Why Are There So Many Bad Tools?

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need
other
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to
set-up,
mouse
Hmmmmm... isn't that exact what was being said about putting computers in cars 20 years ago - or whenever it was that such stuff was being said. "Cars suffer to harsh of an environment for computers", "cars create too much heat and static electricity for something as complex and delicate as a computer", "all those sensors and stuff...", you know - all that stuff. I'm not forecasting the advent of these things in woodworking next year, but I don't believe the obstacles are that big anymore. Just about everything that could be a worry point for a tool has been addressed by the automotive industry already. Outside of that industry, look at what we already have - lasers that you just throw up on a tripod and they level themselves and shoot remarkably accurate beams for great distances. Accurate enough to perform building layout with. I suspect it's more a matter of demand than capability, that we don't already see more of this stuff today.

ago.
winter
Which makes it a damn good thing you're a messy person and dumped those chisels out instead of fastidiously going through the box looking for just the right one...
--

-Mike-
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Mike Marlow responds:

Well, I am a messy person, but I dumped the box BECAUSE the snake was in it, not to get to the chisels which were right under its middle. He (she?) already seemed less than amused at my disturbing his nap, which made me grateful for temps in the high 30s.
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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"Charlie Self" wrote in message

it,
already
for
A kid who survives growing up in the country on the bio-dense Gulf Coast has learned, among other things, to: never step over a log (snake); never pick up anything on the ground, like a brick, with your bare hand (snake, scorpion); never lean on a tree in the summer (asps); walk around all suspicious depression (yellow jackets); look into the hen house nests before reaching for the eggs (snake, skunk, et al); shine a light into the almost empty feed barrel before trying to scoop out feed (rats and mice), and basically never put any appendage anywhere that you haven't checked out first (all the above, plus).
There are other hazards, but those you only need once to learn.
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Swingman writes:

Heh. Yes, well, I was a city boy originally, but with country parents (Virginia & Kentucky). So I learned. One thing you learn in upstate NY, where rock walls abound, or did 50 years ago, is to not sit with whacking the rocks. Every year, a few hospital emergency rooms get cases of ass bite from copperheads, a snake that is both aggressive and toting a real nasty necrosis causing venom.
Some years ago, I stepped into a depression at the base of a cedar tree I was getting ready to affix a sign to. Never again. Emergency rooms are not fun when they're treating multiple yellowjacket stings that have you at the point where drawing a breath is a huge amount of effort.
We don't have asps or scorpions here or where I was raised.
Gratitude for small things!
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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and out west, never reach up to a rock above your line of sight when hiking or rock climbing. damhikt.

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"Charles Spitzer" wrote in message

hiking
Yep. I learned that one as a ten year while on a geology field trip with my Dad to the central mineral region in Texas, around Llano. There were some BIG rattles snakes on, in and about those rocks. The dinosaur footprints in the river bed were kinda neat, too.
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That's a really pretty area; Mom and Dad lived around there for around 15 or so years after he retired (he from Tx, she from OK). We visited quite a few times ...
Dad used to say: "If it stings, stinks, or sticks ya, it's in Texas".
Regards,
JT
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On Wed, 1 Dec 2004 23:02:58 +0000 (UTC), John Thomas
I thought we were cutting down on the political threads ?
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Dad would've particularly liked your response, as did I. Good thing I wasn't drinking when I read this ...
Regards, JT
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I learned all I needed to know one night in Jackson, MS.
I was at some bar where boats can tie up inside. While waiting for a cab to take me back to my hotel, a beetle the size of a hubcap walked across the parking lot.
That was good enough to chase me back to New England! <G>
Barry
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Charlie Self wrote:

Sure hope that you didn't hurt the snake Charlie. It didn't chew it's way into the box, the mice it had eaten did that. Snakes don't chew. They make good pets though. %-)
Dave in Fairfax
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Dave in Fairfax responds:

The mouse bit makes sense. I don't think I'd care for a snake "pet" at all.
Charlie Self "Giving every man a vote has no more made men wise and free than Christianity has made them good." H. L. Mencken
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On 02 Dec 2004 01:14:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I don't have any pets at present, but I sometimes pet-sit for friends. Between the snakes, the lizards (a green iguana) and the weasels, the snakes are by far the most appealing.
I want a Saw Stop for iguanas.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Man, I hear that. I'd rather get nailed by a medium boa than by a large iguana. I always wear leather gloves with the big ones. Black snakes, in this area are usually common kings or black rats, in other areas they may be indigos or black racers. The kings and indigos tend to be pretty friendly, and good pets, the racers and rats are nippy, but not dangerous.
Dave in Fairfax
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wrote:

It's all pythons round here. A while ago two of us were trying to put a 6' burmese into a 4' tank it didn't want to go into. We _couldn't_ bend it - damn, snakes are strong !
The reticulated python is a pussycat in comparison. Strange how snakes can actually have a personality like this, but I understand it's quite common for the species.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Burmese and Retics both tend to get testy. My daughter's first pet was a Ball we tried to save from a pet store. I put a bunch of Vet money into it but it didn't make it. I've owned large Boas and med retics in the past, helped out in the herp house of a zoo in the Midwest. I quit when it became obvious that I was allergic to the anti-venom. The large king Cobra was just too dangerous to give baths to.
Dave in Fairfax
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Dave in Fairfax wrote:

Pussy.
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"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" wrote:

Ever give a Cobra a bath? You get a horse trough and fill it with tepid water, put the tail of the snake in and draw it under the water. That makes the parasites crawl up the snake towards the nose to stay dry. Snakes like water so it isn't a problem as you work more and more of the snake under water until you pulll the head under. The snake goes ballistic. For some reason it just won't belive that you have its better interests at heart. When you've tgot an annoyed, and now slippery 10' King to deal with, pussy starts to look like a great idea. The guy I was working with told me that the venom isn't too bad, makes you feel kind of spacey and high. I'm an RN, that makes me a control freak (news, huh) spacey and high sounds too much like a loss of control, not even considering the dying part, for me to be interested in trying it out.
Dave in Fairfax
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Blacksnake bite (at least a US blacksnake bite) doesn't even draw blood. Just leaves some toothmarks, and pulling the snake off feels like releasing velcro. DAMHIKT.

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On 01 Dec 2004 09:35:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Properly done this stuff is anything but fragile. We're talking a technology that is already tough enough to be used in artillery shells and can use microengineered materials that start with stuff like diamond-like coatings. A diamond-coated work table anyone? (Not that we'd be likely to use diamond alone for a work table surface because it's too prone to chipping.)
Now when you start talking about stuff like that the first thought is naturally that it will be ungodly expensive. However it won't be at all expensive in another couple of decades. The basic materials (carbon, etc.) are cheap and the costs of producing them are in a nosedive. The cost of putting a layer of near-diamond on something is already so low the stuff is used as a wear coating on hard disk platters.
To give you a reference point, consider a $50 microwave oven. You could have built the equivalent oven 50 years ago, including the control system. But it would have cost hundreds of thousands of dollars even in quantity. The notion of using a dedicated computer to control a single kitchen appliance would have stuck folks as insane in 1954.

Most of the problems in those comparisons have to do with accuracy, which in turn is achieved by rigidity in modern designs. That in turn requires a combination of mass of material, careful manufacturing to close tolerances and good design. With MEMS-based designs the first goes away, the second drops to extremely low cost, leaving only the third component -- good design -- which should be cookbook technology by that time.

Like the 1954 microwave oven building such a device with today's technology (if we even could) would be both extremely expensive and absurdly fragile. It would suffer from all the problems you point out and then some. (Recalibration anyone?) The point is that we're well on the way to dealing with those problems with the development of MEMS and related technologies.
Micro devices are tough, by their very nature. MIT has built micro turbines for jet engines out of silicon that spin faster and can handle much higher temperatures that conventional full-size engines. The result is incredible power-to-weight ratios. (Want to build a flying skateboard a la 'Back To The Future 2'? The researchers figured it would take an array of about 500 of these micro-jet engines, each less than an inch square.)

You don't usually find either snakes or mice in computers. And even if you did, would it matter? Okay, mouse shit in the fans might be a problem and mouse piss in the power supply would provide its own distinctive aroma. But still . . . --RC

You can tell a really good idea by the enemies it makes
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