What's up with LV forstner bits?

Page 1 of 2  

I thought the whole point of a forstner bit was that it would drill a non-through hole with a flat bottom? (Except for the brad point in the middle.)
I ordered a set of forstner bits from Lee Valley that came in today, and their chippers are about 10 - 12 degrees off of straight. My first thought was that, hey, maybe (probably!) LV knows a lot more about drilling angles than I do, and maybe somehow these will still drill a flat-bottomed hole.
Not even close...the hole has the obvious brad point "divot," and then the bottom slopes downward towards the rim by about 10 - 12 degrees.
Am I missing something here? Does anyone else have any experience with these bits?
Not only that, but the 1/2" bit didn't have a smooth rim...there was a decent-sized divot on it.
These bits are made in China, which I didn't know in advance or I certainly wouldn't have bought them. (Let's be fair...LV doesn't claim they're of US or Canadian origin.)
Lee Valley is a great outfit...I've bought enough of their products to say that unequivocally. But can anyone enlighten me on why these bits are "shaped" like this? Are anyone else's forstners shaped like this?
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Take them back. LV will either refund or replace them.
-- PDQ
--
| I thought the whole point of a forstner bit was that it would drill a | non-through hole with a flat bottom? (Except for the brad point in the | middle.) | | I ordered a set of forstner bits from Lee Valley that came in today, | and their chippers are about 10 - 12 degrees off of straight. My first | thought was that, hey, maybe (probably!) LV knows a lot more about | drilling angles than I do, and maybe somehow these will still drill a | flat-bottomed hole. | | Not even close...the hole has the obvious brad point "divot," and then | the bottom slopes downward towards the rim by about 10 - 12 degrees. | | Am I missing something here? Does anyone else have any experience with | these bits? | | Not only that, but the 1/2" bit didn't have a smooth rim...there was a | decent-sized divot on it. | | These bits are made in China, which I didn't know in advance or I | certainly wouldn't have bought them. (Let's be fair...LV doesn't claim | they're of US or Canadian origin.) | | Lee Valley is a great outfit...I've bought enough of their products to | say that unequivocally. But can anyone enlighten me on why these bits | are "shaped" like this? Are anyone else's forstners shaped like this? | | Thanks in advance. |
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Coincidentally, I just bought a set of these and they were fine. Flat bottom holes, smooth rims.
I'd take yours back and get them replaced.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have some of their Forstner bits and get flat bottomed holes (except the divot of course). I'd take them back and show them what's going on. Cheers, cc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

By forstner you do mean forstner and not the saw tooth bits, right. There are many look alike forstner bits that do not deliver the results of a true forstner bit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16/11/2005 11:34 PM, Leon wrote:

Indeed. The LV description of their sawtooth bits seems to indicate that they *won't* drill a completely-flat-bottomed hole:
"Both styles have slightly sloped chipping bevels so that bits ride a shallow cone of wood to keep them boring straight. Center brads can then be shorter, increasing bit versatility in thin material."
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pB245&cat=1,180,42240
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Payne wrote:

You're right, Doug...I didn't see that part. However, that may be because I was reading the other page on their forstner bits, where they specifically say, "The bit gives a cleanly cut, flat-bottomed hole ideal for plugging."
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pE533&cat=1,180,42240
Then even show a picture of a perfectly flat-bottomed hole as a feature.
Regardless, I don't know who the hell would knowingly buy a forstner bit that drilled a volcano-bottomed hole into a board, so these will go back.
This is the second time I've found an error in the specs/descriptions Lee Valley provides in their catalogue. On their low-angle block plane, they advertise the blade as being a 25-degree bevel. In reality, it's a 23-degree bevel with a 2-degree micro bevel. I found that out when I bought their MKII sharpening jig, only to find it didn't have a pre-set angle to sharpen their own blade. That certainly wasn't a big enough deal to warrant a return, but the volcano bits are going back.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, the page you linked to should perhaps say Forstner and Saw Toot bits rather than Forstner/Saw Tooth Bits. And the illustrations should differentiate between the two.

Some people don't care if the bottom is flat or not but would prefer the saw tooth design and the advantages that come with it. I literally drill thousands of 1-3/8" wide holes for Euro stile hinges. I am not too concerned with a flat bottom as the top of the hinge holds the hinge flat with the surface. I only need clean holes that are deep enough to accept the hinge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

^^^ ^^^^
Eh, you're sawing much to vigorously if that's happening.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| | Doug Payne wrote: | > | > Indeed. The LV description of their sawtooth bits seems to indicate that | > they *won't* drill a completely-flat-bottomed hole: | > | > "Both styles have slightly sloped chipping bevels so that bits ride a | > shallow cone of wood to keep them boring straight. Center brads can then | > be shorter, increasing bit versatility in thin material." | > | > http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=42245&cat=1,180,42240 | | You're right, Doug...I didn't see that part. However, that may be | because I was reading the other page on their forstner bits, where they | specifically say, "The bit gives a cleanly cut, flat-bottomed hole | ideal for plugging." | | http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=45533&cat=1,180,42240 | | Then even show a picture of a perfectly flat-bottomed hole as a | feature. | | Regardless, I don't know who the hell would knowingly buy a forstner | bit that drilled a volcano-bottomed hole into a board, so these will go | back. | | This is the second time I've found an error in the specs/descriptions | Lee Valley provides in their catalogue. On their low-angle block | plane, they advertise the blade as being a 25-degree bevel. In | reality, it's a 23-degree bevel with a 2-degree micro bevel. I found | that out when I bought their MKII sharpening jig, only to find it | didn't have a pre-set angle to sharpen their own blade. That certainly | wasn't a big enough deal to warrant a return, but the volcano bits are | going back. |
Is it possible that these pointy 'forstners' are for drilling dowel holes? <g> -- PDQ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I noticed this as well on the blade for the low-angle jack. The same is true for the higher-angle blade.
I was actually pleased as it made sharpening easier. I found a setting between the original blade bevel and the "nominal" bevel, and used that for my initial bevel. Since the original bevel is shallower, it means I don't have to remove as much metal.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17-Nov-2005, wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

While the page is a tad confusing, that paragraph is discussing Forstner bits. The Saw-tooth bits are discussed in the paragraph that follows and does not say anything about a flat-bottomed hole.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael Daly wrote:

While the saw tooth section doesn't specifically mention flat-bottomed holes, the pictures are pretty clear that the chippers on both of them are almost flat.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
These are some excellent bits, high speed steel saw tooth forstners made in China by Oldham: http://www.toolsforless.com/cgi-bin/ToolBig.pl?SKU S1016 (best price) http://www.oldham-usa.com/Products/BitsMain/HickoryKits/FBS1016pic.htm
I drilled 12 mortises in douglas fir, sizes including 1" (bit size) x 4-1/4" and 2-2/5", 7 to 9 dips and no sharpening needed yet. These are hard steel, definitely flat cutters and no volcanos.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might want to up your standards some what. I have a forstner bit set that I know that I have drilled over 1000 holes in Oak and MDF with a single 1-3/8" bit and it still cuts fine, with no resharpening. This is a 15+ year old set that I paid $79 from Trendlines, German steel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey, that's cool! glad you got the right deal. My point is realistic as a test and approval, however, and why pay that much for the LV bits if they are Chinese, if the Oldhams are as well, Chinese? You got a spare 40 bucks, pick up the set I recommend and test the shit out of them, OK? They are still hard HSS for the money, and just as Chinese.
Besides all that I realize the quality for price you express, and what you understand to be my shortcoming in understanding, but I am a new learner. See the sig?
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

test
I'd accept your argument on the condition that the company selling you the Chinese bits backed up the warranty of what they sell as well as LV does. Having that in mind is why LV usually gets my business.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah... Oldham gives a lifetime warrentee or guarentee, something goes wrong you send it in to them for a replacement. They have a free phone# to find out.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Leon, I can't seem to find anything on Trendlines...are they still in business?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did the research... "no" they're not. http://www.trend-lines.com/ was their site. I called all three 'phone numbers and they have all been recycled too.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.