Why do chisels have to be sharp?

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I don't worry about the surface rust that develops. It takes a couple of quick wipes to clean them off and they're good to go. I'm of the mind that my tools are tools, not show pieces and they are subject to some of the things that happen to tools. When they need a touch up I just hit them on some sand paper.
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-Mike-
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For some strange reason I don't have a problem with rusted anything in my little Wisconsin shop. Not sure why.
Once I've got a chisel sharp enough to shave with, a few strokes on the five k grit and a few on the 8 k will bring it right back. Maybe ten, fifteen minutes from getting the stones out to putting them away.
Unless I drop it on the floor. Once I pulled a shoulder muscle trying to catch a chisel as it fell off the bench. Didn't catch it. It landed on a canvas toolbag, completey unharmed. And I realized that if I *had* caught it, I probably would have slit the web between my thumb and forefinger.
Since then, I don't worry about it so much.
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wrote:

Don't try to catch sharp things! You may not realize this, but claw hammers claws also tend to be sharp... I picked up one in Menards once, and because of the design it didn't come out of the holder properly, and I tried to catch it. I caught it, but I wished I hadn't.
Puckdropper
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They're also not meant for pulling hardened nails. The inside edges of the claws are sharp so you can grip a nail by its shank, not just its head.
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1 minute.

Felt wheel, green chrome stick.

Use.
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Sharpening is followed by honing, and perhaps by stropping. Tuning up in the middle of a project is done with a ceramic, maybe a minute, including pulling and replacing the stone. The sharpening is a rare thing, coarser honing is once in a while and perhaps five minutes. I do all with the same bevel when I hone, whether an individual chisel needs it or not. I strop the carving tools, don't strop chisels.
I don't store 'em where they'll get moisture and make sure they have none when I return them to the rack.
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20-30 seconds at a pop.

for my at-hand chisels, I keep a 600 grit diamond stone close and touch the edge up before it gets dull. for some specialty chisels I'll go to a finer stone, but they cut pretty well at 600 grit.

I keep 'em dry.
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Does anyone know(or where to find) the equivalent grits between oil, water & ceramic stones, diamonds and sandpaper? Rod
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I believe stones are all reported in CAMI terms, which is to say grains/inch.
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 14:09:09 -0800, "Rod & Betty Jo"

http://www.cs.rochester.edu/u/roche/rec.wood.misc/grit.sizes.html
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wrote:

Even better: http://users.ameritech.net/knives/grits.htm
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wrote:

Thanks much for both links......There's a reason this group is a "must read".... Rod
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Now that someone has given you a link, be aware that comparisons of that type are of very little value. The cutting characteristics are very different between materials.

&
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It is always better to have a sharp chisel to drop on the floor. It would make no sense to nick a dull chisel ???
Mike Dembroge wrote:

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On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 19:41:26 GMT, Pat Barber

Sounds like you've been in my shop.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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On Thu, 22 Feb 2007 23:56:18 GMT, "Mike Dembroge"

Try comparing the two: a sharp chisel and a dull one. It's almost like two different tools. Power tools show less differences: slight bogging down, burned wood, hairy cuts, etc.
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