Which receptacle ?


Hello:
Advice needed from persons owning one or more 220 VAC powered pieces of woodworking equipment. I have almost completed my workshop. 20' X 22' with 10' ceilings.
Electrical as it relates to 220 VAC outlets:
(14) 220 VAC outlets - wired with 10 gauge - 30 amp breakers.
My dilemma. Is there one receptacle out there that would be common to most 220 VAC powered tools ?
What I have considered doing is wire nutting, taping & covering each box until I purchase the piece of equipment that would be located there. Then buy the appropriate receptacle to match the plug on the newly acquired piece of equipment.
Problem: The original reason for so many receptacles was to be able to rearrange the shop in any configuration. But that would require one style of receptacle on every outlet. Then I would just simply attach a plug to match on any new piece of equipment purchased.
Problem: The receptacles need a 30 AMP minimum rating since I am using 30 AMP breakers. Well, all the receptacles I found at the "BORG" that meet this criteria are either dryer receptacles or oven receptacles. It appears the only way to get a plug to fit would be with an integral pigtail.
Any suggestions appreciated . . . . Steve
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Not sure why you need a 30amp breaker, but all my tools and compressor use Cooper 1876W-single receptacle/20a-250v;2pole.3wire grounding receptacles.
Searcher
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I foolishly over designed . . . I have 30AMP breakers for all my 220 VAC outlets . . . code requires receptacle to be rated as high or higher than breaker . . .
Thanks for info . . I realize now I should have gone with 15AMP or 20 AMP breakers & changed the one or two on off chance I needed it . .
I think I'm going to go with 6-30R receptacles & 6-30P plugs . . . . . if I am forced to install to get final inspection . . . If the inspector will let me wire nut, tape and cover I can do like you did as needed . . .

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a 5 HP single phase saw. Jim
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Thanks LOL LOL

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A 3HP saw only requires a 20 amp circuit and I believe a 5HP saw will be fine on a 30 amp circuit.
Brian Elfert
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writes:

what the equivalent circuit breaker would be, The starting current for a single phase motor is quite a bit more than the rated amperes for the motor, but of course that peak only lasts for a very short time.
They don't say what the circuit breaker or fuse size should be for a 3 hp motor.
No matter what, the OP should consult an electrician for this kind of question rather than the mighty mass of misinformation that is called the internet. Jim
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Whatever you do, I would put new plugs on all tools and make the receptacles match. this way a tool can be moved with changing the receptacle.
Personally, I would use L6-30 plugs and receptacles since you went for 30 amp.
Brian elfert
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On Wed, 24 May 2006 14:17:41 -0500, "Petrified Woodworker"

Wirenut all the boxes but the end one on the strings and install a 6-30 in that one. That should make the inspector happy. Later you can add what you need. It is really a code violation to put a 6-20 on them but since you are plugging in motor loads the issue may get resolved in article 430.
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15 years, lots of use, no problems.
Dave
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Not, I hope, all on the same circuit. You did say breakers (plural)...

http://frentzandsons.com/Hardware%20References/plugandreceptacleconfiguratio . htm
Scroll down to the 30A devices. The one you want is the top one in that section, the NEMA 6-30R. It's pretty commonly used. That, and the 6-20R right above it, for 20A circuits.
Assuming those 14 outlets are on several different circuits -- and if not, they should be -- you might consider changing the breaker for one or two circuits to 20A (leaving the 10ga wire in place) and using NEMA 6-20R receptacles there to gain more flexibility in what machines you put where.

Not much of a problem, really -- the 6-30R and 6-20R will probably accomodate nearly any 240V shop tool you might want to buy.

No, you just need to go somewhere else. Among the major home center chains, only Menards will have those receptacles -- but any real hardware store (e.g. Ace, True-Value, Do-It-Best, etc) will probably have some of those, and any electrical supply house will *definitely* have them.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 24 May 2006 22:42:08 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

I found them at Lowes, here in west-central NJ.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
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Thanks - heading there tomorrow . . .

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All my 240V tools came with no plugs attached - but, I don't know if this is typical.
I found that most of the 30A straight blade receptacles are really large, and expensive - especially at the big box stores. They may even require a larger than nominal device box. And the matching plugs are *honkin'* big, too. I didn't want those big plugs hanging around while not using the tools. The chance of dropping on the floor and cracking the plug housing was another dissuasion for using these.
A little shopping around on ebay found some NEMA L6-30R and L6-30P twistlock units - I got 8 of each for under $60 shipped, all from the same merchant. They were salvaged from a demolished data center, but entirely suitable for re-use in my shop. And the twistlocks are much more compact than the straight blade devices. I have four installed in wall boxes, and made an extension cord with a leftover plug and one inline receptacle.

You'll need to pigtail the cables in the device boxes anyway - go ahead and make them up with nuts on the pigtails, then install only the receptacles you need. The rest can come as you change layout and need the location, or buy more tools.
Hope this helps, John Sellers
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Lowes carries a stock of L6-30R&P.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Some of mine did, some didn't.

Right -- that's because you're looking at dryer and/or range receptacles and plugs. NEMA 6-20R and 6-30R are a normal size.

Sounds like a pretty good deal.

Ya done good.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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