which is better 120 or 240

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I have watched these too. I get that 240 is better but not enough better to spend a whole lot of money for it. If you have 240 and it is easy to hook up, do it.
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to
up,
That is a great point! I have plenty of 240 available so there is no cost factor.
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At 240v the saw will use 1/2 the current compared to 120v, so the power is the same (V*I). However, lower current will mean less voltage drop in the feed wires, and less heating in the wires and motor. (This is also assuming that you're making the proper connection in the saw; if you run 240 with the saw at set 120, it will double the power, at least until the wires fry..)
That being said, I would agree with one of the other posters; if you don't have easy access to 240 already, stick with 120, assuming it's already there. If you're doing new wiring, wire both into the area and use 240 for the stuff that can take advantage of it and leave 120v outlets for everything else.
Mike O.
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I'm approaching this from the supposition that the OP is a hobbyist in his own home.
I thought every home had 220 available to it through the fact that the drop from the utility pole is two hot leads and a neutral. The two hot leads each power a row of breakers in the service panel. A 220 breaker simply attaches to both leads.
When I got a tool that said to plug it in to 220, all I did was buy the neccessary electrical stuff (breaker, 12ga. wire, conduit, ect.) to make it happen. It was easy. It might have cost 20 or 30 bucks to do. I used the advise of people that know how and read over two different books on wiring a house for the subject of adding an outlet. I am not an electrician but can follow instructions.
Keep in mind it is a little technical to do this, get an electrician to do it for you if your uncomfortable or want someone else to blame if it all goes bad. Even using an electrician won't be all that much $.
On Sat, 3 Apr 2004 01:09:29 -0500, "Mike O."

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I was referring to the availibility of 220 in the shop area. In my garage/shop, there's a couple of 120 circuits, plenty of outlets, but no dedicated 220 run. I don't have anyhing that has to have 220 (at least not yet..) It wouldn't be impossible to run it, but it would be a hassle.
Based on the way I understood the original posters needs, I wouldn't think it would be worth the trouble to run a new line to his shop if he already had 120. Of course, I can't see his setup; if it's an easy run from the breaker panel to the shop, and he's willing (and able) to add the circuit, he could go for it. I just figured his expected needs and the benefits he would get from 220 for just one tool probably wouldn't be worth too much trouble to add.
Mike O.

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OK, first of all I am new at this stuff. Second, I do have an electric dryer in the area that is 220 so adding the breaker and running line for an outlet should be relativly easy for me. I was just curious as to what would make my saw run more efficient.
Searcher1

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wrote:

Then I'm sorry, I didn't say about whether your existing saw would run more efficiently.
Since I'm not an electrician and cannot remark about relative efficiencies derived from calculation, I can say that if it were me, I'd try it both ways (wiring it 110 & then 220) and comparing the performance of the saw when cutting wood.
My original remarks came from running 220 over to my jointer. My jointer required 220. I'm happy as a pig in slop with that. It's SO much better than the old one. Never bogs down. To put it to an automotive analogy, it was like trading up to a Corvette from a Geo Metro.
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split the difference and run it at 180 <g>
randy

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277 single-phase, if you can't manage 440-delta.
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wrote:

240 - I don't know how you 'mericans even keep the light bulbs working on that piddly little 110V stuff.
Mind you, these new metric volts are smaller anyway.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

There are 130 volt light bulbs. When used at 120 volts, they provide longer life, but less output (lumens).
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