What size screw can I use in 3/4" wood?

I have two pieces from a 1x4 to screw together. I wanted to know how to figure out what size screw to use and not split the wood. Thank you for any help.
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Total thickness 1.5", probably a #6 coarse drywall screw should work. 1.25" length should be available. By staying away from the ends and edges, no pre-drilling should be needed. Soft wood assumed and no appearance considerations specified.
On 18 Jul 2004 19:30:58 -0700, john_20_28 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jm) wrote:

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jm wrote...

You can use #6 x 1-1/4" screws for this. Without knowing your application, it's hard to say what kind of screw is best, but you'll probably be fine with just about anything, even drywall screws (the coarse ones). Sometimes these can be brittle, though. Real wood screws are stronger.
Avoid splitting by pre-drilling both boards. Drill through both pieces using the small bit, and then re-drill the outside board only with the large bit.
The small bit is whatever size the screw shank is. That's the threaded part of the screw, minus the threads. The large bit is the smallest size that will make a hole big enough to pass the screw threads through, but not the screw head.
Cheers!
Jim
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It's a birdhouse. Thanks for the information.
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jm wrote...

Oh! Then you are probably screwing through the face of one board into the end of another. If this is the case, a longer screw is better, 1-5/8" at least; even longer wouldn't hurt. Still pre-drill to avoid splitting.
Have fun!
Jim
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You should glue it together. Use Titebond 3, because I heard it's waterproof.
(G,D & R!)
Patriarch
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patriarch < wrote:

Especially if it is an underwater birdhouse for a penguin.
;-)
glen
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If it's ONE modest birdhouse, then screwing it together would be quite appropriate . Quite a nice project to do with a child. If it gets to be more copies of said birdhouse, glue and brad nails become less tedious. Just watch where you put the hand not holding the nailer.
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I usually use the galvanized "deck" version of "drywall screw" if it goes outside. I also have a bag of stainless ones if I really want it to last.
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jm wrote:

#6 x 1 1/4"     j4
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Without a pilot hole? Depends on the wood and how close to the edge. Certainly #8 dry wall type screws will work in soft woods.
Most people drill pilot holes to avoid splitting, which of course works with any diameter screw. There are tables that give the hole size to be used with soft woods and hard woods. Someone can probably name a site with the info.
jm wrote:

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On 18 Jul 2004 19:30:58 -0700, john_20_28 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jm) wrote:

This is assuming that the pieces are whole. If half-lapped, cut everything in half by size. It's all common sense.
A bit less than 1.5" should do, so 1 1/4"; less if recessed. Clamp and pre-drill if screws are wide [#10 vs #6] for strength. Keep clamped until screws are firm. Don't drive in too fast or firmly with a power driver, just good and snug will do, especially at the last turn or two. If a lot to do, and if not too certain, drive with a power driver and finish off the last few turns by hand. Some driver chucks can be pre-set to ease off when under load, so you could be safe enough there. The pre-drill bit should still give the screw some bite, so not too large there either. Try on scrap if necessary.
If carrying a load, or just for the Hell of it, glue also.
Bill.
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