Which HVLP

So Im Lost, I do a fare bit of woodworking, Beds, High Boys, night stand etec and Im tired of finshing everything by hand. Now Im in the market for an HVLP. The question is, which is best for my needs. I would use it to spray sanders sealer and poly, mabey some stain now and then. Im looking at the FUJI Q3 for $600 but is there a better cheaper unit out there?
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A friend of mine has used one of these in his small production shop for over a year and loves it. Only $400.00 with shipping! http://www.lemmer.com/t55-hvlp-turbine.htm
Good luck,
AZCraig

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Love my Fuji but, then again and to be fair, I don't ever remember seeing a post from anyone knocking any of the major brands.
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Mike G.
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Although not an expert, I have learned a few things about HVLP. First, heat is your enemy. The less expensive units get real hot and that sends hot air down the hose. This is bad. Hot air comming out of hose causes 1 of the 3 components of your product to start drying before it hits the wood. A hot gun is uncomfortable to hold. If you are spraying 1 table leg, a single motorcycle fender or otherwise a small surface, then the less expensive units might do. But try spraying your wifes bureau in 1 even coat and your hand will burn off. The pre-drying issue is more prominent with enamels and laquers. I sprayed 2 motorcycle fenders in a row and I had to redo the second. It just did not have the same sheen and depth of the 1st. This is yet another example of you get what you pay for. Tom.

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Not in my experience.either with the Fuji or a $200.00 CH unit/
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Mike G.
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Thanks for the advice...how about some bottom line recommendations...which one
Thanks Jeano
> > > So Im Lost, I do a fare bit of woodworking, Beds, High Boys, night > stand > > > etec and Im tired of finshing everything by hand. Now Im in the market > for > > > an HVLP. The question is, which is best for my needs. I would use it > to > > > spray sanders sealer and poly, mabey some stain now and then. Im > looking at > > > the FUJI Q3 for $600 but is there a better cheaper unit out there? > >
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What can I say, I own a Fuji so I recommend a Fuji.
Does that mean any other unit on the market is deficient in some way? Nope it doesn't. As near as I can tell if a unit puts out around 80 CFM at 4 or 5 PSI at the nozzle and has the correct nozzle/needle combination it will spray as good a coat or normal woodworking stains and finishes as you are capable of.
The last part is the kicker. HVLP isn't a magic wand that will give a perfect finish it does take a certain amount of practice and familiarization.
The more money you spend the better the parts are which means longevity and versatility in what can be sprayed.
From what I have been able to determine from the posts here by the owners of the under $100.00 Rockler and Harbor Freight units they do a pretty good job. Of course I wouldn't expect those units to survive under a heavy spraying regiment nor be able to spray anything heavier then properly thinned lacquer but, with in limits, the owners seem to be pretty happy with them.
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Yea, I bought the $80 turbine HVLP from HF. It comes with 3 needle sizes but only one cup. You can get a 3 year no-questions asked warrenty for about $20 that will even cover you if you forget to clean it. The unit works reasonably well for easy to spray material. I've had good luck with shellac but terrible results with WB lacquer. Also, I don't notice a lot of heating from it. I later bought a HF conversion HVLP gun that is non- bleeder and has more adjustment. It's easier to put on a better finish with this than the turbine setup, though it keeps my little compressor running. I'd have to spray a lot to justify the additional cost of a Fuji or similar when you can get good results for < $100.
Matt
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I was in the same place as you are about 2 weeks ago, and I bought a Turbinaire 1235 with accessory kit at the Wood show in NJ. I just used it to spray oil base primer on 4 75" x 36" bookshelve units and 4 base cabinets, and 20 removable shelves. It takes practice, but after the second unit I got much better. No issue with heat, the gun is well made, but I think that i have to experiment with the needles and caps to get the overspray down a bit. Based on first impressions, the unit performed well. The advantage, and I did use it, to the Turbinaire unit is that the speed of the turbine is adjustable, as opposed to the Apollo (I don't know if the Fuji is adjustable or not), and allowed me to vary the spray a bit. None of these units is cheap, and I seem to think if you go with a Fuji, Apollo or Turbinaire you will likely be pleased.
Now, everybody tell me I made the wrong choice with Turbinaire!! :-)
good luck
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I don't think you made the wrong choice. ;)
Of course, I have that exact one you have - the Turbinaire 1235.. I like it and have used it with oil base on shutters, which made the gun a real pain in the butt to clean afterwards, nitrocellulose on guitars (the main reason I bought it), and a nice garden bench. It perhaps is not a machine for everyone, because, as you say, you do have to play with it to get it right. But then, of course, the beauty is that you can play with it to get it right, and when you get it right it's a breeze.
Take a periodic peak at the Force Machinery home page. Last spring they had a rep from Turbainairre come and give a demonstration that lasted a couple of hours. It was very informative, and they offered discounts on the water based lacquers and accessories afterwards as well.
Geoff Morristown,NJ

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Just for informational purposes, the Fuji allows you to control the volume of air through a gate on the hose.
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Mike G.
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I have been using the Apollo conversion gun for the last 4 years. I like it. I have sprayed 30 - 40 gal of various paints with it. I have used it to spray shellac, poly, enamel, conversion lacquer, and stains very successfully. My 2 hp Sears air compressor supplies all the air volume I ever need for it. If you already have an air compressor large enough to run a high pressure paint gun, I think this is the way to go. I found that I did need to purchase the additional tips for the gun that are offered as an accessory to be able to spray a variety of finishes. I have not had good results spraying latex paints even though the accessory kit contains a tip and larger air cap for these thicker paints. The gun is relatively easy to clean up. All of its wet parts are made out of stainless steel and they have held up very well to the wear and cleaning over the last several years. I have had good service from their customer service department in replacing consumable gaskets and seals for the gun which will have to be replaced ocassionaly if the gun is used very much.

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jeano -
One comment that I didn't see here. I prefer a non-bleeder gun over a bleeder. Non-bleeders stop the flow of air when you let go of the trigger (like standard spray guns). Wagner makes all their sprayers with NB guns and I recently saw that Fuji is shipping their units with one too. Bleeder guns continue to allow air to flow through them even after you release the trigger, which while not a huge problem, always bothered me.
Hope that helps.

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I have a Fuji with a bleeder. I'm used too it and don't find it a major problem but I have to agree that the non bleeder would be preferable if there is an option.
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