what type of Dado blade is recommened for a craftsman?

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I have a Craftsman Model 22104 and I purchased an adjustable dado blade, nothing fancy nothing to expensive. I put it on my saw but after the installment I noticed there was not much room for the washer and the nut. This dado has a 5/8 or 3/4 arbor setting, just a sleeve that fits inside the 3/4 hole for the 5/8 arbor. I just don't feel even a little safe putting it on with out the washer, yet there is only a bout 3 threads showing. Without the washer the blade turns with the nut on, it barely covers the sleeve. Are the craftsman ones thinner?
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That's only one of the many shortcomings of Crapsman tools. It isn't safe to install a dado set any thicker than the arbor will hold without full engagement on the nut threads. You can get around this with a thinner dado and multiple passes with spacer blocks on the fence. Keep your eyes open for a good used Delta or other brand name machine and dump that thing. You'll be amazed at the difference. Bugs
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Bugs wrote:

Obviously, you are totally unfamiliar with the Craftsman 22104,114,124 hybrid saws.
They are very good units indeed.
In fact, Delta is now selling more "crap" than just about anyone else.
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I hat a wobble-type dado blade? Measure of your "blade" where it fits on the arbor. A stacked blade set will be slightly less wide than the cut you choose (the carbide tips are a little wider than the saw plate).
Stacked sets are generally more pricey, but will cost more. I've been happy with my Freud.
-Steve
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Humm... I never thought of it that way.... :~)
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Leon wrote:

And I also heard that the pricey sets that cost more are also more expensive!
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Yes, but are they better?
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ks wrote:

Don't know.
I WILL say that I have a Forrest "Dado King" set that produces the best dadoes I've ever seen. Also, the blades are incredibly sharp. You can do yourself a major injury just putting it on the saw!
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Gus wrote:

Yeah, but how does it cut wood?
er
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Enoch Root wrote:

Even better than it cuts human flesh!
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And amongst the most pricey is the Freud Dial A Width set. $250, give or take, and produces dead flat bottoms and super sharp inside corners. Dead easy to set width once you figure out the system. Downside? Takes a pretty long arbor so it wont fit all saws.
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While not commenting on the Freud blade at all, at $250 you've got all the justification to spend that same amount of money on a good router that will do a much better and faster job on those dadoes- plus a lot more. Plus... you will have satisfied that primal urge, and dare I say perhaps even a Biblical mandate... that men continue to purchase tools to add to the toy box.... err, workshop.
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Huh? Router cut dadoes faster than dado-set? Not likely.
Dado set can slice out material enormously faster than router bit, almost without mechanical effort, relatively speaking.
Only advantage or router, if it can be accurately guided, is the precision of the resulting cut face.
(Not to be construed as statement that you don't need both!)
J
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When you consider the set up time, the time to change over the blades, etc. I doubt that the dado blade comes out enormously faster. I'll bet you... ummmmm.... something, that I can stick a bit in my router, set the depth, and throw a guide on the workpiece (assuming I don't just use my table and simply set the fence), and proceed to plow a dado faster than you can accomplish the same with your table saw. And... when I'm done, I don't have to change the blade over again, so I'm off to cutting the next piece while you're changing your saw over.
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On Fri, 23 Dec 2005 09:03:29 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Since I own eight routers, I went beyond that justification years ago.
I have to disagree with a router being faster and better, particularly when doing production work. Every once in a while there is a situation where the router is called for, but in general the tried and true method is best, every time. If we take four pieces of wood, each requiring eight dados, I can have them cut and go for coffee in the time it will take to just do the layout for cutting them with a router.
Toy box? Yours, maybe. Mine is a place of work.
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wrote:

How so, if you have to change over the saw? Once I put the bit in my router and set the depth of cut, all I have to do is set my fence for the proper spacing. You'd have to set your fence on a table saw as well. Now - I can agree that the saw will cut faster than the router and for a production shop that's certainly important, especially if you're doing a run on a particular piece, but for most folks in this group, we're not doing production work. I'd guess that it's more typical that we have to cut dados on a more occasional basis, and typically not 8 per piece. Most folks here would have to go through the complete change over process of the saw and that doesn't happen in less time than it takes to chuck a bit in a router.

Picky, picky, picky. Mine is not a place of work. That's why I hang out in a usenet newsgroup that is in the "rec" family.
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Beat me to it. :)

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Yeah and only one decent answer and he had to take all this abuse.
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I broke down and purchased a freud Diablo stacked blade at HD, as you said its pricey but I am sure it will be worth it. Only thing I don't like is the shims are not marked, good thing I have calipers from my Aircraft metal working days. Stephen M wrote:

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What can I say? Those who enjoy Crapsman tools are entitled to waller around in their ignorance. Most of the comments involved buying very expensive dado sets, not the capacity of the mandrel on the saw. I 'inherited' a barely used Crapsman dado set. The blades are .030" too wide and make a terrible cut. Anyone wants them, they are welcome for the cost of shipping. LOL Bugs
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