Which One: Finish-Nailer, Brad-Nailers, Pinner?

I am planning to get a nail-gun for doing woodworking. But I am not sure which type to get. I would like to ask a couple questions to learn more before buying one:
- What's the difference between finish-nailers and brad-nailers. I assume finish-nailers are good for finishing work, and may be good for woodworking. But finish-nailers look must bulky than brad-nailers. They look like something for heavy duty work. Does this mean that brad-nailers are more suitable for woodworking than finish-nailers?
- I would like to do these types of woodworking: o Cabinets o Bed frame o Dining table o Outdoor furnitures and flower boxes What's the best "first" nail-gun for these types of woodworking? Will it be a brad-nailer, a pinner, or a finish-nailer?
Thanks in advance for any info and comments.
Jay Chan
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Jay,
I have both a finish nailer and a brad nailer. In all honesty, I don't use these much for "woodworking". I use them to install chair rail, crown molding, etc. I don't know that I have ever used my finish nailer on a woodworking project...but that's me. I have used my brad nailer...especially when I install molding on my projects. So, IMHO, I would start with a brad nailer if I was going to use it on the projects you listed.
Bill

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On Wed, 24 Dec 2003 14:06:45 GMT, "WORSS"

A great "woodworking" use for nailers, in my eyes, is quick jig assembly. Cut the parts, wham, wham, wham! Use the jig! <G>
Otherwise, I'm with you. I use them more for finish carpentry than true "woodworking".
Barry
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Jay,
The finish nailer is the heavier nailer out of the two. it drives larger nails (most often clipped head) and uis useful for outdoor furniture and flower boxes and some cabinet work and general household construction. A brad nailer is useful for tacking smaller moldings, pinning jigs and joints to hold them while the glue sets up. You will likely find, over time, that you need both!
Amazon.com has a good deal on at present where you get a free brad nailer if you buy a Senco Finish Nailer. For a review of the Senco 41XP Finish nailer, have a look here: http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/sencoxp41.htm
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 5 Reviews: - Workshop Essentials Under $30 - Festool PS 300 Jigsaws - Delta Universal Tenoning Jig - Ryobi Reciprocating Saw - Infinity Router Bits ------------------------------------------------------------
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Brads are thinner and usually shorter than finish nails. I u se brads for tacking thing while the glue sets. I may put a brad or two to hold two pieces together and then screw then for real holding power. They work ats a "third hand" at time to hold stuff.
Nailers are better suited for crown moldings or actual assembly of projects. Faster than scews, they have a place. I don't have one yet and have lived without it so far.
I do have a crown stapler though. I bought it for a particular reason and now that I have it, I do use it. Stronger than brads. More visible than nails or brads, but good holding power from the crown. I u se them where they are not visible, like tacking the back of a bookcase in place.

Depends on how you like to build things. I use the brads as described above, but I prefer screws, or dowels to hold things together. Maybe that makes me some sort of snob. Maybe it is because I don't have the nail gun. For a birdhouse, nails are fine, for a table, IMO, I like other methods.
In any case, they are handy tools, but furniture was built for centuries before the pneumatic gun was invented. For flower boxes, I'd go with a nailer first. For a dining table, I'd go with screws. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Thanks for the info and advice on nailers.
Seem like I should start with a brads nailer for the purpose of holding thing together (I work alone and I really like to use it as a third hand).
I doubt I will use a finish nailer because I plan to use other ways for fastening (such as screws and dowels and biscuits).
Thanks again for all the good advices and comments that I have received here.
Jay Chan
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Sounds like you need a finish nailer. Some shoot 15 gauge nails from 5/8 long to 2 1/2 inches long. Mine is an old Senco SFN 2. I also have a pinner, I use the finish nailer most.

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Jay If you decide on a brad nailer, be sure to get one that will shoot 2" brads. I got the 1.25" Porter Cable because it was $40.00 cheaper--bad move. The nailer works great on most everything I do but occaisionally wish I had the extra length--bigger IS better!!
Roger size matters

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On 26 Dec 2003 08:31:53 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (roger) wrote:

I prefer 16 gauge finish nails as they get longer. 18 ga. brads seem to deflect too much as they get much longer than 1 1/4", especially in hardwoods.
Barry
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Yes, I have ordered a Senco combo kit that comes with a brad nailer that can shoot 2" brads max. This means I get this covered. Thanks for the info that confirms my choice is alright.
Now, I just need to look for a finish nailer that uses the least air (because the air compressor that I have ordered only has 1-gal air-tank), and I am all done.
Jay Chan
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Jay, Unless you're going to be popping off finish nails at a really fast rate, like one right ater the other...don't worry about trying to find a low consumption gun. None of the finish nailers will use so much air that you will overtax even a small compressor.
Unless you are a pro doing finish work in construction, your air consumption won't be very much with even a large finish nailer like the angled PC, Senco or similar. Just make sure your compressor has enough PSI to run the gun.
Terry Sumner
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This is great news to me. This means I will have an easier time in selecting a finish nailer than in selecting an air compressor (it is a Senco small and ultra quiet air compressor with a 1-gal air tank).
Thanks.
Jay Chan
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