What to do with $2500

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I am in Broward. I will have to check that place out. You must be here to. SWFG member?
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Tue, Dec 7, 2004, 9:43pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (toller) says: I love it when people ask questions like this, and we have no idea what you intend on doing, or what your experience is.
The answer is very basic. They think we can read their minds; so why would they need to provide us with anything as mundane as pertinent details?
JOAT Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind dont matter, and those who matter dont mind. - Dr Seuss
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Hi Scott,
I would put in % terms regardless of actual budget, but your's is certainly adequate to start):
1. 10" table saw (30%) - $750 2. 14" band saw (25%) - $625 3. 6" jointer (25%) - $625 4. 12-13" planer (15%) - $375 5. 1.5 HP DC system (15%) - $375
A little over budget, but in woodworking, everything in "nominal" anyway.
Have fun!
Lou

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I would go see my local tool dealer and ask his advice. Tell him that you have a budget of $2500.00 and ask him to put a package together for you at the best price. $2500 is a nice order and I would have certainly worked with you getting you the most for your dollar. Tell your dealer what kind of woodworking you do and ask him his guidance. I believe you will come out better this way and plus you will build a nice working relationship with the dealer. Next time you are ready to buy, he will treat you right again. I would look at a Delta contractor saw with Biesemeyer fence, a 6" jointer( which ever manufacture that can give you the best $)and a Delta USA 14" bandsaw and a Delta 13" bench planer and a dust collector. Good luck and happy woodworking!! Mike from American Sycamore
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Tue, Dec 7, 2004, 11:41am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (ScottLindars) says: <snip> A craftmsan 10" table saw with a crappy fence and a burnt out 1HP motor. <snip>
You gonna just toss it? If so, I'd take it, if you're close. I'm just east of Raleigh, NC. A rebuilt motor, and it'd be a deffinite upgrade for me.
JOAT Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind dont matter, and those who matter dont mind. - Dr Seuss
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wrote:

I think what you buy is dependent on what you want to build. I started with a table saw, then got a planer and jointer in rapid sucession. Then a floor standing drill press. Some hand tools along the way.
Through it all, the projects I had skill and desire to build decided which tools I would buy.
I still have a Craftsman TS as you describe, except I put a Biesemeyer fence on it. And the motor isn't burnt out. That fence is the only thing that allowed me to keep that saw. It's a god send.
So assuming you build things as I do, I'd fix that saw, it's actually o.k., not great, o.k. A planer and jointer are high on my list. I started with a 6", but later bought a Delta DJ-20. If you like mortise & tenon joints, a hollow chisel mortiser is good to have. lots of outlets around the shop.
The ideas are not limited to any of that, it again goes back to what projects are in the pipe so to speak. Buy what you need, not what looks good when you show off to friends.
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wrote:

That's a decent chunk of change for some good tools- just make sure you set some aside for wood!
I'd get a decent table saw (in the shop you've got, it might not be a bad idea to get a contractor's saw rather than a megolithic cabinet saw), a bandsaw, a thickness planer, a bench grinder, a biscut cutter, a good set of chisels, a hand plane, and spend the rest (if you've got any left) on wood.

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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Prometheus wrote:

Just to voice a dissenting opinion... Contractor's saws are already pretty megolithic if you get any kind of good one, and if money and weight aren't factors, it seems to me a no brainer to go ahead and get real saw.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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The great thing about that Craftsman - it probably had "2 HP developed" before it burnt out.
Dave

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I too am into making furniture for the home. I would say that I'm a perhaps a a half dozen years ahead ofyou though.
My thoughts on the big tooling:
In the contractor's saw vs. Cabinet saw debate, I would say go for the cabinet saw. I would not make that recomendation to a newbie, but it sounds like you have been at this long enough (acquired a fair amount of tooling and dedicated shop space) to realize that this is a hobby that will not abandon. If that is the case, buy the cabinet saw and it will be your last.
Buying a new tablesaw is an easy choice as you really need to do something about your crapsman.
Hang onto the rest of your money. It takes time to set up and learn how to get the most out of a new tool. Stagger your purchases so that you don't have to fugure out the tuning and technique nuances of several machines at once.
If you want to get into rough-cut lumber. a planer and jointer should be close in the list.
I got by with just a planer for quite a while it works, but your stock will not be dead-on straight and flat. The unanticipated benefit of getting a jointer, was that all of my cuts were just a little but more accurate because I had dead-flat/square stock riding slolidly on the table saw top and fence. (including stock purchased presurfaced) It was suprising how jointing translated into a subtle but almost universal step up in quality (how tightly parts fit). I use jointed framing lumber (2by's) for all sorts of "doesn't have to be pretty" work. framing lumber is notoriously unstraight, but that is not a concern if it is jointed.
Bandssaws: I'm relatively new to them. I'm still feeling my way through it. I don't see resawing as a "hust-have" application for intermediate woodworking. You can resaw up to 6" with a table saw (3" from each side) in a pinch. However, if you *need* to cut curves in thick stock you want a bandsaw. Don't get me wrong, I really enjoy using my bandsaw, and it makes alot of things easier and more accurate, but thick curves is the only thing that I really could not find another way to accomplish. I would suggest waiting on the BS until the next windfall.
Smaller stuff: Simply buy it as you need it.
Cheers,
Steve
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wrote:

Since I work with wood for a living, I'd buy a big screen TV and a 12 pack.:)
Mike
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