Which gauges for TS alignment ?

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Last chance to get on board. Interspersed.

WRONG - The wood is held tightly against the fence prior to the cut, and the direction of feed is parallel to the blade. If you look at the wood, it's actually free of the fence, where it _might pinch and kick back_ off the blade.

Only if YOU have the brains of a gnat and and reach behind the blade. The rest of us read the books - the same ones that tell of a pinch relief (did you read the instructions for the Jet-Lock on your UA100?) - and know that no pressure is ever applied after the cut. The piece unrestrained.
Now, in a non-nit-picking world, if it gets touched by a tooth, it has room and the tendency to to move laterally out of the way. If you provide relief on the fence side, within limits, the same condition pertains to the dimension piece.

You could try using your eyes to observe what's happening at your saw.

Or you're not through-cutting?
I can see you missed that, even though it was explicitly stated - there is geometrically only one point which defines the width of a piece passing between a cutting object and a fixed obstacle. With the router, it's the easily observed point of tangency, which is why it's a clear analogy, with the tablesaw, it is the point at which the leading tip of the blade exits the wood - unless you're foolish enough to allow it to pinch between the fence and the rising teeth thereafter....

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George, George ... didn't you learn a damn thing in High School? You're not on "the list", dude. Now go back to your bench and practice a little veneration and homage.
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George wrote...

George, you're not making sense. It doesn't happen the way you describe it -- unless your fence is bent or if you don't use it to guide the workpiece. Otherwise, if the wood doesn't bend when cut (yeah, big if), then the work stays against the fence for its entire length. The gap occurs between the workpiece and rising teeth of the blade, not between the workpiece and the fence.

I personally have done exactly this, both with the fence parallel to the blade and with it splayed out a bit. My observations simply do not jive with your claim.
No pressure is needed on the workpiece behind the blade to keep it against the fence. Think about it -- if the workpiece is straight and the fence is straight, and the workpiece is against the fence in front of the blade, how can there be a gap between the workpiece and fence behind the blade? Try this -- move the fence away from the blade, or lower the blade below the table, and set a straight board against the fence. Push the board against the fence only in front of where the blade would be. Is the board touching the fence at the back? Jim
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On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 09:13:44 -0500, "George"

so your wood only touches the fence at the front of the saw? on my saw that point is a good 8 or 10 inches away from the blade.
what you are describing is hardly different from freehanding the cut or working with a starting pin.

um... no. the piece is restrained (at least until the board is in 2 pieces) by it's own structural integrity.
by the way, you don't help your cause by resorting to invective. it just makes you look like a poopiehead.... ; ^ )

I do. I keep the wood against the fence it's entire length.

that exception occured to me also....

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Bridger wrote: complete snippage...
Hey Bridge, one of the definitions of insanity is, "performing the same task over and over again but expecting different results".
Now I know for certain I'm just a wee bit insane but I'm not insane enough to try and sway Bay Area George. Sides, it's too cold outside to break out the sidewalk chalk and then there's the snow covering that would need removing.
UA100, on to fight another day...
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wrote:

I guess he slipped in under the radar.
that generic-first-name-only bit musta been what fooled me....
    Bridger
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George wrote:

How many decades ago was this?
UA100
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brought forth from the murky depths:

It can be (somewhat) adjusted out with the holddown bolt. ;)

Hey, who said that?

One could also simply cut a piece of wood, grab their dial calipers,and check variation front to back. That's what I did to originally set up Dina's old cast arn fence to within a couple thou. Paper shims aren't fancy but they do the job.

Now that I think about it, the spring-loaded indicator should pretty much take care of that. Yes, the TSA would be quite a bit nicer, but not $150 nicer to me. (Them's -crowbar- figgers, son!)

So what if it isn't? You're making -relative- measurements, not looking for interference fits in tenths here. (Within an RCH is fine with me. You?) You could do just as well with a bar and a set of feeler gauges IF you know what to look for and how to set it up.
---------------------------------------------------------------- * Blessed are those who can * Humorous T-shirts Online * laugh at themselves, for they * Comprehensive Website Dev. * shall never cease to be amused * http://www.diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------------
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Ed won't get him, he is too busy workin 18 hour days trying to keep up with the demand to bother readin a news group. I have the Jr and ordered the upgrade to Deluxe a while back but am still waiting, got an email from him that he is way behind and trying to catch up.
I have the Jr and use it where I can and it saves time for me. there is no guess work about it being square and accurate as I would have with a home made jig. I have medium priced tools that can be made to work better than "out of the box" by using a setup tool.
money well spent.
BRuce
charlie b wrote:

--
---

BRuce

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charlie b wrote:

Charlie,
You don't get much of an indicator for $18 retail.
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Mark

N.E. Ohio
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Well I would have to agree with Larry and Mark. I set mine up with a good sliding t square and a piece of perfectly flat acrylic 4" x 10" with a 5/8" hole dead on center. Acrylic was free, I have a good square already along with the bit to drill the hole. Although it could be done with the blade on I'm sure. I set the fence the same way, ran a board, and measured with three different steel rules, all accurate with each other. Results were dead on accurate. I then borrowed my neighbors Junior, and guess what? The end result was within .003. I don't think that's too bad. As a matter of fact, it's livable. It netted a complete kitchen, bedroom suite, dressing room furniture...the list goes on. Just my nickel's worth, take it as it is. BTW, my shop is an all Ridgid shop, with an occasional Craftsman, or Crapsman, tool thrown in for good measure! ;-)
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They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I checked the web site. Good gods man, $140 for that thing? Hell, I have combinations of power tools that don't add up to that much.
I guess that makes me a bottom feeder.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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I'm lucky, I work in a machine shop and made my own. An indicator and dovetailed slide mounted to a base. It will ride in any sized slot, and it's square vertically to .001. Maybe I'll post a couple pics in the binaries.                         Mark
Matt Zach wrote:

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Imported dial indicators and so cheap nowadays it's hard to argue not to have one for the $10-15 or so they cost, but really, to set up a tablesaw you need nothing more than a good combination square. I use a DI myself but got equally good results when I only used the combo square in he past. Some people get good results just using a piece of wood clamped to the miter gauge. See any good tablesaw book for details, I like Kelly Mehlers book.
Now, if you really need to know to "how many thousandths" your saw is adjusted, you will need the indicator and some type of fixture to hold it, either shop made or something like the TS Aligner by Ed Bennet. But if you just want to set up your saw to cut wood, you don't really need to know the numbers.
FWIW, I don't own one myself, but the TS Aligner Jr is probably one of the better buys if you want to purchase something.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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wrote:

I use a Starrett Dial Indicator on a Magnetic Base to set up the TableSaur, as well as all the other crap that thinks that it needs to be set up proper-like.
It has it's own way of describing the world, which I think is in thousands, but I freely translate them into the tradtional RCH or my current standard, "A Gnat's Ass", "A Little Less Than A Gnat's Ass", or, "A Little More Than A Gnat's Ass".
The "AGA" standard has served me well and acknowledges the fact that wood doesn't think in thousands of an inch but in "Gnat's Asses".
I've been working on an aftermarket overlay for the Starrett that will provide the more useful readout in "GA's" but that is still in the developmentally challenged state.
I look forward to completing this work in the Spring, as the shop is far too cold for this sort of thing right now and the dial indicator is reading in "FGA's" (Frozen Gnats Asses) which are something smaller than "GA's", owing to the shrinkage of the associated members, which I am sure that you are acquainted with, as it is a common problem.
I've been working on an Excel based graphing solution that will give a readout of "AGA" v. "FGA", with a time/temperature curve giving the probable solution - but this work is going slowly.
Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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I use the Harbor Freight dial indicator (#623-0VGA) and it works fine. I also have the HF magnetic base (#5645-0VGA) which I mount the indicator on to check the arbor, flange, and blade runout. I mount the dial indicator to a big 'L' bracket and clamp it to my miter guage to check the miter slot-to-blade, miter slot-to-fence alignment. Both the indicator and base work great, and they're currently on sale at the local HF for $6.99 each. I think the regular price is about $15 or so for each item.
Tom
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