What type of Polyurethane for covering kitchen butcher block counter?

I intend to resurface our kitchen butcher block counter.
Since we don't tend to use it for direct food preparation or chopping, I am leaning towards polyurethaning it rather than coating it with oil or beeswax. My thinking is that since I won't be chopping on it, polyurethane will lead to a longer lasting surface without the need for regular recoating.
Question is what type of polyurethane? - Oil vs. Water based - Interior vs. Exterior (spar urethane) - Satin vs. Semigloss vs. Gloss - Any brand recommendations?
I am looking for a surface that is the most durable and will show the least wear-and-tear while still being safe for food surfaces.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
blueman wrote:

The toughest thing I've seen used on this kind of surface is a two-part epoxy coating that you pour on. Don't know if it would suit you, but it's like encasing the whole countertop in Lucite. Talk about durable.
If not, then I'd go for an acrylic lacquer or catalyzed lacquer. Very tough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used semi-gloss MinWax thinned 50:50 and shot on with a cup gun. I did lots of coats with light sanding between and it came out very well. They are bullet proof, nothing seems to hurt them. Just don't get in a hurry. Let each coat dry and work on a clean place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com writes:

What are the benefits of 50:50 dilution sprayed with cup gun vs. using unthinned either brushing on or using lambskin applicator?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
blueman wrote:

Consistency in coating thickness if you are used to spraying. Smoother texture, and best of all NO FIBERS when the applicator starts to come apart.
Build coats will be smoother with spraying as you will not be building on top of applicator strokes.
If you cannot spray, get yourself disposable short nap applicators. These work very well inside. Make sure you orient the nap to pull the finish rather than push it. Buy several and throw them away after each coat. If you use these applicators thin your poly a little to help application.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.