when you know you should have hired a pro and free oak lumber and you cut and you haul

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My uncle was cutting down a tree near a large metal building not long ago. He had the tree almost ready to fall, and a big gust of wind came up and did it for him... Right on to the building. Oops.
(I was not there, but did see the downed building.)
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

The one time I cut down a tree and it was important that it fall in a particular direction, I tied a rope around it a ways up the trunk, and used a pickup truck to keep tension on it in the direction I wanted the tree to fall (having made sure the rope was long enough that the tree didn't fall on the truck, fortunately).
John
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On Sat, 22 Aug 2015 13:52:12 +0000 (UTC)

i saw a video where they did this sort of the rope was not taught though they waited until tree was loose i thought that the bumper was going to come off or some other mishap
it was more like a giant 25 foot stump they cut it and store it for 10-15 years
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Yeah, that occurred to me when I did it. So I tied the rope to the trailer hitch. I figured if the hitch is good to pull an umpteen thousand pound trailer, it's good to keep a rope (with a few hundred pound breaking point) taut for a while.
Speaking of which, today's safety reminder - if you have a taut rope, keep any spectators well back from the scene. If it breaks, it's going to act like a whip and mow down anyone within range.
John
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Whoever cut that, obviously knows nothing at all about felling a tree.
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On 8/22/2015 8:37 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

LOL. He said that he had to take the tree down. I bet it was for fear that if he didn't it wold one day fall on the house.
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On Sat, 22 Aug 2015 13:37:39 +0000 (UTC)

it is possible they know a lot but what they know is all wrong on their way to becoming pro maybe
there are some notes in the scribners book (in other thread) about felling trees
don't fell them in the direction they lean or opposite of lean instead as perpendicular as is possible
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On 08/22/2015 10:03 AM, Electric Comet wrote: ...

...
And if that's the direction of a (valuable) obstacle one does what, exactly???
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Hire a boom truck and take it down in pieces.
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On 08/22/2015 1:01 PM, Markem wrote:

One alternative, certainly, the point was general advice must be tempered by facts of the case...
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wrote:

Tree sefvice took down a HUGE maple in the neighbour's back yard ratlier this year. They did it all with simple rope slings, most of it coming down in chunks 4 feet long or less. The only power tools they used were a chain saw and a big chipper out on the street. The cutter went up the tree, cut off a few branches, tied on with his sling, and cut off all the branched piece by piece, dropping them with a rope sling, then went up the tree with spurs and belt,. and cut chunks off above the belt- pushing them off as he went. Surprising how fast that tree came down!!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in news:taihtap0dk3f1n1pg202rraakahvfoc7dr@ 4ax.com:

Always fun to watch experts at work. They certainly get things done efficiently. :-)
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in wrote in news:taihtap0dk3f1n1pg202rraakahvfoc7dr@

Of course, then there's the experts who don't. I recall seeing video on CNN several years ago of a tree service using a crane to lift a large tree out of a backyard, over the house. Since it wouldn't be news if it had worked as planned, you know what happened next: the tree got dropped on the house, causing all manner of damage.
There was some reason why it couldn't be taken down piece- wise, but I don't recall what it was.
Around here the power company has been replacing poles. The way they do it is to lift the new pole vertically with a very tall crane, and thread it down thru the wires. Then they fasten the wires to the new pole, detach from the old, and pull the old one out vertically the same way. It looks like there's any manner of ways that could go wrong, but they don't seem to have caused any blackouts yet...
John
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On 8/22/2015 4:30 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Could be it was going to be transplanted. There is a machine that cuts a huge root ball and takes the entire tree out.
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On Sat, 22 Aug 2015 15:16:42 -0400 snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

i watched a blackwood acacia go down in a similar way recently with the exception that were cutting longer sections for the local portable lumber mill i think they were 6 feet or so
the trimmer used ropes for each piece and when he cut those pieces loose that tree swung a lot
looked too exciting for me but he seemed to know the tree wasn't going anywhere
only the smallest of branches went into the chipper i got some nice pieces that are aging
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On Saturday, August 22, 2015 at 2:16:50 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Watching the pros do it is pretty neat. The swing around and make it look e asy with a chainsaw on their belts. We have a friend who does it for us whe n we need it. I can fell a lot of trees in the right direction with the pro per notch cut, but the larger trees are really the province of the pros.
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On Sat, 22 Aug 2015 11:47:31 -0500

can read about it in that scribners book
if you have limits on where you can fell it then you just may end up having to lose some of the wood due to splitting because your only choice is to fell it in the direction it leans (or opposite of lean)
but if you are really limited then you cut it down piece by piece just like any urban tree trimmer would do
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That's not meaningfully different from knowing nothing at all. I repeat, whoever cut that obviously knows nothing at all about felling a tree. Look at the picture again: there's one cut.
Just one.
One horizontal cut about 90% of the way through the trunk, before the tree snapped off and fell in the direction it would obviously fall.
You're *supposed* to notch it on the side you want it to fall toward: *two* cuts, not one, like this: <
Then make a horizontal cut from the other side, above the notch, and the tree falls toward the notch.
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On Sun, 23 Aug 2015 00:01:25 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Unless it is grossly overbalanced the other way, in which case it just "kicks" and still falls toward the lean. anyway.
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