Wheels on bench

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If wheels are mounted to a work bench legs, so lifting the other end results in the workbench riding on the wheels, approximately how much of an angle would the bench need to be tipped to?
Here's the scenario: My bench serves as an infeed table as well as a bench. Sometimes I need to move it a foot or so closer to the saw for support. I was wondering if putting wheels on one set of legs would make it easy to lift the other end to pull the bench closer to the saw. I'm not looking for something expensive, big, or fancy, just enough to make it easier to move the bench that couple of inches.
I guess a hinged drop down support would also meet this need, but it would seem to get in the way of storage on the side of the bench.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Depends on the length of the bench. If you have wheels on two legs, you only need to lift the other two legs clear of the ground, say 1mm, in order to move it. The angle is determined by the height you lift and the distance between the vertical centre-line of the wheels and your lifting point.
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I was thinking of using these casters on a planer (DW733) cabinet I'm planning. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page0842&site=ROCKLER
On 05/10/2012 02:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

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On 5/10/2012 3:57 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I assume that $16 is for the four of them as that is what I paid a little less for those on my bench.
While I did not get expensive casters, I made sure I got those with the highest load rating for the price. Many years ago I put hard rubber castors I believe the originals were rated 150lb+, Those lasted until about 9 months age, I know the ones I replaced them with were rated at 175lb.
What ever you get do not get real cheap ones. With my bench I have two shelves under the working top. While I try to control what goes in and on the bench, a lot of weight can collect on those shelves.
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"John Shear" wrote:

----------------------------------- Take a look at the mobile base used on the Delta contractor's saw.
Will give you some good ideas.
Lew
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"John Shear" wrote in message
I was thinking of using these casters on a planer (DW733) cabinet I'm planning. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page0842&site=ROCKLER ****************************************************** I like to go the other way, that is to put the machine on wheels, then a bolt with a handle on top is screwed down to lift the wheel off the ground. Good security, and it makes the machine level no matter how uneven the floor.
-- Jim in NC
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I use a tripod setup to level my tools.
Basically all my cabinets are on 4 wheels, but I use three points. The cabinet has limiters to prevent the cabinet from tipping (like the trikes used to before being outlawed). One of my limiters is an adjustable lock. Once it's in place I twist the knob let it slide to the "AXLE" then lock it. No tip, never rocks because a wheel is not down. I got tired of putting wedges under wheels to steady cabinets. I have my sanding station, mortising station, router table and small setup table configured this way. I plan to do more sometime. It helps on an wavy concrete floor.
On 5/12/2012 9:41 PM, Morgans wrote:

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On 5/10/2012 3:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

My work bench is about 30 X 52 and on four caster wheels. It was built so that it is the same height as the table saw. The bench can be moved any where in the shop so it can be used with the table saw, drill press, router table or any where else that it is needed.
I built this bench over 15 years ago and found it completely fulfills the designed function. I can use it as an out feed table or on the feed side of the saw to hold the pieces that I am working on. I usually place the bench at a right angle to the saw on the feed side so I can drop the cut pieces in one area and pick up the uncut pieces without a lot of movement. (I do a lot of picture framing and stretchers.)
The first thing that someone will say is it is not stationary. To that I respond, how many times have you pushed so hard on a piece of wood the you are ripping on the saw that you could possibly move an out feed table on wheels.
Additionally so what if it moves a little. the purpose of the out feed table is to support the piece as it comes off of the saw. Even if it moves a couple of inches it is still doing its purpose. PS In the 15 years, I don't remember it moving.
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Keith that depends on what you use your bench for. I use mine to hand plane, scrape... having wheels would make it useless. So as long as it's an assembly table or infeed/outfeed no problem, when it becomes a hand tool bench it is a problem.
On 5/10/2012 9:07 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

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On 5/10/2012 10:20 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

I picked up on "using it as an infeed table" in your original post, but I understand if you are using it for a purpose where there is actual force applied to the bench.
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

Mine is exactly the same except two of the casters are locking casters.
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That sounds like what I've been imagining. I'm sure the exact angle would be a function of wheel size, center distance from leg etc. I'd love to have something that wouldn't stick out very far (an inch or two) and make it easier to move the bench.
Would you mind looking for a picture or giving a more detailed description?
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote

Just take a look at many benches used in gyms. I have built a lot of them. You just take the caster and line it up with the floor, so it just clears the floor. That determines your angle. Build an angled mount and fasten it to the legs. When you need to move the bench, just lift the other end and roll it it around. Many modern benches in the gym are very heavy and hard to move around. Which is shy they have the rolling casters on them. It can be easily adapted to use on the big benches as well.
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Thanks. The picture gives me a starting point for something similar. Looks like the key is that the center of the wheel is mounted outside of the leg, so tipping the saw allows the leg to fully lift.
I'll have to pick up a couple of wheels and experiment.
Puckdropper
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I picked up a couple of lawnmower wheels and mounted them to the bench. I simply attached the wheels to the leg with a couple of screws through a 2x4. The bench will tilt back on the legs and move easily now, but it doesn't start to move freely until the angle is just at the point where it's uncomfortable to lift.
I think if I knocked the corner of the legs off the bench would move freely at a lower angle. Good thing I haven't put doors on and loaded it up yet.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper,
take a look at these: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page0842&filterC501
BTW did you get your handle by being a hockey ref? Still do it?
On 5/10/2012 3:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

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tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in

An interesting idea, but they're really built for another purpose. I just need to move my bench a few inches at a time, not across the workshop.
I got my handle from when my dad played hockey. I was too young to play in the league at the time, but they would let me drop the puck after a goal was scored. I've never reffed (except for the reffing that all players do *g*).
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

---------------------------------- Mount a couple of 4" dia wheels across the short dimension of the bench.
If you don't have one, buy a 2 wheeled dolly.
Insert tongue of dolly under other end short dimension of bench, rock back to lift and move bench.
Reverse to drop bench in place.
Get a beer, enjoy your efforts.
Lew
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On 5/10/2012 12:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Several years ago Norm did a work table like that, that I built.
The drop board with wheels works very well.
http://www.newyankee.com/index.php?idS#ecwid:category 55062&mode=product&producty16621
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

My workbench is on casters and is very (very) heavy in part due to the weight of heavy items stored in the enclosed based. I seriously doubt I could pick up the end of the bench without the aid of a lever or a jack. The casters protrude below the bench's base. I simply tap some wedges under the edges of the bench to keep it in place. On those relatively rare occasions that I need to move the bench all I need to do is give a quick tap to the wedges to loosen them and I'm good to do.
John
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