what should be my first power tool?

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hi...
I'm just getting into wood working and was wondering if there is a stepwise list of tools to acquire. what tool do most people recommend buying first? a router? maybe a miter saw?
thank...
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On 03 Mar 2004 04:56:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Ah10201) wrote:

Skilsaw.
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Most folks I know would say a good tablesaw is the foundation of any good shop.
You have a myriad of choices but I recommend you get the best you can afford.
Buy a good one and you only cry once.
Rob

stepwise
a
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table saw. it's the heart of most folks ww shops.
dave
Ah10201 wrote:

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On 03 Mar 2004 04:56:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Ah10201) wrote:
|hi... | |I'm just getting into wood working and was wondering if there is a stepwise |list of tools to acquire. what tool do most people recommend buying first? a |router? maybe a miter saw?
It depends. If you are considering working with sheet goods, i.e. plywood, etc. then as most everybody will answer, you need a table saw.
Otherwise, a strong case can be made for a bandsaw for your first big power tool purchase. They are much safer, quieter, create less dust and turn less wood into sawdust. A good one is also a little less expensive than a good table saw.
If you are thinking portable power tool, then a good router would be my suggestion.
Recommended reading: Fine Woodworking Magazine. issue No. 153.
Wes
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I agree. For someone just getting started, a bandsaw is a useful and safe choice to start outfitting your shop.
An investment in basic hand tools (smoother, block, chisels, scrapers, hand saws, measuring and marking implements, files, rasps, bench/vises and some good books) could be the most useful to start. Not much can get accomplished in your shop without the use of handtools and some knowledge.
By the time you've set yourself up with quality hand tools, you'll definately be familiar with the term "budget" and "yes dear". By the time the "heavy iron" hits your shop floor, make sure you can breath through your ears! lol
Cheers and good luck!
aw
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wrote:

I know a neander who lists a band saw as his ONLY power tool.
Barry
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woodworking is a pretty broad area. what are you going to do? build birdhouses? cabinets? guitars? or just frame up a new room on your house? are you trying to fill a closet with tools or a shop?
a decent table saw is pretty expensive to buy 'just to get into' woodworking. so is a decent drill press. you might start with a router... lots of bang for buck there.
randy

stepwise
a
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Many would like to fill a closet with a shop. I remember seeing a pretty good woodworking book that showed closet-sized shops. Just can't remember the name.
:)

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ive seen some of those in time/life books. like a big transformer where everything folds out. biggest problem i see is you arent going to be working much with 4x8 sheets of plywood in your closet <g>
randy

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A used DeWalt Radial Arm Saw and a Porter Cable 690 router.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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If you expect to buy only a couple of power tools ever and build only the occasional project then I agree that RAS and router give you a broad versatility with low expense.
However if you expect to get serious (build cabinets, furniture, etc), then I suggest avoiding the RAS. As others have suggested, go with table saw and router first.
My RAS was ok for a while. I ripped, crosscut, mitered, beveled, drilled and routed with it (with drill chuck and router collet attachments). I made ok outdoor furniture and general stuff like adjustable garage shelving.
But I've regretted my RAS purchase ever since I've tried doing precision work. (I went to Sears to buy a table saw 10 years ago [before I knew not to] and was convinced by the Sears salesman that the RAS was more versatile). It's a pain to keep in adjustment, a pain to set up for each cut, and you can never get it to be as accurate as a good table saw with good fence. Like every tool that tries to do many things, it does none of them as well as other tools that do just one thing.
Michael
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[before I knew not to] and was convinced by the Sears salesman that the RAS was more versatile).
The sears RAS of that vintage is/was junk. A good used DeWalt is a superb RAS.

pain to set up for each cut, and you can never get it to be as accurate as a good table saw with good fence.
A used DeWalt is more accurate and doesn't lose adjustment.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Dangerous. Requires constant setup to remain accurate. Did I mention dangerous?
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you must be new here. Everyone here knows not to get into an argument with Rumpty about Remedial Arm Saws. Don't say I didn't warn ya!
dave
snipped-for-privacy@ehmail.com wrote:

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Of course they are dangerous. So aren't table saws, jointers. planers, bandsaws, router, grinders, hand grenades and thermonuclear devices.
When used properly the RAS is one of the safest tools in the shop. Certainly safer then the a table saw.unless you try to rip with it.. Even then it is no more dangerous then any other tool that is slinging sharp metal around.
I won't even address the constantly needing alignment other then to say it's been eight years since I last did an alignment on my Sears RAS it's still trucking along fine and in perfect alignment.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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On Wed, 3 Mar 2004 15:40:16 -0500, "Mike G"

Not to mention a utility knife.
Barry
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Ahh, those quiet moments in the shop at the end of the day when you shut down all the power tools and relax at the bench. Your left hand reaches for that piece of stock that needed just a little bit of trimming, your right hand for the 1/4" chisel. You sigh, your body relaxing, your mind going over what you are going to be doing in the shop tomorrow. Then it happens!
You've paid absolutely no attention to the stock and chisel in your hands and you've buried that nice sharp (If you are lucky) chisel a 1/4" into the ball of your thumb.
If you look really hard there is a moral in that story.
;-)
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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Mike G wrote:

Uh, that chisels are not your friend?!?
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On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 21:25:27 GMT, B a r r y

Did you read the subject line? A RAS is not a great first power tool.
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