Why my table saw scares the hell out of me.

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On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 19:31:53 GMT, "Tom Gardner"

I'd call it a tie
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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wrote:

Even though I've seen lots of old pictures of woodworkers wearing ties, I can't see how wearing one is going to protect you from a kickback. (The pictures of the guys operating lathes are the worst ones!)
- Owen -
:)
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On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 20:08:05 -0400, "Owen Lawrence"

:P
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Tom Gardner wrote:

Why stop there?
I settle for nothing less than full, NHL regulation goalie gear! Who needs a GRRRRRipper when you've got a blocker?
I'm not the only one, you'll see goalie gear hanging in the background of Peter Gedry's finishing articles, as well.
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B A R R Y wrote:

I would recommend a codpiece of ballistic polymer lined with Kevlar-reinforced steel mesh. You could paint really cool flames or lightning bolts on it.
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2x4 in the chest, slap shot from 20 feet, what's the difference? (You almost always see the slap shot coming.)
Puckdropper
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Yep. Moving about the same speed, but the 2x4 is coming from a whole lot closer. Takes 10 to 15 milliseconds to get there.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Also, when the 2x4 hits you "in the chest," it hits you in the balls instead.
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Doug Miller wrote:

All that gear lets you just shake it off. <G>
FWIW, I was a defenseman when I played, not a goalie. More than once, I turned around from tying up an opposing player (puckdropper [might] call it "interference", but a man's gotta' do to do what he's gotta' do... <G>), and had about 10-15 milliseconds to get out of the way. I can't get anywhere in that amount of time. So... I got hit so hard one night, it stuck in my mind enough where years later I'd duck lightweight plastic balls used in indoor roller hockey. <G>
Then again, I've seen some on-ice officials take it bad enough that they probably would have traded it for a kickback! =8^0
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I've done that too on defense. I found you can't just block the better players, you gotta shove them out of the way.
For both sawing and goaltending, if you have a red light (ambulance) come on it's a bad thing.
Puckdropper
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snipped-for-privacy@robmward.com wrote:
: So basically I knew nothing about the table saw and for my first thing : I crosscut 8 ft 2x4s. After putting them through with the miter guide : I could feel the wood binding and my testicles immediately called for : me to turn off the saw. After doing some research I learned a lot : about crosscut sleds and why you shouldn't cut long things the narrow : way.
What was binding? You weren't usuing the fence were you? THAT can cause binding and kickback. But if you remove the fence, I don't see how you'd get binding and kickback on a crosscut of somthing 3.5" wide.
: So then I am cutting some poplar 1X8 and I am standing off to the left : side and on the side of the fence I hear the saw start to have some : trouble on the cut and all of a sudden I see the cut off piece shoot : across the garage and hit a metal sheet propped up against the side. : It was like a missle. I think it hit the sheet metal at about the : tables height!
: So I do a little research and I find that my saw blade ws up too high.
What research was this? Forrest, which manufacturers one of the best TS blade lines available, recommends running the blade at full height to reduce kickback. Think about what direction the blade is pushing the wood with the blade all the way up, vs. low down. Also, keeping the blade all the way up places it closer to the splitter, which is a good thing.
The main advantage of keeping the blade low is you won't completely cut your hand off if it runs into the blade. But since you should be using a good guard, which keeps you from doing that, this isn't relevant.
You should also be using a splitter, which is the main prenetative device for kickback. The wood can't twist into the blade if there's a good splitter in use.
: However, I am still standing at the back left side of the saw with the : fence on the right. What can I do so I can actually feel comfortable : ripping a board and not having a 10 ft push stick?
Get a good guard and splitter. Use board buddies or something similar.
    - Andy Barss
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No I wasn't using the fence,but in a more brilliant move, I didn't know which side kicked back, so I had a hand on each side of the blade with my crotch well to the side.
I think that happened is that it got almost to the end of the cut and then it binded and kind of jumped back. Not really kickback but in my mind it has bye bye teste written all over it.
So the point is that I probably over reacted but it was not the best intro. I am going to make a crosscut sled this weekend.
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<<I didn't know which side kicked back, so I had a hand on each side of the blade >>
That's most likely what caused the kickback.
Lee
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Lee Gordon wrote:

I'd like my $5 pool entry to reflect Lee's answer as the winner.
10-1, the hand on the side where the fence wasn't pushed the kerf closed, launching the board.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Hint!
Use the miter gauge for narrow stock, NOT the fence!
NEVER constrain both sides of a piece being cut!
Don't be afraid enough not to use the saw, but NEVER lose respect for it and the bad things it can do IN A HURRY!
RTFM, and maybe another or two books about table saws.
Be safe! Tex
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Having read your dissertation, two things come to mind. First, crosscutting 8-foot 2X4s seems a rather odd introduction to the table saw and although you never specifically stated it, I assume you know that when you are crosscutting you should NEVER use the fence. BTW, that story about the guy who busted his own balls is almost certainly not apocryphal. The landscape is littered with candidates for the Vienna Boys Choir who got that way due to their own misuse of their power tools.
Second, you should invest 60-70 bucks in a Grrr-ripper. http://www.microjig.com/ It won't be of much use for crosscutting 2-bys but it can make you feel a hell of a lot safer when performing ripping operations on the table saw.
Lee
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snipped-for-privacy@robmward.com wrote:

It could happen.

I don't understand this. Crosscutting long stock should never pose a safety hazard. Supporting the workpiece can be a challenge, but what's the safety issue?

What in the lord's name are you doing, using the rip fence as a guide when crosscutting?
If you're ripping and getting that kind of kickback, make sure the blade and the fence are both parallel to the miter gage slts (and each other). If necessary, toe the end of the miter fence out, away from the blade, by 1/32". Use the guard, which presumably has antikickback pawls. You should never, ever get that kind of kickback this way.
With long boards, you may need to jam a wedge into the kerf to keep it from closing.

A high blade should never, ever cause that kind of kickback. In some ways, a high blade is safer than a low one.

You're right to never stand in the line of fire.

Woodworking is spiritual. You can't do anything on a stolen saw.
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...or you could get a Sawstop. A previous poster saved his vitals with one.
Marc
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snipped-for-privacy@robmward.com writes:

Get youself a few featherboards. Put one (or more) on the top and another on the side. That way you can use a long push stick, and retain control.
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I would suggest professional help. Perhaps your employer has an Employee Assistance Program?
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No dumb questions, just dumb answers.
Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - lwasserm(@)charm(.)net
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