Which nailer for floor moulding?


Just finished a wood floor project and I have lots of walls to install moulding on. In the past Using hammer and nails would take a lot of banging to get the job done, which would be the right pneumatic nailer to get...brad or finish nailer and what length?
Thanks in advance
Gil
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Probably a 15 or 16 gauge finish nailer for baseboards, with approx. 2" nails. 18 gauge for shoe molding.
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I think you're better off installing the primary moulding to the wall with regular finish nails and then using the pneumatic gun for the quarter round on the floor and the decorative moulding on the top. That's for a traditional three piece built-up moulding. The finish nails are a much heavier gauge than the pneumatic nails, you can snug up the board and know you've hit the stud. How much time do you really save using a nailgun? With the little stuff the guns have an advantage over fiddling with tiny nails and possibly splitting the moulding. I've been using pneumatic guns since the late 1970s but sometimes I think we've gone overboard on their use.
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round
You can get pnuematic guns that fire 2"x10' nails. Do that with your hammer.

Lots.
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However most pneumatic fastener substitutions are far lighter in terms of shank size than the manual nails they replace, particularly in finish nails. Usually doesn't matter, sometimes it does. There is also less choice in terms of length and more tendency to compromise based on what's loaded in the gun.
I have about ten nailguns/staplers. I'm not against them in general, there are just some things they aren't good for.

When there are lots of nails to be driven, yes.

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'Scuse me, but what the heck is your baseboard TRIM holding up that a 6d nail, spaced (let's say) 2 per every 16", won't hold it secure against the wall. Or, is it that warped that you need the industrial fastener? Or?

Indeed.
Renata

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hammer.
I don't think I could. Pretty sure that around here I couldn't find two pieces of wood I'd need a 2"x10' nail to fasten...
-- Morris (In Iowa where those kind of trees don't grow)
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I guess that depends on how much you have to do. If I have a couple of pieces to nail I might nail them by hand. Since I'm probably going to have to nail base in an entire house, I can't imagine doing it by hand and I'd probably cut my wages in half by doing so.
Mike O.
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The 16-guage finish nailer is more popular since the nails are cheaper and the head is smaller. 2" should work for the baseboard. For the quarter-round, 18-guage brads with a length of 1-1/4" should be sufficient. The smaller guage heads are almost invisible and are less likely to split the trim.

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2" 18 ga brads are nasty, unpredictable things when they go astray. You need to be able to get to the framing, through the drywall or plaster, and have some holding power (depth). So the step up from the $100 brad nailer to the $160 finish nailer is probably required.
Prices at HF much lower. Quality assurance variable.
DAMHIK about the 2" brads.
Patriarch
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2-1/2" nails, 15ga angle nailer works perfectly for baseboard.
Dav
gil wrote:

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I think brad is fine for molding, personally I'd go 1/2" over the width of molding you could go less dependent on quality and weight of molding (warp and twist). With molding, I'd usually end up slipping and dinging the wood with a hammer. What I do now is I drill holes every 16 inches and set screws no more nails for the base board, I was going to plug the holes, but found it looked "interesting" not too. Then shoot nails for the cap and shoe.

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Not to get TOO far OT, but why 1/4 round (shoe)? Allways looked to me like someone was too lazy to remove the baseboard when installing a hardwood floor, and just tacked on some shoe moulding. I know, I know, you need more coverage for an expansion space than traditional moulding will cover. Why not use, or make, thicker moulding? Anyone visiting my place will see what appears to be traditional moulding, but it's really 1/2 x 2 with a bevel ripped into the face and a round over at the top. I let the flooring guys spend the 3 days on their knees, but I insisted on installing the moulding myself.
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