What Type Glue

I have a wall clock that fell off the wall and the door came apart at the corners. The corners where glued and the broke apart cleanly so not much damage to recover. What type glue should I use to reglue the corners?
Thanks Terry
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"Terry Kemmerer" writes:

If you use epoxy, it will never come apart again.
Buy one of those blister packed dispenser units on display at a hardware store.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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On Wed, 5 May 2004 16:00:07 -0400, "Terry Kemmerer"

the same glue it was glued with originally, assuming it has any value.
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Seeing how the clock was a retirement gift it would be kinda hard to know what type of glue was originally. used. <;)
wrote:

much
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On Fri, 7 May 2004 11:03:36 -0400, "Terry Kemmerer"

fair enough. it still stands, though that if the piece has any value, it should be repaired as closely as possible to the original. tests can determine what glue was used originally. the first thing to establish here is the vintage of this clock. was it new when you got it or is it an antique? I'll assume that you weren't given, say, a 10 year old clock as a retirement gift. if you aren't sure, please post pictures to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking.
if it's an antique, get help from a professional antiques restorer. don't even think of messing with it yourself unless you are one, which you aren't if you have to ask this question about glues.
if it's modern, but a good piece, see to it that the repair is done by someone qualified. depending on your skill level and what technical resources you have at hand, this might or might not be you.
if it has sentimental value only, and you think you would enjoy the project, by all means forge ahead. in this case, here are some things to consider: 1) if you use a glue like epoxy, the piece will not be able to be repaired again. next time you drop it, the wood will break instead of the joint releasing. 2)since the old glue broke cleanly without damaging the wood, your main task is to clean out the old glue and reassemble. 3) make sure you get all of the old glue out of there. many glues can be softened a bit to ease scraping. if the glue is a vinyl glue like elmers white glue or the yellow carpenter's glues, a drop or two of vinegar will help. 4) before you apply any glue to the newly scraped surfaces, practice the assembly dry. do it as many times as necessary until you are confident that you have all of the necessary items at hand and can complete the assembly in less time than the open time of the glue you are using. you will need clamps of the right size, something to apply the glue with and rags to clean up with, pads to keep the clamps from dinging your finished surfaces, a square to check the assembly, a flat surface to work on and lots of other stuff....
keep us up to date, eh?

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