Why does Uniguard go to the right?

I just installed the delta dust collection connector on my Unisaw. Upon receipt of the dust collector connector, I had to call Delta to make sure I understood how to attach it since no instructions are included and it appeared that three screw holes (for which screws are included) are unused and the lower edge of the connector simply sits on the cabinet ramp. They confirmed that this is how it is installed. After I threw out the included screws which are completely unrelated to the dust connector, I wanted to clean out the inside of the saw cabinet so I opened the motor cover as far as I could (not far enough) before it hit the Uniguard pipe.
After attaching the dust connector using the screws, nuts and washers I purchased on my own, I attached the Delta 5" to 4" adapter so that the connector outlet could fit the almost universal 4" dust connector tubing connecting to my dust collector. Since the adapter is quite loose, I may use tape to secure it to the dust connector (slick!).
The dust collection and riving knife on the SawStop saw sure look nice now.
I have two questions: 1. Why doesn't the Uniguard support pipe go to the left of the blade instead of the right? It could be shorter (and cheaper), wouldn't interfere with the motor hatch cover and would be more stable (or lighter with equivalent stability).
2. With these examples of Delta's U.S. design, why is everyone so eager to have the tools manufactured here too?
Mitch Berkson
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"Mitch Berkson" wrote in message

If I understand you correctly, it would make for a lot of unusable space to the left of the saw to have that much pipe sticking out. The Uniguard support is designed to go along the back of any extension wings or table.
IOW, it would just about double the footprint/space requirement for the saw to do that.
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I took a woodworking class at the local high school and they had the Unigard system going to the left. It was the same long dust collection pipe and went over the left of the saw and did not not interfer with large plywood cutting. I believe they did this because this was the best place to put the unisaw and the dust system was on the other side. There were no problems.

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"Jerry" wrote in message

I am not saying it doesn't work, just that it makes for a bigger footprint for the saw.
Fine and good for the local High School, with my taxpayer money ... but, I don't know many folks with enough room in their shops to mount a Uniguard to the left so that you could still cut an 8' sheet of plywood in half.
My bet is they are few and far between, and then only those with a smaller configuration. Hell, the saw wouldn't even fit in my current shop that way, unless you wanted to make a room divider out of it.
When I get a bigger shop, I'll try it and report back ... but keep breathing, ITMT. :)
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On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 12:06:00 -0400, "Mitch Berkson"

Most people rip to the right of the blade and crosscut to the left.
A Uniguard mounted on the left would likely interfere when crosscutting or dadoing wide stock, and using sleds and sliding tables. When ripping, a left mounted Uniguard would limit the off cut side of the cut as well. Mounting the guard to clear maximum rip capacity on right keeps the post out of the way.
Don't forget, an awful lot of new Unisaws come with the motor cover on the left, so motor cover clearance is kind of a moot point.
As far as the dust collector "design flaw", did you do ANY hands-on research before you bought the saw? The Unisaw's connection is no better or worse than that on just about any other saw I've looked at.
Barry
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B a r r y wrote:

Those sound like good reasons.

I assume your quotation marks around "design flaw" are meant to suggest that you think this is somehow not a lame design? Is your only reason for thinking that because other dust collection connectors are equally poor? Do other alternatives come without instructions and with extraneous screws?
When I bought the saw I had looked at a few, though I wouldn't glorify that overmuch by calling it research. Even so, at the time I bought it, dust collection was not a high priority for me, I wouldn't have known what to look for and I would have expected Delta to have some designs which were somewhat better executed than what they have available. As it is, it looks like they had the same perspective about dust collection as I did - first just build the saw and then cobble together some way of handling dust collection.
You should look at the SawStop saw's dust collection arrangement (http://snipurl.com/5xzr ). That looks well designed.
Mitch Berkson
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On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 14:50:01 -0400, "Mitch Berkson"

Yup.
Sometimes, other times, they're four inches from the bottom, with no chute, use 2" connectors, or have louvers next to them.

That's the design DeWalt uses. What happens when you drop the arbor nut or an off cut clogs the hose? <G> I'd much rather dig my arbor nut out of the pile of dust in the bottom of my saw, which is not a Delta, than disassemble hoses.
Really good table saw dust collection happens up top. You'll find that with close or zero clearance inserts, most of the dust ends up on top of the saw anyway. Many folks realize that if some dust sits in the bottom of the saw, it really dosen't mean all that much. Some people don't even bother with bottom end TS dust collection.
Barry
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B a r r y wrote:

Good point. But this could be taken care of by putting a piece of coarse screen (like chicken wire) over the intake.
Maybe you're right about the dust coming out the top. But it seems as if each tooth removes wood going down towards the table especially if the blade is high enough. So conceptually collecting under the table should work since it will remove dust before the blade can spin that gullet of it out the top.
Mitch Berkson
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Mitch Berkson wrote:

I spent over $5k on an unsuccessful patent and don't have the $ to try again anytime soon. But I've often wondered why blowing compressed air over the blade just under the tabletop wouldn't work to get rid of most of the dust that comes out of the top of the TS.
Thoughts?
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

Alternatively, perhaps the teeth could be shaped to shed the sawdust under the table... ;-) At high velocity air acts a lot like concrete...
-- Mark
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On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 18:20:53 -0400, "Mitch Berkson"

You're right, it _should_, but it often dosen't work out that way.
Look here: <
http://www.bburke.com/wood/images/Skinnysledtaper2.jpg
This isn't even with a zero clearance insert, with a short 4" run to a 2hp DC. I clean the saw regularily, note how much dust is on top.
Is the Uni your first table saw?
Barry
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B a r r y wrote:

Yes.
Mitch Berkson
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That's a nice taper jig Barry. Is it a one off or adjustable? If adjustable, how does it adjust?
Art
wrote:

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wrote:

Thanks! Technically, it's adjustable.

Redrill the holes for the screws, the blocks aren't glued. It only takes about 3 minutes to set it up using leg #1 of 5. Ever since I've started making (5) legs for tables, I've never used the fifth! <G>
Barry
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I've filed it under "Inspiration" for when I finally get around to needing a taper jig. Yours sure has those metal contraptions beat by a country mile.
Art

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wrote:

It's MUCH safer and more accurate. The clamps are $7-8 each, so the price is a wash.
However, I didn't invent it, I can't even remember where I saw it first. It may have been in the good ol' Tage Frid book.
Barry
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