What tool to use ?


I need to reach in between my floor joists and cut off the now rotten deck joists that were "sistered" to them. Problem is, I have a nice floor above and a nice ceiling below the joists which I don't want to open up. The front where a header/blocking would go is open though. What can I use to reach into the opening (10" high and 12" wide) to cut the buggers about 3" short of flush--leaving room for double blocking to support a ledger board?
Not enough room for a sawzall (unless they have them with a 90 degree neck) or a jigsaw. I was thinking of maybe a rotary cutter, but they have a hard time cutting all the way through a 2x8. Someone else must have solved this dilemma. Any ideas will be appreciated.
Cheers, Shawn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rima Neas wrote:

porter cable does make a recip saw with a rotating head. even with that it's hard to picture cutting off the sistered joist and leavng the main joist. not sure why you couldn't cut both off and insert a new rim though.
i guess before i rushed off and bought a fancy new tool, i'd consider avoiding that cut. why does the end of the sister have to go? can't you just leave it and have your blocking go in between?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is a saw that will cut in tight places, but it is not a woodworking tool, it's a medical tool for cutting bones and the like. As a past orthopedic PA, I became aware of its use for some wood-working jobs in very tight places. These operate by compressed air. Here is a link to one type of saw:
http://www.incisiontech.com/products/bone_saws_shaver_blades.html
Do a search for orthopedic bone cutting saws and you will find other companies that make these saws. I thought Midas Rex made these, also, but I didn't see any on their site. Ebay may have some used ones, but these are outrageously expensive.
Also, a cast cutting saw will work the same way and may be much cheaper. A cast cutting saw is also a reciprocating type saw. It usually has a circular teflon coated blade, but bone cutting type blades can be installed on it, allowing for getting into tight spaces for cutting. I have a used one (we had in our medical office) that we replaced because a bushing wore out (which I fixed). I have reason to use it, maybe, once a year. Twenty years ago a Stryker cast saw with vacuum attachment went for about $200.00. I see today (I just did a search) just the saw, new, is about $900.00. WOW, that's some difference! Maybe a used one can be found on Ebay for a reasonable price. I should go into business reparing broken ones. They are easy to fix, few moving parts, etc., but alas I'm retired, so.....
I dare say, I doubt if my post is encouraging for you, with these prices noted. Maybe there is a similar tool, for woodworking (that I am not familiar with), that is more cost effective.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

Many thanks to you and others for the suggestions... opened up whole new areas I had not thought of. I will go look at the PC and Fein tools immediately--the little LV chainsaw head for grinders looks good too.
To answer your question, the main floor joists are already cut far enough back and they do support an exterior wall, so I don't want to cut them further back. But I would like to cut the sistered joist further back to put in double blocking--floor joists are 2x10, sisters are only 2x8. The whole area is cantilevered out over the supporting wall, and I need good blocking and rim/header to support a deck ledger board. It is something of a mess really, the previous builders even used DougFir for the deck joists, which rotted out in short order... thanks again for your help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rima Neas wrote:

Take a look at a Fein Multimaster. I'm not clear on the geometry of your situation so can't say for sure that it's what you need, but worth a look. The "Precision E-cut" and "Standard E-Cut" blades have a 1-9/16 cutting depth and shouldn't have any trouble going through a 2x8--if they do you can finish up with the "Universal E-Cut" blade that can cut more than 2 inches. The circular and segment blades can only cut to 1-1/16 so can't go all the way through.
The overall length of the tool is a little over 10 inches excluding the cord and depending on what blade is installed, so it may fit into your space--the blades can be attached at an angle as well.
Personally I'd probably start the cut with the HSS segment blade, then cut through with the Standard E-Cut, and if it doesn't quite get deep enough finish with the Universal E-Cut. I think that would give a neater job than doing it all with the E-Cut.
If you're going to get one get the XL or the "Top" kit (a _lot_ cheaper than getting the tool and accessories separately) and add a pack of E-cut Precision or Standard blades. Coastal Tool <http://www.coastaltool.com had the XL at a very low price a while back--don't know if that sale is still on.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about one of those wood carving blades that fit a 4" grinder like: http://store.baileys-online.com/cgi-bin/baileys/1314
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/08/2006 3:54 AM, Rima Neas wrote:

How 'bout one of these?
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pB528&cat=1,130,43409,43424&ap=1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rima Neas wrote:

I'm still not entirely clear about how you're approaching these joists. if it's what I think, that the cantilevered deck has been removed and you're reaching through the band joist space from outside the building, I'd say remove the remainder of the joist the way it was installed. if it was nailed, lever it out with a crowbar. if it was bolted, get in there with a rachet and unscrew the bolts.
'course, I may be misunderstanding the situation entirely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.