Why I Never Wear Safety Goggles...

Page 1 of 3  
..subtitled, Thank God For Faceshields.
This story starts, as do most stories of accidents, with a poor choice on my part: trying to make a miter cut with a chop saw on a piece that, in retrospect, was really too small to try to hold with my free hand. I should've used a clamp.
Apparently, it shifted a bit when the saw blade hit it, and the blade grabbed it out of my fingers and -- somehow -- threw it *toward* me. At about mouth level. Right into the faceshield, so hard that _it knocked it off my head_.
I'm basically unhurt: my left thumb has a minor bruise from the workpiece being wrenched out of my hand, I have superficial cuts on two knuckles from sharp edges on the wood, and another bruise on my left pec where the wood hit after bouncing off the faceshield. Still haven't found where it went after that...
Lessons: 1. Clamp small workpieces. 2. Wood sometimes can be ejected in unexpected directions. 3. Clamp small workpieces. 4. Respect the power of a kickback. 5. Clamp small workpieces.
And, last but not least... if you've been around this ng for any length of time, you've heard me say this before: You have other things on your face besides your eyes that are worth protecting! That's not the only reason I use a faceshield instead of goggles -- but it's the only one that's on my mind right now.
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"Doug Miller" wrote:

Number One Safety Rule:
SHIT CAN SMALL PIECES.
Lew
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Good on ya. You wore a face shield. I bet the missus appreciated it. I have worn one for years. Which is attached to a hard hat. Some folks thing I am overdoing it, being over cautious, being a safety freak, etc., etc.
But that is OK. I started doing this when doing metalwork years ago and do it around almost any kind of power tool operation now. I have had enough things hit that mask and helmet to know it is a good idea. Nothing like a good thunk on the safety equipment to realize that you just protected yourself from the biggest danger in the shop. YOURSELF!!!
Another comment. The above remarks are another reason why you can never have too many clamps. I had a metal grinding job recently that just turned out to be too dangerous to pursue. I went to Harbor Freight and bought about 20 clamps. That job went well. And I have used the clamps on a number of woodworking jobs since, Clamps are universal, You need them.
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On Sep 19, 5:06 pm, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

You can walk on a wooden leg, eat with false teeth, but you can't see shit through a glass eye.
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On 9/19/2010 5:06 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Mine is attached to a hard hat and hearing protectors and a powered dust filter.

Yep. And in variety, don't have a clamp monoculture.
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Yup.
My daughter is a blacksmith. Two or three years ago I was over there and we were cleaning up some work ready for finishing, using angle grinders fitted with wire cup brushes. When a piece of wire from one of those hits your face it really stings so I was using a face shield.
I heard a yell from my daughter, who was just wearing safety spectacles and turned to see her with a piece of wire sticking out at right angles from her forehead. The only thing that stopped it going any further was the bone. It didn't bleed too much but I gather it really hurt.
I have an aversion to pain - and to blood if it's mine - so I always wear a face shield when doing anything where there is a risk of my face getting hit. I also wear a leather apron too, because those bits of wire will easily pass through ordinary clothing and stick in your belly.
The guy she works with is a nurse. He is currently working in mental health but did his time in A&E like everyone else. If you don't wear proper safety gear he will remind you of some of the things he has seen.
You really don't want to know!
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wrote:

I have picked a lot of wires out of myself all over the place. Face, legs, stomach, chest. I should wear a face shield more often. Need to get some new ones, but they seem to get scratched up so fast.
Steve
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"Steve B" wrote:

Compared to your your body?
Lew
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Entire new shield, including headpiece, is about $15 at Lowe's or Home Depot. Replacement visors for same can be procured from Do-It-Best hardware stores for about half that.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

How are they about fog? That's my number 1 complaint about safety goggles when worn with my dust mask. (Do you wear a dust mask when working in the shop?)
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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<puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I've never had a faceshield fog up *at all* when working indoors. The only times I've ever had a problem with fog-up were when I was working outdoors in cold temperatures (e.g. cutting up the tree that took down my power lines a few Decembers back).
I've worn prescription eyeglasses most of my life. I never have a problem with them fogging up either, when I use a faceshield. That used to be a common problem with safety goggles, before I discovered faceshields.
I wear a dust mask in the shop when running a sander, but rarely otherwise.
From my perspective, perhaps the greatest advantage to a faceshield is that it's *so* *easy* to use, so comfortable, so quick to put on, that there is NO excuse for not using it. Just no excuse at all. The one or two times I've been tempted to not use it "just this once" because "it's just one quick cut" I think about how I'm going to explain to SWMBO and kids how I came to be blind in one eye, or missing a few teeth, because I wasn't willing to take TEN SECONDS to put the faceshield on. That'd be a hard explanation to make.
That episode on the chop saw yesterday afternoon woulda HURT, Big Time, if not for the face shield.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in

Sounds like it might be worth trying. As was pointed out, they're relatively cheap (but so are the goggles) and if they'll actually solve the fog problem, I'll be quite happy.

From what I've seen, it seems like the dust mask makes a large contribution to the likelyhood of the goggles fogging. Maybe the shield will be different.

Well, the goggles and muffs only take 10 seconds to put on as well. I get about 30-45 minutes of worktime before the goggles start fogging up.

Always good to find your equipment actually does its job, even if it breaks in the process.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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"Puckdropper" wrote

helmet. The helmet is in pieces, but it did its job. And the cost of replacing said safety equipment is always far less than the alternative.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message wrote:

Dust masks are all over the board, from Kleenex with a rubber band to one with one way valves, to a really good one that seals off and has canisters. Most of the cheapies let air come up between my nose and face and fog my glasses/hood.
Others are just not worth the time for the few seconds you use them, but when you multiply that out, and are dying from emphysema or lung disorder it seems like it wasn't too much to ask. Perhaps if a person had a lot of stock piled up, and they were routing/planing/joining/cutting, it would make sense. Particularly when you are done, and see all the crud all over your face and think, "Gee Golly, I'm glad that didn't go into my lungs."
And then there's the approach of, "I'll just hold my breath and not breathe when it's dusty."
Darwin application comes in mail.
I have had incidents where nothing would have changed the incident or result, and then those where a minor adjustment or preventative measure would have made a very large difference in the outcome.
Who's to know? Do your best. Get good PPE. Use it. Be rational, not wearing a full HazMat suit to palm sand, and try to strike some sensible balance point.
And then you can do everything right and .............
I had to go three times to get metal slivers out of my corneas. EVERY time, I had ANSI approved safety glasses on. Go figger.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Learn how to care for a friend. http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 22:57:34 -0700, "Steve B"

Q&D (Queeks 'n Durrrty) disposables are only $2.99 at HF on sale.
The key to keeping face shield lenses unscratched is to wash them only with soapy water and dry with terrycloth towels. Compressed air works to take dust off while you're working. Use anti-static creme after washing/drying. Keep them in a dust-free cabinet when they're not OVER YOUR FACE. Forgetting to put them away is sure death for them.

Paper dust masks work better with goggles. The goggles crush the tops of 'em and keep 'em from fogging your glasses. Get the type with the exhaust valve. They're not as bad for fogging. Wally World has cheapies in the Mainstays brand which have worked well for me. Hmm, when I checked the brand, I just noticed that they're not NIOSH approved. It makes me wonder if any paper mask is. Since I seldom use them any more, it's not a big concern to me. I've gotten used to silly cones marring my facial features now.

I wear full-time glasses, too, and haven't found a single paper mask which doesn't fog the crap out of my glasses within minutes. I switched to a half-face, silicone rubber respirator decades ago and am glad I did. I swap between 2: one with N-95 dust filters (mowing, woodworking), the other with organic vapor filters (painting, stripping, pest spraying, leafblowing, crawlspace work.) I mow with a mask and muffs, but getting strange looks is much easier than putting up with several days of 5x worse hay fever symptoms each time.

<g> I even wear my respirator when spraying rattle cans any more. Allyou have to do is blow your nose after a 3 minute session to realize that you should have masked-up before spraying even that little bit.

Had you actually done everything right, slivers -couldn't- have found their way into your corneas, Steve. Perhaps you should have switched to a full-face, supplied-air mask after the first time.
-- Some people hear voices. Some see invisible people. Others have no imagination whatsoever.
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You're right. I wasn't there. I didn't see what I saw. I didn't experience what I experienced.
Steve
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 15:59:42 -0700, "Steve B"

Say what you will, but if you got slivers in your eyes, something -wasn't- quite right. Period.
Goggles with 1" diameter vent holes? No lenses? What was it?
-- Some people hear voices. Some see invisible people. Others have no imagination whatsoever.
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wrote

Uvex safety glasses. None of the three was a direct strike, either ricochets, or a sliver falling in and lodging.
What is it with you and this mindset that things absolutely cannot happen in the real world unless you have experienced them, or have some reliable (to you) source.
Crazy shit happens daily in the safety world, but only in the world of those people who can observe what happened and say, "Hmmmmmmmmmmmm," and not in the world of those who say, "Impossible. Can never happen."
The newspapers and Internet are FULL! of crazy events that no one thought possible of plausible, yet happened. Or at least some lying fool claimed it happened, but they are filtered by your extraordinarily intelligent mind to disqualify them from reality.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Learn how to care for a friend. http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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On 9/22/2010 1:58 AM, Steve B wrote:

Safety glasses aren't goggles. If you were wearing "Uvex safety glasses" you were not wearing goggles. Uvex also makes goggles, but they do not call them "safety glasses".
For something to get into your eyes while wearing properly fitted goggles it has to either break the goggles or have been fired at you by Lee Harvey Oswald.

Perhaps if you were more careful with your use of words you would create less confusion. You were wearing safety glasses, not goggles. You either intentionally or through ignorance of the difference sacrificed the protection of goggles for the convenience of safety glasses and paid the price.

However if you had actually gotten something inside goggles it would have been remarkable enough that you'd have a good story to go with it explaining how whatever it was got inside them.

Yeah, they're full of sightings of UFOs and the Virgin Mary too.
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 22:58:49 -0700, "Steve B"

Because 99.999999% of the time, "perfect" wasn't.

Sacre bleu! You refuse to bow and scrape to my magnificence?
-- Some people hear voices. Some see invisible people. Others have no imagination whatsoever.
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