why is popular so nice to work, but such a pain to Finnish!

Page 1 of 2  

can I just rant for a few, I like working with popular it, it's cheep enough that I'm not paniced if I mess up, and by and large it's a very attractive wood, but THE BLOCHING! I did two coats of minwax stain conditioner, let one dry over night, then put another on an hour before I stained and it still blotched!
ok now I'm done it's ok, I'll be fine
--
if corn oil is made from corn, and olive oil is made from olives, where dose
baby oil come from?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 10 May 2005 16:32:32 -0600, Richard Clements

Why? Because it's popular. Even in Finland. I've found though that stuff made from popular keeps me awake at night. It goes cheep, cheep, cheep all night. And when it gets older, it crows at sunrise.
Butt that's wye aye switched two poplar. Knot such a pane too Finnish.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes Stewart wrote:

Paint!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But if you thin the paint too much, you'll have to do it again...hence:
Repaint!! And thin no more!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

Another escapee from the state home for the criminally silly...     :-)     j4
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jo4hn wrote:

Yep, time for ---- the Spanish Inquisition!
Josie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The Inquisition...here we go...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    Greetings and Salutations....
On Wed, 11 May 2005 09:39:34 -0400, "firstjois"

    I did NOT expect that!     G.D.R.     Dave Mundt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

Nobody ever does.........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is, they say, the unvarnished truth.o
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Never heard of popular. Are you referring to poplar?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ground up babies of course - stooopid....
(and I don't even dare sign this one......)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BobS wrote:

I heard that Oil of Olay is made from the sweat of Mexican bullfighters.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@eliminator.com says...

Human Beings (beans)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

More important, is he referring to poplar as in Populus sp. , or that magnolia masquerading under the noble name of poplar? World of difference between the two.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Richard, One of our clients is a pool / billiard table company and we have found that more and more tables are made of poplar, stained to look something like maple only with the grain obscured. As to your problem, I have had limited success with conditioners however I think you should change your application method. As the material evaporates over time, the coat applied the night before was probably all gone while the second coat was well on it's way after an hour. I have found a better way is to either apply Sealcoat first and then use a compatible stain or to spray a WB dye and do not wipe. Cheers, JG Richard Clements wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard Clements says...

Your first coat of stain conditioner was for naught since you waited too long. The second coat should have fared better, but you learned as I did that the product isn't a miracle cure. In my opinion poplar has very few redeeming qualities and is not a particularly good bargain considering I can get oak, ash, soft maple or Kentucky coffeetree for only pennies more per board foot. It's soft, weak and gets fuzzy no matter what you do. Grain and figure are non-existent, due partly to the fact that the fuzziness destroys any luster any other wood might get from good planing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 May 2005 09:25:02 -0500, Hax Planx

Sounds to me like you got cottonwood rather than poplar, since all the poplar I've seen produces little to no fuzz when worked and actually develops a rather nice luster when planed or finish sanded.
Poplar is still better as secondary wood or under paint, though.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@bendcable.com says...

greenish cast with nothing but a shellac finish. The problem is, of course, that the green gradually goes away - not so gradually in sunlight :-).
I built a tall magazine rack for a friend using poplar for the rack and alder for the two uprights and he loves it.
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MOST people use it where it will not be seen or paint it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.