or has an opinion on the above it will be appreciated.
orland
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If you can buy that "hunk" for less than fifty - I'll give you seventy five for it.
It will replace the one that I foolishly sold about fifteen years ago.
Thomas J. Watson - WoodDorker
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 (webpage)
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scribbled:

Who is again foolishly selling tools. You ain't in bizness no more, Tom. Luckily, the prices you are posting will allow you to buy the same tools again and mebbe make a little profit in the bargains.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html
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Thomas J. Watson - WoodDorker

Hey Tom, in turn I'll give you a hunnert for it and pay postage.

sigh... The things we do in our yout'.
UA100
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 04:56:14 -0600, Unisaw A-100

Wish I could say I was young and stupid...
...but I wasn't young.
Thomas J. Watson - WoodDorker
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 (webpage)
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And you're still not.
Hope you got the other problem fixed... :-)
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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The Woodcraft is almost identical to the 183 model Delta. Neither is 20 pounds, I don't think. I have the Delta, but if I was buying tomorrow, I'd buy the Woodcraft and invest the difference is Bob Vila videos.

Never saw one so I can't comment.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome /






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Heavy is your friend. Light weight means more vibration, less stability.
Cast iron is also your friend. Aluminum means flexing. Cast iron means stiffness.
Aluminum also means aluminum oxide rubbing off on the wood, and leaving gray marks. Used to have a Craftsman TS with aluminum top. Glad I don't any more.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 13:15:19 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Very true. But heavy is not good for portability, if that is an issue.
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I usually cut them flat. My method is to set the fence to match the length of the tenon and cut the shoulder first. Using a miter gauge, I make a few passes to remove most of the material, then slide the tenon across the blade perpendicularly (bumping against the fence as a stop) while slowly moving the miter gauge forward. I find this gives a nice smooth finish on the face.
orland wrote:

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