Why my table saw scares the hell out of me.

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One more time . . .
If you understand the physics it's easier to know what to do and not to do. It's those nasty rear teeth, rising up out of the table saw top, that initiate "kickbacks". You want to keep the wood behind the front cutting teeth away from the top rear quarter "lurking" teeth.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/KickBack1.html
Cross cutting an 8 foot 2x4 on a table saw is not a great idea - a chop saw, miter saw, sliding miter saw or compound sliding miter saw is made to do that job. Cross cutting on a table saw with the end against the fence is a no-no.
charlie b
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Or a radial arm saw... <g>
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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<...snipped...>

Don't forget a Disston.
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Often wrong, never in doubt.
Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - lwasserm(a)charm(.)net
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On 28 Sep 2006 08:06:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@robmward.com wrote:

The T/S does not *scare* me in the least. I have a world of respect for the machine, but fear does not come into play. Like driving a car or handling a firearm, fear is a very bad thing and could lead to an accident.
Since all the SawStop debates I have paid more attention to what I actually do on the T/S. Before, I never really studied my actions or habits. I find that I comply to many safety guidelines unconsciously -w/o thinking about it. I also find that my hands are rarely in a position to be injured. Again, in fairness, I don't want to state that it would be impossible, but very unlikely. The bottom line is, IMO, you need to be comfortable on the equipment.
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On 28 Sep 2006 08:06:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@robmward.com wrote:

<<< Snip >>>
If you contact Delta, you can either download the manual if it is availible, or they will mail you one. In either case, the manual contains all the safety directions you need to operate the saw properly.
And for what it's worth, I've experienced kickback two or three times- always because I wasn't following the rules, but none of those resulted in any real injury. While it can be very dangerous, it is more often than not just a bit of excitement. Same rule for saws as for horses- if one kicks, get right back on it.
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Knock on stock, but I've been ripping and crosscutting on a 10 inch Sears for 20 years, and I've never experienced kickback. Not once. With my Stihl chainsaw, yes (but that's another story, not involving reproductive gear).
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snipped-for-privacy@robmward.com wrote:

Have you considered just using a bandsaw? With the correct blades this excellent machine will do 90% of what a table saw can do, including rip cutting. It's safer - the blade runs down and pins the workpiece to the table - and the kerf is narrow so little material is lost. Also you can do scroll cutting, dovetails and other joints - it's so versatile I don't know what I'd do without mine. Less room than a tablesaw due to upright design.
Your tablesaw doesn't want to kill you, it's an inanimate object. A bandsaw finds it difficult to kill you.
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*snip*

You're depersonifying a table saw while personifying a band saw?
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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snipped-for-privacy@robmward.com wrote:

(disclaimer:I am going to describe some dangerous procedures, dont do them unelss you fully understand them and are willing to accept complete responsibility of your actions.)
yes, you should be very afraid of any power tool. the time you become fearless of the destructive power of any power tool, i'tll rise up and bite you.
and yes, I still have all ten fingers.
I worked at a cabinetry place, and have seen people get really nasty injuries due to kick backs (ripping a 1/2"x1/2"x8' in half, lengthwise!) I quit that job before i was there a year.
But I alsmost conquered my fear, I'll tell you how.
take that table saw, raise the blade real high, get a 2x12 about five feet long and rip a 2inch peice out of it. about the easiest rip cut to do, plenty of room for your hands, and you should be at least 3 ft away from the whirling blade of death. feel free to use gloves, as you wont complete the ripping cut.
halfway thru the cut, try to stall the saw.
if you are lucky, you'll blow the breaker and not a thermal overload. turn off the saw and go in the house and relax.
this gives you a good idea of how easy a big heavy piece of wood can stop the saw. I believe once you realize that you need to have the cutting power match the job, the safer things get.
also, when doing that ripping/stall procedure, you'll find some flaws that may not be apparent. fence crooked? table too small? guards not proper?, shop floor uneven? stand wobbles? stand too light? dull blade? table sticky? blade cuts in a curve? shop too small?
look up info on featherboards. install a smaller diameter blade. fix any flaws up above and any that seem apparent. even the tiniest amount of the above flaws can cripple the best of power tools.
get the flaws straightened out, and dont attempt very dificult cuts (like ripping 1/2"x1/2") and the fear to dwindle to an acceptable level.
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Get yourself a heavy leather apprion,these are used in a lot of shops.
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