Who originated the "Forrest WWll Blade" ?

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For those of you that are not happy with either the quality or the service that Forrest is putting out these days please READ ON! I have been a Forrest user for over 30 years and have no complaints about them. They do make a good blade. However, I have been reading postings recentely about dis-satisfied customers complaining about one thing or another.
About two years ago I needed to go to Fall River, MA to buy a few 10" saw blades for a new table saw in addition to my 16" Tannewitz XJ which I use in the mill for most work but has a 1 1/8" stub arbor and 14" diameter blades. While going through the selection of blades an older gentleman approached me and before you know it I was listening to this man for almost an hour talking about saw blades and his years experience in making them. He was the founder of the store called "Burns Tools" which began in 1934. He is a master saw blade maker who has many years of experience. He was talking to me about hand hammering blades which is an art long gone. I was facinated with Mr. Burns as he is a walking encyclopedia on this subject.
Now here is the best part> This man IS THE INVENTOR of the saw blade that "Forrest" sells as the WoodworkerII. I cannot remember exactly how Marshall's innovative idea got into the hands of the Forrest folks but it did and they have capitalized on his idea for years now. It's a shame. Anyway, he, his sons and grandson run BurnsTools in Fall River, MA. They sell power tools and supplies to the construction trades. In their factory, they also custom make the exact saw blade that Forrest makes in addition to other styles. If you are looking for another source of excellent saw blades I strongly recommend that you check them out on their website <burnstools.com> or call them @ 508-675-0381. Their store is located at 350 Mariano S Bishop Blvd. in Fall River, MA 02721. Tell them that Charles of Charles & Son sent you. You will not be disappointed. Their service dept. for sharpening is tops and their turn around time is one week. Ask for Marshall Burns, he is a wonderful man and a pleasure to talk with. All of the folks there are super people as well.
Cheers, Gusty
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Sounds like the guy who sold Bill Gates the rights to DOS!
I just want to go on record as being a satisfied cusomer of Forrest blades, contrary to what you suggests in the first paragraph.
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"Never Enough Money" wrote in message

Likewise ... I own 2 Forrest WWII's, and a Forrest ChopMaster. My older WWII just got back last week from Forrest after its third sharpening, and it cuts like new. My "customer satisfaction" has not diminished one iota.
FWIW, I also own a Freud GlueLine Rip, and a couple of other 10" blades accumulated down through the years, and I still go back to a Forrest as a first choice.
That said, I would love to try one of the Burn's 10" 40 tooth just to make a comparison ... my bet is that it is indeed a good blade. If I win the lottery, I'll let you know.
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Did you see the show on Discovery about the Seattle computers/Microsoft/IBM computer deal to? How would you like to be that guy, knowing Gates became a zillionaire off of your program that he bought for, what was it?, $10,000 IIRC?!! And you are still there peddling your computers out of the local mall! Greg
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Greg O wrote:

The total value of the deal, according to "the guy", Tim Paterson, was about $75,000. Bear in mind that Paterson didn't have IBM on the hook and this was very likely a "make or buy" decision. CP/M just wasn't all that complex an OS, in fact it was really just a glorified system monitor that could have been written by any number of college students (something with roughly equivalent functionality is often assigned as a class project at the sophomore or junior level) so if Paterson hadn't dealt Microsoft would probably have just written it in house and he wouldn't have gotten _anything_ out of it.
He doesn't seem to be particularly unhappy about it. One kind of wishes that he'd held out for some residuals, but so it goes. None of the original Star Trek cast gets anything out of Trek, Diana Rigg doesn't get anything out of The Avengers, sad stories abound.

Actually last I heard he was working for Microsoft.

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<<He doesn't seem to be particularly unhappy about it. One kind of wishes that he'd held out for some residuals, but so it goes. None of the original Star Trek cast gets anything out of Trek, Diana Rigg doesn't get anything out of The Avengers, sad stories abound.>>
Unless you count their subsequent careers. Most of the cast of the original Star Trek would most likely have faded into showbiz oblivion by now. So even if they received limited residual income from the original series, there are the 6 or 7 Star Trek movies they got to star in, the numerous conventions they are paid to participate in, and probably even a fair percentage of the non-Trek-related roles they have gotten are the result of the show's cache.
Lee
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J. Clarke wrote:

Yeah, and it was more advanced than DOS. I've used 'em both, and I'd take CP/M every time.
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Joe User wrote:

So how do you make a directory in CP/M?
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Last I heard he was still peddling computers, shop name Seattle Computers. Greg
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Greg O wrote:

Actually, the "shop" was a manufacturer and it was called "Seattle Computer Products" and if that's the last you heard you haven't heard anything in a very long time, because he worked for Microsoft for a while, quit, and went back to work for them in 1990 and has been there ever since.

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Could be, but the show I saw had him on a interview and he said it was $10,000. He had licensed Microsoft to sell his DOS program at $1,000 a copy, but did not ever think he would ever sell 10 copies so $10,000 was a great deal! It has been 3-4 years since I saw the show, so my figures may be a bit rusty. Greg
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Greg O wrote:

The company that Paterson founded <http://www.patersontech.com/ has a Web site with several articles that he wrote about this. The initial deal was $10,000 plus $15,000 for each OEM customer. That was $25,000 up front. Later, just before the PC was announced, Microsoft bought it outright for $50,000. Later there was a lawsuit such that SCP ended up getting over a million dollars, but that wasn't really part of the "deal".

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wrote:

There's lots of folks in similar situations.
The idea is a small part of it, the marketing and execution of the idea is the bigger part. Michael Dell didn't invent mail order computers, Henry Ford didn't invent the car, Ray Kroc (McDonald's) didn't invent fast food. They all came up with better ways to make and/or sell the item.
Heck, the McDonald brothers were happy with one location and Ray Kroc was a milkshake machine salesman who bought the rights to the concept and name. <G>
Barry
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Gusty wrote:

Where?
Barry
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My first forest WWII was slightly off, promptly replaced at no cost. Second blade is still very wonderful, but needs a pitch bath.
Alan
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Gusty wrote:

Not hardly...
Don't doubt your Mr. Burns is an interesting ol' coot, but he's not absolutely unique...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Circular blades for sawmills still have to be hammered left or right handed depending on which side of the blade the log carriage is on. Sam
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You apparently mistook my meaning...I was pointing out that hammering is <not> such a "long gone" art as the OP seems to think. Any <good>refurb shop will have the capability as well as quality manufacturers.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Circular blades for sawmills still have to be hammered left or right handed depending on which side of the blade the log carriage is on. Sam
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1-As I expected, there are those that must take any kind of an article no matter how positive, pick it apart and look for some arguing point or a negative comment to make. All I stated was that 1- I was a satisfied customer of Forrest and 2- that I was directing my plug for Burns Tools to those that were not happy with Forrest and or those looking for another source of an equally or better blade or service. 2- As for the art of hammering, let me give an example of an instance that may prove both humorous and helpful. One day I took my dad to the most exclusive men's store in my area to pick up a suit jacket that I had to have altered. Upon receiving it and putting it on, my dad noticed that there was a slight imperfection on the back side of the shoulders. The salesman said that he would call the "taylor" out to check on it. The taylor arrived and began to examine the jacket. He stated: "what's wrong with it?" Because I had it on I could not see the area in question but my dad pointed it out to the taylor at least twice. The taylor stated again that there was nothing wrong with it and made it appoint to tell us that he was the taylor, as though we or at least my dad did not know what he was talking about. WRONG. My dad was an older Italian who came from a city of taylors that made both his and his brother's suits by hand for years. Kaps of Lawrence and Louies of Boston. He knew what "tayloring" was all about because he was used to the best. My dad was very patient with this man and showed him where the fault was and the taylor became irritated at us because we questioned him. Remember that we are the customers and that we were in a very expensive store. Well when the taylor was finished, my dad said to him...."You call yourself a taylor? All the taylors are dead. All you are is an alterator." We left without the coat. I should have gone to Kaps or Louies. A lot of their clothes are imported from Italy and France where the art of tayloring was still in existance. This was around 1981.
I am sure that there are some good taylors remaining in this country somewhere but they are far and few. This is an art and most people today are not interested in the tayloring business as it once was in its hayday back in the old days. That era was replaced with mass production where the personal touch had been taken away. Old timers like dad that were used to high quality clothing could not accept the average suit found in most stores so they kept going to to places like Kaps or Louies and paid the price for fine tayloring. Most American manufactures of high end clothing then had to import Italian taylors to work in their factories along with immigrants from other countries that had the talent to produce fine men's suits.
Now again, a lot of you will see the point here but there will be those that will disect this apart and make all kinds of negative statements. SO WHAT!
Point is that there may be some fine "hammerers" out there somewhere but the majority of them are long gone. This is what I meant. I only wanted the group to recognize this older man who is responsible for the blades that most of you use even though it may be a Forrest or a Freud or whatever. Don't get so picky will ya? Life is too short. I am older that most of you here I am sure and because I raised two boys I know what it is to listen to them tell me how old fashioned I am and that they know more that good old dad. BULL. Wait until they get to be my age. Then they'll get it and so will some here. Cheers again, Gusty
Duane Bozarth wrote:

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