what saw to buy

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I am looking at getting into woodworking as a new hobby. So I took a trip to Sears today to look at the tools. Is it OK to just get a table saw at first? The one I saw, had a mitre gauge on it also. I read someplace that said to get a circular saw first, then get other saws as you need. I realize there may not be just one saw to get, but what is the best for a beginner? I will start with some simple pieces of furniture, benches etc.. Nothing too complex. Looking for any advice. Thanks.
Larry
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Buy hand tools, you can get yourself completely outfitted for less money, you'll need them anyway, they are a whole lot safer and once you learn how to use them, you'll have a better idea how to use power tools.
With 4 handsaws ( crosscut, rip, fine rip backsaw, fine crosscut backsaw), 3 hand planes ( block, smoother, and jointer), 4 chisels, and a fretsaw you can take rough lumber to finished furniture.

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It makes me laugh when I think how long it would take to mill down some 6/4 maple for cabinet work with that setup! Especially when they come in rough sawn, twisted, warped, bowed, and cupped in 12 foot lengths. Those are the good ones. The bad ones are all that with crooks hehe.
Rich

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For a starter the Delta X5 looks like a good saw. A little on the high side, but it has a much superior fence than any Sears model, 5 year warranty and a bunch of extras. It should also hold it's value much better if you decide not to like ww and it's made in the US.
http://deltamachinery.com/index.asp?e 6&pG41
(Amazon.com product link shortened)86053197/sr=1-7/ref=sr_1_7/002-2760235-2392822?v=glance&s=home-garden

circular saw pretty easily, but if you start getting into tenons, half-laps, and dado's your going to want a table saw.
Hand tools are a great skill to have, but the learning curve is much higher. It takes a lot of practice and patients.
Larry wrote:

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My tablesaw was the first woodworking powertool I bought. I got my circular saw long before that, but not for woodworking (not serious anyway). FWIW Joe
P.S. Did you read this rec before posting any queries? There are a lot of anti Sears/Craftsman snobs on here.
--
A hobbyist / carpenter with an emphasis on small projects.



"Larry" < snipped-for-privacy@houston.rr.com> wrote in message
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The first stop, in my experience, should be at an adult education program, where you will have an opportunity to use their tools, and learn a goodly number of things that don't teach as well in magazines as in person. There also may be a number of reputable commercial facilities, as there are in the San Francisco Bay area. Or a woodworking club or two, where folks new to the hobby are welcome to visit or join.
These all have several things in common: You get started, safely, and relatively inexpensively. You learn how and where tools and project materials may be obtained, sometimes less expensively, and generally with the benefit of experience and advice from folks who have been there before. Often, someone will be upgrading, and have a tool to sell. Sadly, there are also shops being sold due to illness or the passing of the woodworker. (Such tools already have acquired a soul, in the lore of the wReck.)
Mostly, you meet in person a lot of people like yourself. Or, if you are lucky, nicer! ;-)
Patriarch
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On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 03:09:53 GMT, patriarch
[snip] | |The first stop, in my experience, should be at an adult education program, |where you will have an opportunity to use their tools, and learn a goodly |number of things that don't teach as well in magazines as in person. There |also may be a number of reputable commercial facilities, as there are in |the San Francisco Bay area. Or a woodworking club or two, where folks new |to the hobby are welcome to visit or join. | |These all have several things in common: You get started, safely, and |relatively inexpensively. You learn how and where tools and project |materials may be obtained, sometimes less expensively, and generally with |the benefit of experience and advice from folks who have been there before. |Often, someone will be upgrading, and have a tool to sell. Sadly, there |are also shops being sold due to illness or the passing of the woodworker. |(Such tools already have acquired a soul, in the lore of the wReck.) | |Mostly, you meet in person a lot of people like yourself. Or, if you are |lucky, nicer! ;-)
Excellent advice!
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Very good advise!! That is how my sister got started. She really learned a lot from the class and as he pointed out you find where to get good prices on wood and other contacts.
patriarch wrote:

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It's ok to buy any tool you want and, one way or another, a table saw will probably be on the list of must have's.
I have to say though that that kind of question scares me a bit every time it pops up, frequently, because of the questions left unasked.
Take a table saw for example. There can be so many factors that contribute to the selection of this relatively expensive investment. Things like budget and space.
What kind of table saw, bench top, contractors, cabinet, hybrid? Which will fit your needs, not use up so much of the budget you can't get the other things you will need, not take up so much room in whatever you have for shop space that you can't add other tools and/or leave you with no room to actually work in?
Woodworking isn't really, as much as some may like to think otherwise, a matter of tools, but rather a development of knowledge and skills.
It's nice to run out to the local tool/toy store and fondle all the goodies. You aren't alone there. We all do it, we all check out the catalogs when they come in and start to do a Pavlov when we see what the new latest greatest tool is.
Unfortunately, unless you have a budget that Bill Gates would envy, impulse buying is not something you really want to get into when it comes to your tools. Even "simple furniture" requires more in the way of tools the a saw. At it's simplest it will require equipment for measuring, clamping, sanding, shaping, finishing, etc..
That is not even touching on things that you should have at least a nodding acquaintance with. Things like appropriate joints, how to make them, what you need to make them, wood movment, how proper selection of joints figures in with wood movment, appropriate finishing, how to apply it, best way to apply it, and for all of the above, what options are available that will accomplish the tasks. Then there is the care and maintained of the tools you have.
I'm not trying to scare you off, it isn't rocket science. Window shop to your hearts content but before you start laying out big bucks do some study on the subject, take a course if the local adult ed place has one, find a mentor, read, build a library.
Tools can't think for you. You have to be able to make them do what you want. IE a table saw can't do anything a hand saw does it just makes it easier. It is still you that has to decide where to cut, what to cut, and why you have to make the cut.
Pick a simple project. Plan it on paper and try to figure out all the options you have in tools to accomplish the tasks required. There will be several. Finally, Try too arrive a realistic assessment of what to get in light of your budget and work space. Then spend the money, make some sawdust, and start to build you skills base.
Good luck.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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Larry It is your money and I can not tell you what to buy....
That said... Most of us accumulated circular saws, hammers drills, yada yada yada BEFORE we took the plunge into woodworking..(furniture, benches, etc)...
In my shop the Tablesaw is the most used powertool I own...and I own 2 of them... "enough" Said...
Not going to say anything bad about Sears tools... everyone else will tell you you are NUTS !
The advice about an adult education program really makes sence HOWEVER I never had the time to attend one plus I never knew of anyplace within 50 miles that offered one... so I just made every mistake in the world and learned from each and every one of them...
Only wish I could say I will never make another mistate...
Bob Griffiths
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Well what can I say? I was just a little partial to Sears since I worked there in high school. LOL But I was no hardware expert anyway. I was always under the impression that Craftsman made good stuff. But this is something that I will investigate before I buy anything. I think I will look to taking a class first before I buy any tools. Thanks for everyone's advice.
Larry

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wrote:

How long ago was high school? <G>
Barry
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Craftsman has always kept a great guarantee on their mechanics tools. They have not made the top-of-the-line power woodworking tools. If you visit a Sears store now you will find many brands in their tool section, Makita, DeWalt, etc. These are tool that are rated highly. You will not find the $1000 plus table saws. However I believe that you can find some saws that are very functional.
Dick

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You will

I ran into Sears last night to look at battery chargers and passed by the power tool section (slowly). I noticed they had a pretty good looking table saw for $999 or $949 with 10% off for using the Sears card. It was almost closing time so I didn't take much time but it appeared to have an enclosed cabinet, large numbers on the tilt angle gauge, an impressive miter gauge and a Biesemeyer fence. Didn't take time to look any closer but at first glance looked pretty good for under $900.00. Maybe they finally decided to offer something decent. I may take a closer look when I have more time.
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This must be it. Looks nice. I wouldn't kick one out of /my/ shop :) <http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.doBV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid922124000>
Best one for the money? Probably not, but it looks good from here...
They have two more on the site that are bigger...
-Mike
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net (Tom) wrote in message

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http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid921830000
That is the one I saw, which was on sale for $369. Is that a decent saw for a deal? or is it junk?
Larry

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After much consideration on features I wanted/needed, price, power, etc. I bought the new Craftsman saw #922124 with the Beismeyer fence. I did get the Craftsman Club 10% discount plus an additional "Today Only" 10% discount and free delivery to my home. For the money I spent I got a heck of a nice saw! I would take a good look at these new machines if you are in the market for a decent saw for a reasonable price. They are made well and have a lot of great features. The 922124 has the extended miter with clamp down and positive stops, the enclosed dust collection, solidcast iron wings, sturdy outfeed table and the Beis fence! A huge improvement over my old Craftsman saw! It's the pride of my shop now! MrMortise
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Dear Larry, The best advice I can give you is to buy the best table saw you can afford.There are many things to consider.You can spend as little as $100 and as much as $2000. Tony
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