Why Do Batteries Suck So Much And When Is It Going To Stop?

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Tom Watson wrote:

I use mine too. remodeled my kitchen, two bathrooms, garage, shed, various wood working projects, etc. First couple years after I bought the set I worked installing e911 systems so I screwed various 66 nd 110 blocks and equipment to the walls in the equipment rooms and drilled all kinds of holes to run cables, mine were well used.
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I've got a consumer level Wally world brand 12 volt drill whose battery pack was starting to suck pretty bad after 5 years.
I had it rebuilt for $60 CAD, with a one year warranty, and can't believe the difference.
I've got another cheapo 9.6 volt and will take that pack in next week for rebuilding as well.
--
Life. Nature's way of keeping meat fresh. -- Dr. Who

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I don't know if you pay attention to boring, straight rags like consumer reports but they give a pretty sobering picture about hybrids in this month's issue. They are not what they are cracked up to be. I'm also surprised at the emotional drive over a few miles per gallon. At your 60 miles/day, you could drive a car that gets a real 24 mi/gal with conventional reliable proven gasoline engine and cost $1890/year for gas. Or you could pay a few thousand more for an unproven hybrid and hope it will get the purported 40 mi/gal and save $750/year. That's at $3.00/gal.
'tain't worth it to me.
Bob
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On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 02:18:57 +0000, BillyBob wrote:

I think the point of the hybrids is to reduce the externalized costs of conventional engines. Greenhouse, smog, uppity furriners, that sort of thing. It's hard (for me, anyway) to quantify those other costs, though.
I don't have any battery-powered tools (just scads of small AA-eater gadgets). Just wanted to toss this idea out to you folks who use them: would you find any use for a cranked charger, like the cranked radios? Higher current draw, of course...
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Australopithecus scobis (in snipped-for-privacy@die.spammer.die) said:
| I don't have any battery-powered tools (just scads of small AA-eater | gadgets). Just wanted to toss this idea out to you folks who use | them: would you find any use for a cranked charger, like the | cranked radios? Higher current draw, of course...
I think I sense a great idea coming on: How about attaching the crank directly to the tool so as to eliminate batteries altogether - I think you could make a drill with cranked gearing...or even a drill that is just a chuck attached to a crank.
Some of the tools in this family could even be simple push-pull tools: How about a screwdriver that all you had to do was push-pull on the handle? A push-pull saw or a push-pull jointer (or even a push-pull sander!)
:-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Great ideas, Morris. You could even add a little red lens and magnifying glass and equip those saws with a solar guide!
Iowa retro tools. Gotta love it!<g>
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Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Now you're on to something! ROTFLMAO
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My wife's Prius (a 2001 model, IIRC), really does get in the low to mid 40's. Here's a guy (http://randyrathbun.org/prius/prius_mileage /) who kept track of his gas for 3 years, and averaged 47 MPG (that's probably the newer model, which gets better mileage than the older one my wife has).

I'm not sure what "a few thousand" means, but let's assume you mean $5k. That pays for itself in about 6-1/2 years. That's not a bad ROI.
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... if, and this may be a big "if", you don't have to replace the batteries in those 6 1/2 years. Then the payoff is farther out. Seems like waiting 6 1/2 years is a pretty long time to wait for break-even to me. I certainly would think twice if I was told that an investment would take that long to just break even.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 10:31:54 -0700, Mark & Juanita

I eyeballed a hybrid a couple years ago but lost interest when they said I'd have to replace the batteries every 3-5 years at a cost of more than 8 grand. I sincerely hope that's not true of the newer ones, but it's kept me away from serious consideration ever since.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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The other factor is that a hybrid is a *MUCH* more complex and sophisticated piece of machinery - more things to break, more specialized parts. Early reports of high reliability are just that - early reports. Let's see what happens to them in 5-10 years.
I still love my 1991 Toyota previa with 180,000 miles. My average mainteance cost for last four years has been less than $400/year. I don't need no stinkin' electric motor.
Anyone remember the Cadillac 4-6-8?
Bob
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 19:08:15 GMT, "BillyBob"
That technology is making a comeback: Chrysler has it on the 300C. Cadillac had a good idea that needed some advances in technology to make it work right.
Lee
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BillyBob wrote:

yeah--a true POS. I used to work on those turds.
Dave
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Worse than Caddy's HT4100 aluminum block abomination? You know, the "let's leak coolant into the oil" engine?
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Dave Hinz wrote:

The 4100 was another POS that leaked coolant into the oil because of the ridiculously long intake manifold bolts that were underneath the valve covers. Almost no one bothered to retorque them and hence the leaks. I'd find many of the bolts so loose upon disassembly that I could remove them with my fingers.
Dave
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Hm, I was told it was an o-ring leaking between the steel sleeves and the aluminum block. Or, do those bolts allow that leak? Mind, I'm not saying there aren't more than one problem with the engine. My folks got bit by that one - GM's "fix" was to pour radiator stop-leak into the tank & hope for the best. Oddly enough, next winter, my dad had to buy a new heater core... and then the camshaft became, well, not all that cammy.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

oil would leak past the manifold gasket, at the water passages, after the bolts had lost their torque.
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 19:08:15 +0000, BillyBob wrote:

Just barely.
I have, however, owned two Geo Metros. Very reliable little car, very high mileage. My first long trip in one (4 spd. manual, 3 cyl.) netted 52 mpg, Detroit to Minneapolis ... mostly at speeds clearly not posted. City mileage was about 37 mpg.
It's a good car. Easy to maintain. Needs to come back.
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And, how exactly do they fare in crash tests? If I'm dead, good mileage didn't help me much.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

They actually do decent in crash _tests_ like other small cars since they have such low weight they practically bounce off of the test wall. IN real world crashes they don't do so well.
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