Which clear finish has the best adhesion properties

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Which clear coat finish has the best adhesion properties. I'm trying to coat something with a clear coat to protect it. I've tried spray on polyurethane, however, after a couple of days it simply peels off with a fingernail. Unfortunately I can't sand the surface I'm covering. However, I'm wondering if there might be a clear coat finish that might have better sticking/adhesion that poly.
Thanks, Harry
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 20:44:22 -0500, "Harry Muscle"

What are you covering?
Barry
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in message wrote:

Wood Print Veneer. I have a piece of furniture made of particle board covered in that wood print veneer that I want to protect with some sort of clear coat, but poly just peeled right off with my fingernail.
Thanks, Harry
P.S. If anyone knows what the official name is for that fake wood print veneer, please let me know. It's the kind of veneer you'd find on Walmart furniture for example.
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My bet is the material is a plastic foil that was heat shrunk to fit. So what sticks to plastic? JG
Harry Muscle wrote:

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On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 21:54:53 -0500, "Harry Muscle"

Plastic?
Poly or varnish won't stick to it. Lacquer will probably craze it.
Barry
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it isn't wood... wood finishes aren't going to perform well on it. you might consider something like heavy clear shelf paper or vinyl wrapped around the edges and tacked on the bottom.     Bridger
On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 21:54:53 -0500, "Harry Muscle"

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In that case I would suggest clear contac paper.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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O

yes that's the key. shellac or a clear acrylic may do it. is it really clean?
--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
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clean?
Couple of questions. If the shellac will hold (I'm gonna try tonight), could I apply something a little more protective over the shellac. My main worry is water damage, and I've read that shellac doesn't stand up to water too good. Do I have to use dewaxed shellac in order to apply something over it ... or does that only apply when you're covering it with poly?
Also, would clear acrylic be water, oil, mineral based?
Thanks, Harry
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dewaxed is more water resistant. it will not desolve with water just look bad. I am thinking the rattle cans of clear spray would do it. but I think something in sheet form will make you happier.
--
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 20:44:22 -0500, "Harry Muscle"

What are you coating? Why can't you sand it? And, why does it need protection?
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wrote:

However,
better
Wood Print Veneer. I have a piece of furniture made of particle board covered in that wood print veneer that I want to protect with some sort of clear coat, but poly just peeled right off with my fingernail. I can't sand it cause I'll ruin the existing veneer, and I need to protect it because I will have a fish tank sitting on it.
Thanks, Harry
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On Mon, 12 Jan 2004 06:56:36 -0500, "Harry Muscle"

That surface is pretty much waterproof as it is. You only have to be concerned with the edges, where water spills can get under the veneer and degrade the particle board.
Try using a small brush to put poly along all of the edges and seams, you'll be good to go.
Barry
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in message

I
Actually it's not waterproof, maybe we're thinking of a slightly different veneer. I tried leaving a puddle of water on a test piece (away from the edges, in the middle of the piece), and after 1 hour the water had already caused the wood fibers under the veneer to expand and make the surface bubbly.
I don't know if anyone has ever bought furniture from Walmart or the like, but it's the kind of veneer you'd find on their furniture.
Thanks, Harry
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Harry, I've been following this 'thread' for a bit and it's really starting to get ridiculous. You are spending so much effort on something that is de facto 'disposable'. {unfortunately, depending on the extensiveness of the fish collection. . . it probably includes them, too - if the life span of my wife's Beta's is any indication}.
'Particleboard' is basically sawdust mixed with water-soluble glue. Mix it with water and it turns back into it's constituent parts. Putting a piece of 'colored paper' on top isn't going to stop that process. Putting a waterproof film on top of the paper simply means that the top layer of paper fibers will separate . . . first.
Our tank {although rather small, remember that fresh water weighs 62 pounds per cubic foot, or 8 pounds per gallon}is sitting on an antique 'lacquered' tray. The tray is sitting on an antique inlaid table. No problems and everything 'fits' the decor. The 'antiques' ? - 'collected' or given over the years . . . the 'eye of the beholder' sort of thing.
What we have for a 'coffee table' I got at 'K-Mart' a year or so ago. NOT exactly an 'heirloom' item . . . Teak - made in the Philippines, so that is actually Luan - in the 'Mission' style. Cost? - about $30. Less then getting the wood and building it myself . . . and it is SOLID wood. And I would guess about what the particle board & paper Wal-Mart / Chinese table cost you.
FWIW - chalk this entire situation up to a 'lesson learned'. Take all the advise you have received, and go to some Salvation Army or 'church outlet' shop and get yourself something a little more substantial. It may be perfect just the way it is. However, if you pick carefully, if you do have to 'refinish' it . . . there will be some 'meat' to work with.
Having particleboard furniture and water together is like having bare batteries in your bilge . . it's simply matter of 'When' your going to get burned !!
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

because
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OK, so you want to protect the termite puke from the fish-splash.
How about a sheet of 1/8" plexiglass cut to size at the local hardware store/lumberyard? It will just flex under the weight (if necessary) and it is absolutely waterproof.
-Steve
wrote:

to
a
sand
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On Mon, 12 Jan 2004 10:45:44 -0500, "Stephen M"

Great idea.
I vote for Steve's method.
Barry
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shellac. if it won't stick you are outta luck now that it's got poly that's peeling, the shellac hasn't got a chance either. shoudda done the shellac first.
dave
Harry Muscle wrote:

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Fortunately I only put poly on a test piece section.
Harry
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Quick question. Could I apply something over the shellac (if the shellac holds) in order to make it more water reistant. Btw, how not water resistant is shellac? How long does a little puddle of water have to sit on a shellacked piece before it starts to penetrate or deteriorate the shellac?
Thanks, Harry
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