When does the disease end?

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Started serious wood working 2 years ago this time of year, and since then I've aquired quite a nice set of tools. The problem is, every time I buy a new big shiny machine, I wonder how I ever lived without it. When does this feeling end, when the money runs out? ;-)
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Just about 2 days after you're dead and buried. Welcome to the fold :)
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It ends when you die, and your wife/kids pay someone to haul away all those nasty old machines.
Makes one really want to be sure they have a will written up, and at least be sure the tools go to someone who will appreciate them
John
On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 20:36:28 -0500, "Chris Hornberger"

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Me, Me, Me. I will appreciate them. How are you feeling these days? When can I come down and appreciate them in person?
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No, not even when the money runs out.
I have this theory that whne you "start" woodworking, you think that the more tools that you have, the more successful that you will be. After about 15+ years, I am still somewhere in this stage - enjoying a shiny new tool every so often.
But I think that if you can progress far enough, you get beyond the "Norm" stage (to which I am still aspiring) and into a more "artistic" stage where you can do exceptional work with hand tools (see Frank Klausz video on Dovetailed drawers - FWW website).
Many of us are in in the "unwashed mass" category - happily buying stuff that makes us marginally better - and probably doomed by same to remain (broadly) where we are.
Still, I like my power tools and have to remind myself of what it was like "back then" when I couldn't miter a decent corner.
Lou
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Larry Bud wrote:

I look at it like an insurance policy. When I die my wife will be able to support herself for the rest of her years by selling off my tools.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Nova wrote:

next to nothing because 1. She has no need for them and wants to empty the house and 2. She doesn't have a clue what they are really worth.
Put it in writing what the tools are really worth, keep it updated and keep it with your will so she will find it after you are gone assuming you go first.
Rick
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RKG wrote:

My wife bought most of them..
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 23:12:21 -0500, RKG

I'm a bit more optimistic than that. There have been more than a few times when I've seen old widows protecting their departed husband's tools like a shrine. It's kind of touching really- I can't imagine that an 80-yr old woman is out using a unisaw, they just like to keep them around.

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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On 19 Nov 2004 17:21:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote:

When you keep making the same thing for a while. Most of the need for new tools is because you're doing new things.
--
Smert' spamionam

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(Larry Bud)

Good point. I've been trying to learn something new each time I pick a project. But then that "something new" kinda becomes tedious. for instance, I just bought a jointer. Yeah, I've lived without one for 2 years, and I can make pretty darn good glued up panels just by straigtening the board on the table saw, but that sure becomes a hassle.
Raised panels: I've learned how to do them on the table saw, but now I just want to MAKE one, without having to sand the crap out of it when I'm done, so the raised panel bit is on order.... Please, someone just finish me off now!
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On 21 Nov 2004 06:48:59 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote:

So use a panel raising plane 8-)

Hmmm. Nice if you want fancy shaped mouldings without hand planing them, but for flat raised panels I'd rather use the table saw.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Hmmmm.. let's see what that costs:
7518 3HP PC router $300 Router Lift(Jessum) $300 Fancy bits set $150 fancy router table $150 ______ $900
The joy of making (1) raised panel door can never be priced.
Larry Bud wrote:

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And that assumes you got the right profile door set to begin with...
Patriarch, who believes that router bits are kinds like those potato chips...
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Pat Barber wrote:

Mailing the template half away across the NewNitedStates a couple of times...
Priceless!
UA100
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Well, already made a router table, don't need the lift, and already had a router.
So really, it just cost me $69.99 for the bit.
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On 19 Nov 2004 17:21:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote:

I don't think it does, unless you burn out or get more interested in something else that becomes your priority..
I see myself getting more patient and a little more skilled lately... this in turn requires more and better tools, so that you can USE these factors, reinforced by the fact that when you're starting out, most of the things that you build are FOR the hobby/disease... bench, router table, jigs, shelves, cabinets, drawers, etc.. That means that you have to SEE your results all the time and think about how much better/easier/faster/cooler it would have been if you just had this one tool when you did it..
Besides, if you didn't keep buying tools, all of those Chi-Wan-ese kids would be going blind in factories for nothing... it's your duty to kids everywhere to keep buying bigger and better tools..
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Ironically, it ends when some other guy uses his tools to make a nice wooden box and you're in it.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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LOL!
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Larry Bud wrote:

Cha! If only it were *that* easy. You hear stories of people living on the streets with addictions but somehow *they* manage to find the money and the time for their Jones. Believe me, you *will* find the money.
UA100, blood seller/confirmed addict since 1967(ish)...
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