Whatcha all think of this Jointer?

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I'm looking at this Grizzly jointer, has anybody seen, used, or bought one?
http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-46-Jointer-with-Mobile-Base-Polar-Bear-Series/G0452P
I don't know what the difference is in the "Polar Bear Series", they claim nothing.
-Jim
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ago. I have been very happy with it and it's performance.
Mine had some kind of handle on the top of the fence, near where the switch is on the model you linked to. I don't know what the handle was for, and removed it because it was in the way (at least for me). I don't know if the power switch would be in the way when jointing tall stock.
When I moved about 8 years ago, the jointer had a fender bender with a Dodge truck. The jointer won. :-)
__________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
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http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-46-Jointer-with-Mobile-Base-Polar-Bear-Series/G0452P
Only thing that looks good about that, is the stop switch
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I've had an 8 inch non-polar bear griz jointer for about six years now. Like it a lot.
The only flaw I can see in that one is that it's too short.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com, wrote the following at or about 11/29/2010 3:15 PM:

When they tell you that, tell them that you'll take the Grizzly at the same price. After all, "there's no difference!" <g>
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wrote:

Yeah, I know what you mean. After more examination they have several 6" models, all around the same price. None of the specs seem all that much different. I'll have to look closer to see what is best. This is really the top of my budget, so it is one of these or something used.
My brother in law has several Grizzly machines and swears by them. What is it about them that the "group" doesn't like?
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I have owned and bought a lot of grizzly stuff over the years. I often help other people go to the showroom up the highway and make their purchases. Their quality used to be low on their low end machines. It is a lot better now. And the prices have always been good. A lot of businesses buy Grizzly. Because of price and they make some bigger machines too. It is always nice when you have the choice of several tools when you buy something. And in some areas, they have a very wide selection.
In my own experience, years ago, I had to both assemble and tweak several machines. Especially a table saw. But for the price, it was worth it. And some of the specs are good for metal as well. I used to do a lot of drill press work for both wood and metal. Grizzly, years ago, had drill presses that would allow me to do the metal work for about half of what anybody else was offering at that time.
There is more competition now. But it is hard to fault their extensive selection. Or their bang for the buck appeal. I really think that a lot of the bias against them originated from a time when everybody bought their tools locally. Buying tools on the internet is much more common these days.
I have seen their tools in over 30 different commercial shops. and a few home shops as well. A lot of those guys ended up buying a little bigger machine than they originally thought they would because Grizzly had attractive pricing and the selection to match.
No, I don't own any of grizzly or work for them. They are privately owned.
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jtpr wrote: ...

I always look first at two things -- weight (more is better) and motor spec's (same thing). Unfortunately w/ the latter, one is at mercy of whatever they're putting on them; they're all Chinese any more and that, in my mind, is the most crapshoot part of the whole deal w/ Griz of what one's going to actually get.

In general, afaik the Griz has always gotten good marks for service and support and generally good value. Word lately seems to be that perhaps the Shop Fox folk are up there w/ 'em as well.
I've never owned one; have seen a few but none are recent so don't take too seriously (other than the first observation I believe is real)...
--
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Yeah, I know what you mean. But this "Chinese" thing seems to be prevalent in all machinery. One has to wonder though, is this necessarily a bad thing or is it becoming the Japanese car of the 1980's? At that time they were crap, then they became far superior to anything we make. I mean, is there anything that is completely made in this country that is even close to affordable and if there is, does that necessarily represent quality?
I guess it is all academic as there is no way I can justify, on my budget and my level of woodworking, spending more then $500 for a jointer. So for that the best I can find new seems to be the Grizzly. I'm sure the Rigid performs close, but it has no mobility or dust collection. Other then that, there isn't much out there unless I go used. Which, mind you, I'm not against but they are hard to find locally (NH).
Now, if somebody in the S. Maine, Northeastern MA, or coastal NH area has been itching to upgrade that 6" jointer for something bigger, let me know...;+}
-Jim.
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jtpr wrote:

As others have said, it's a pretty basic tool, sold by the pound.
As long as the castings are solid and have been machined correctly, you are in good shape.
A motor craps out, it is replaceable.
You want to buy the widest unit with the longest bed you can afford.
To that end, might want to look at this one from Grizzly.
T23046 6" x 55" Jointer.
Don't have a clue if it is a good unit, it just has the longest bed for a 6" machine.
Have fun.
Lew
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Yeah, I looked at that one. What is a "Parallelogram Bed"? I assume it's better because they emphasize it, but why?
-Jim
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jtpr wrote: ...

Mounting of the bed using set of linkage (configured as parallelogram to be able to be raised/lowered and be level) instead of the traditional dovetail gibbed rails.
Somewhat easier to raise/lower; little less liable for need to adjust over time owing to wear on gibs. But, for a home shop, the amount of usage is so unlikely to cause an discernible wear imo it's no real difference in practical sense.
Length is good, too, as it helps immeasurably w/ longer pieces in how easily one can keep/get a true joint.
--
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jtpr, wrote the following at or about 11/29/2010 3:33 PM:

Used is not all bad. Given my 'druthers, I'd just as soon pick up a nice used name brand machine that's 20-30 years old for which you can still obtain parts. Firstly, it's likely to be better constructed than the current stuff and unless abused, that generally means it's got a great life still ahead of it.
About twenty-seven years ago I was looking to get a bandsaw. I wound up picking up a well-used but not abused 14" Delta. Traced the lineage on it through Delta and found out it was six months older than I am and I'm crowding 65. Cleaned it up, put new tires and guides on it and away I went. It's still running like a top and from everything I've seen and heard, it's still a damn sight better than the current Delta stuff or even that which was current in the early 80's.
You can see the difference when you start pricing used, vintage equipment. Look at a Unisaw that's 20-30 years old and see what they're going for vs. the new stuff. There's a reason they hold their value and are in such demand.

Can't answer that as I don't have any Grizzly equipment in my shop. All my stationary stuff is vintage Delta, Jet, and Craftsman.
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snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net says...

The difference is that the Polar Bear Series is painted white.
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On Mon, 29 Nov 2010 15:23:32 -0600, Unquestionably Confused

One made in China, the other in India perhaps??
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On 11/29/2010 11:04 AM, jtpr wrote:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-46-Jointer-with-Mobile-Base-Polar-Bear-Series/G0452P
Except for aesthetic things like the power switch and the base, that jointer is virtually identical to the 6" Delta "Professional" model. A new Delta (with a separate mobile base, a feature that is built into the Grizzly) will cost you almost $200 more. I have the Delta 37-196 (current model number is 37-275) which I bought 8 or 10 years ago for about the same price you can get that Grizzly delivered to your door. It's a perfectly good machine, but if I had to do it again I would get an 8" model instead. If you think the 6" version would work for you I say go for it; that's a great price. I have several Grizzly machines and haven't had a single problem with any of them.
As far as the "Polar Bear" series goes, my conclusion is that any differences are completely aesthetic and negligible. I'm guessing that it's probably something as simple as Grizzly discovering they could save a bucketload of money by using white pigment in their powder coating instead of green (just imagine how much of that snot they go through!) and using magic marketing to sell us on the idea. I don't give a damn what color it is (well, maybe not PINK), as long as it works.
--
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On 11/29/10 8:44 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

I was thinking the same thing about the paint job.
Oh, and that switch? That would be the first thing I would knock off and move down. With it sticking up like an antenna, I can't roll it under my lumber shelf.
--

-MIKE-

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On 11/29/2010 8:55 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

The switch on my Delta is in a similar elevated position, though it's set back about 6" and not quite so "in your face". I can understand wanting to move it down (it's been in the way for me too on a few occasions), but in practice the location is quite handy.
--
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On 11/29/10 9:05 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Absolutely. If I had a Norm shop, I'd love it. Right now, I wish each of my tools folded up into a milk crate like a transformer robot.
--

-MIKE-

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On Mon, 29 Nov 2010 20:44:16 -0600, Steve Turner

And both are probably made in the same place, the Chinese Noodle and Machine Tool Factory. Way to go, Delter!

There's a subtle difference in weight, so I'm not sure what they left out or did differrently.
-- Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to risk life, to be needed. -- Storm Jameson
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