What to use under ipe (ironwood, etc.)?

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wrote:

LOL ROTHFL I used to very often WAY WAY WAY WAY over plan or engineer like that. You really need to walk away and think about something else for a while at that point. I would like to see the Sliding DT though. ;~)
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http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Gluing_Ipe.html
On Tue, 9 Jun 2009 10:08:30 -0700 (PDT), dale martin

Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Interesting problem. I was going to suggest West System T88 epoxy instead of Gorilla glue because every test I have ever seen puts Gorilla at the bottom of the list of wood glues. If Tom is correct that ipe won't glue then this is a tough one.
I think whatever you do for internal post is OK, RW or PT, just minimize possibility of standing water at the base.
I think maybe epoxy and finish nails gunned into the post and to seal the edge miters. Another option would be to add some exposed fastners. Maybe square headed, hand forged lags like these http://www.blackbearforge.com/fasteners.htm . Not as clean of a look but can work well with the asian\craftsman look. I envision two rows up each face at maybe 18" vert spacing.
Another acceptable concept, instead of miters which can be hard to close in a wrap like this is to have one set of faces flush and the other set overhang by 1/4" or so in sort of an H pattern in cross section.

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"dale martin" wrote:
<snip>

Most over priced and under peckered adhesive you could choose IMHO.
You have a much better choice, thickened epoxy.
http://www.systemthree.com/p_st_quikfair.asp
Is one product. You are paying for convience; however, System 3 makes good stuff.
Just went over this with Tom Watson.
IPE is tough to bond; however, it is doable.
Rough up the IPE with some 40-60 grit on a ROS, then coat with laminating epoxy penetrating roughened surface.
Wait a few minutes, then apply fairing putty.
Wait 48 hours before trying to stress joint.
The secret is to get the laminating epoxy to lock into the IPE fibers, then have the fairing putty bond to the laminating resin.
BTW, strictly personal preference, but would not use pressure treated lumber in this application, at least not the crap I've seen.
Have fun.
Lew
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Untreated Ipe is reported to have a 50 year out door life expectancy, why not use it under itself?
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I would use dimensional ipe of 3 1/2" thickness for the 4x4 posts if it was available locally and not cost prohibitive. Since it's not then I'm trying to get the look of the ipe using what's available which is 3/4" thick ipe and PT or redwood.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Do you need the center? Wouldn't a box column of 1x ipe be plenty strong to carry the load? If not, how about a steel post, boxed in with the ipe?
--
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I would use dimensional ipe of 3 1/2" thickness for the 4x4 posts if it was available locally and not cost prohibitive. Since it's not then I'm trying to get the look of the ipe using what's available which is 3/4" thick ipe and PT or redwood.
Well there is that. LOL.
Have you considered galvanized chain link fence terminal posts and cover them with Ipe? Those are relatively cheap, don't warp, and don't rot.
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Around here (east coast mid-Atlantic USA) PT costs a fraction of what redwood does, if you can even find any. Since it's going to be hidden by the overlay, I'd go with the PT on cost basis alone. Plus, I have no experience with redwood in the ground, but IME PT posts far outlast cedar. (Note my experience based on the old CCA PT, not the newer stuff)
--
There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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