Which chisel?

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On 01/05/2016 3:57 PM, notbob wrote:

was taught by a German and they always cut the pins first. I did that for a red oak box and had a helluva job cutting the tails in that coarse-grained hard wood. I should have cut the tails first, English style. Graham
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I've heard so many opinions, it's like ....well, ya' know..... ;)

I've seen that technique on U2B. Some guy w/ a jillion dollar backsaw sez cut pins first, then use finished pins and a pencil to lay out slots (mortises?).

I would, eventually, like to make a cabinet spkr enclosure for a tube amplifier head. I once had a Mesa Boogie ina dove-tailed cabinet made of koa wood. Gorgeous. :)
nb
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Tails.

have it sound like crap. Particle board makes a better enclosure, anyway.
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Thnx. My WW vocabulary is still evolving.

One of the reasons I sold the MB. Not only was that koa wood not great, sonically, it was damn heavy, too. It was a special 100W 1x12 combo amp and between the super large magnet on the spkr and the heavy koa wood, the lil' sucker weighed in at over 80lbs. I'm gettin too old fer that kinda nonsense.
I now play thru a small tube practice amp (5W Bugera) that is made of PB. Sucker is pretty solid, but I've yet to spill a beer on it and we all know a R&R amp ain't right until it's had beer spilled on it. ;)
nb
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Particle board is pretty heavy but if you want it heavier, fill the enclosure with sand (seriously).

I don't do beer anymore but I doubt coke[*] would do it much good either (unless you sweep it up quickly ;-).
[*] I'm so far past beer, it's caffeine free diet, for me.
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4ax.com:

In a rock-and-roll context, that probably didn't come out quite the way you intended it.
(yeah, I know, you meant Atlanta's favorite beverage).
John
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On Mon, 2 May 2016 18:52:11 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

It's probably more common in a rock-and-roll context than others. It was intended as double entendre (I didn't capitalize it intentionally). ;-)

Which one? ;-)
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On 01/05/2016 5:49 PM, notbob wrote:

more than your chisels:-) Graham
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I've read baltic birch is a good tonewood and is often used for guitar amp enclosures.
BTW, it's officially a "Rock n' Roll amp", now. I spilled beer on it, last night. No real harm done, but I'm gonna make any future cabs "beer proof". ;)
nb
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Is this an amp with speakers, or just a head? If it's just a head, it doesn't much matter what you make it from, as long as it looks good.
If it has speakers, yeah, you probably want to choose materials that won't affect the sound, or at least not in ways you don't want.
John
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I plan ona spkr only cabinet. Probably jes one spkr, but the cab will be set up to accommodate different spkrs, easily changed out. Why buy a combo when heads are cheaper? Then change the spkr in the cabinet to one that fits the style of playing. That's my plan. ;)
nb
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notbob wrote:

You're probably not going to like that idea after you change out a speaker the first time. Go for a good speaker right off the bat and rely on your fingers, your guitar settings and your amp EQ/gain, etc. to get the sound you want for a particular style.
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How old? And how rusty?
In many cases, rather than spending effort polishing up an old saw, just using it to cut wood will remove the surface rust and leave a nice patina.
What you really want to worry about is if it's sharp. If it's fairly modern, it's probably made from an induction- hardened steel that will resist sharpening, but if it's older it would be worth grabbing a saw file and sharpening it. Ideally you'd have a saw vise to hold it, but you can clamp it between a couple of boards. There's a knack to saw sharpening, but it's not that hard to get it.
John
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An interesting opinion (I assume you meant "A2" rather than "A1", since A1 doesn't seem to exist). I have always understood that high chromium steels are basically impossibly to sharpen on normal stones, and can only be ground.
I also note that Ron Hock, who has some reputation in the field of tool blades, favors A2 and O1 over other steels. http://www.hocktools.com/tech-info/o1-vs-a2.html
According to the link you cited, FWW rated the LN chisels "best western style", which doesn't exactly sound like "meh". I'd guess LN selected the steel they use to have a good tradeoff between durability and ease of sharpening (I looked for my copy of that issue of FWW to see if there was more detail, but as usual it seems the issue I want is missing from the stack).
I do have a set of the LN chisels. I save them for fine work, so I can't really speak to their durability. I have a set of old Marples for day-to-day use.
Incidenly, notbob should be happy to know FWW rated the Narex brand "best value".
John
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On Monday, May 2, 2016 at 9:07:43 AM UTC-5, John McCoy wrote:

I DID mean A2, thanks for the catch. But you should probably tell these gu ys to knock it off:
http://www.steelss.com/Tool-steel/a1.html

Absolutely no doubt. Some of the best lathe turning tools (setting aside t he powdered Crucible metals) have been shop made from O1.

Middle of the pack to me, qualifies as "meh". Remember, I made it clear I love my steels. I can take a lesser steel for a lesser price, but a higher priced chisel with a premium steel needs to have that steel pushed to its limits.
From the FWW article, verbatim:
"Its mid-range length is great for controlled detail work, yet its blade is long enough for moderate-range paring. The A2 blade's durability found a s pot in the middle of the pack, but in spite of this, the ergonomics prevail ed. $50."

Certainly your experience may be different, but my personal experience alon g with their "middle of the pack" comment after testing reflect on another. Like you I wasn't interested enough to find the magazine with the exact ar ticle, so their summary made the point in just a few sentences.
Always (and this is where the LNs excel) is the consideration of how comfor table a chisel is to use. I have had some nice chisels over the years that had nice steel, but were absolutely miserable to use for anything but a bu tt chisel. Ergos all wrong, contours of the handles wrong, unbalanced in t he hand, etc., bad enough that they made the nice steel a waste of time. I never could figure out how to rehandle them, so they became beaters.

I hope if he tries them he lets us know. They seem to get a lot of good re views, but always with the caveat "especially for the price" or "can't beat these for the price" etc. The good news is you can buy them one or two at a time to try them out.
Robert
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Well, that got me curious. Those guys might be refering to 303 stainless, since their spec has a lot of nickel and 303 stainless is also known as "A1" in someone's numbering system.
The A2, etc, numbering system comes from the AISI by way of the SAE. Apparently the AISI started a list sometime in the late 1940s (it's not in my 1948 Machinery's Handbook), assigning the numbers in sequence, but never actually writing a spec for them. When the SAE took over, I'm guessing they either thought A1 was obsolete, or couldn't figure out what it was intended to be, so they started at A2.
John
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On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 9:49:10 AM UTC-5, John McCoy wrote:

At this point, who knows? There are so many steels out there being used fo r everything one can imagine it is silly. I used to read a lot about it, b ut finally just lost interest.
BLADEFORUMS is a place where makers and enthusiasts argue steel, manufactur ers, properties, designations, names and country of origins all day long, e very day.
Biting issues such as "does 440c perform as well as 9crMov?"
And is "S110v less brittle if cryo-quenched for an extended period"
Along with "154cm v. S30V, you decide after forging yourself which has bett er end results". Of course that is followed by the neanderthals that scream that since 1095 was good enough for their grandfathers, it is good enough for them. Answered by the folks that insert their own favorite steel into the discussion and question why we wouldn't use a better product if it was readily available.
They argue on and on about steel designations, its properties, the accuracy of the mills that make them, the "equivalent" steels made in other countri es to match our standards and their respective differences, and then compar e performance of each. It is common for a ABS Bladesmith to find a steel h e likes, then try his best to master it for a cutting tool, and when master ed become his trademark steel.
A few years ago they were competing to find out the weirdest things about c ommon steels, all in fun. That was a treasure trove as to be in the discus sion you had to cite your source, and not just Google. I found out that S3 0V (a great knife steel!) is actually a steel developed in Sweden for the s having razor industry. Learned that D2 was developed in the late 40s for h eavy die stamping forms such as the auto industry that was using it for doo r, trunk and hood stamps. Its abrasion and corrosion resistance led to som eone experimenting with it as a cutting steel. One guy claimed (and backed it up to the satisfaction of the group) that certain American shock absorbe r makers were using a low RC O1 as the rods in their product. They got a l etter from one of he manufacturers that confirmed it! And while they had be en making woodturning tools from the round O1 stock in shock absorbers for years, the guys that make woodturning tools had no idea it was likely O1.
Too many steels now, too many designations, and too many renames and relist ings. I don't really see how anyone could keep up with it all accurately.
Robert
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On Wed, 4 May 2016 08:26:15 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"
snip of a wonderful tale

That is an engineers dream, to know your stuff inside and out better than anyone else.
But is also the reason for endless usenet "discussions" on a variety subjects.
It is human.
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Go to your neighborhood flea market this weekend.
What's for dinner?
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On 04/28/2016 6:05 PM, notbob wrote: ...

If you're not in a hurry, watch eBay for estate clearance stuff and the like...not infrequently there is really good quality stuff for minimal prices but you've got to be able to discern what is and isn't and have the patience to wait for it...
Or, as another posted, yard sales and the like are essentially the same process on foot with advantages (get to see it first) and disadvantages (do have to go do the legwork to get there while there's still something to be seen).
--


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