what's this plane for?

I've had this plane in my chest for a few years now, never used it, but was looking at it on the weekend. It's a coffin type wooden plane, smoother size, iron is bedded at about 60 degrees and the iron is grooved on the top surface at about 1/8" intervals. My thought was end grain butcher blocks? What angle would I sharpen it at?
Thanks, Brian
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wrote:

A "toothing" plane, used to prepare a ground for veneering.
Also useful for planing unplaneable grain.
Sharpen to almost any angle, it's not critical. About 45° is typical.
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Brian wrote:

Use it for hogging curly maple. Violinmakers use toothed irons for carving backs to minimize tearout. Primo-grade Carpathian fiddleback maple ain't cheap.

Guess where the "block" in "block plane" came from.
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'Blocking in' is a term for the process of trimming small amounts of material from a piece that is just a bit too big. A block plane is the tool to use.
They are good for smoothing butcher blocks too.
I dunno which came first.
--

FF

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Check out http://www.lie-nielsen.com/faq.html?cart 6134542431441#10 for an explanation of toothed blades for scraper and smoother planes.
Preston

was
top
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wrote:

It is a toothing plane. One use, probably not the intended one, is for working down very thin strips of curly maple for lute staves. A normal plane would tear out because of the curl.
With a toothing plane you can rough up the surface, then scrape. Repeat until thin enough.
I have seen writing saying they are used to make a gluing surface. This doesn't make sense because glue joints are stronger if they fit without gaps.
Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a
MOM CASTS TOT IN CEMENT
Most experts voice cautious optimism
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--------------000509050707060000040305 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:

Actually I think toothing planes were indeed used for roughing up surfaces not only before glueing on veneers but also for joining massive wood. It was only two weeks ago that a professional craftsmen told me to use a toothing plane on oak panels after having straightened them on the joiner. This may make sense if you use traditional hide glue (I doubt whether with PVAc it is necessary). I only know about European continental planes but they have a much steeper angle, about 75 degrees or so (there are two beside my keyboard right now both made in Vienna in the twenties by Joh. Weiss). They are still produced so they must be still in use. Have a look at
http://www.feinewerkzeuge.de/divhob.htm
(text in German unfortunately).
--------------000509050707060000040305 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <title></title> </head> <body> <br> <br> Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite" cite=" snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com"> <pre wrap="">On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 14:50:25 -0400, "Brian" <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:brian.evans@mci%%%.com">&lt;brian.evans@mci%%%.com&gt;</a> wrote:
</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I've had this plane in my chest for a few years now, never used it, but was looking at it on the weekend. It's a coffin type wooden plane, smoother size, iron is bedded at about 60 degrees and the iron is grooved on the top surface at about 1/8" intervals. My thought was end grain butcher blocks? What angle would I sharpen it at?
</pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!---->It is a toothing plane. One use, probably not the intended one, is for working down very thin strips of curly maple for lute staves. A normal plane would tear out because of the curl.
With a toothing plane you can rough up the surface, then scrape. Repeat until thin enough.
I have seen writing saying they are used to make a gluing surface. This doesn't make sense because glue joints are stronger if they fit without gaps.
Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a
MOM CASTS TOT IN CEMENT
Most experts voice cautious optimism </pre> </blockquote> Actually I think toothing planes were indeed used for roughing up surfaces not only before glueing on veneers but also for joining massive wood. It was only two weeks ago that a professional craftsmen told me to use&nbsp; a toothing plane on oak panels after having straightened them on the joiner. This may make sense if you use traditional hide glue (I doubt whether with PVAc it is necessary).<br> I only know about European continental planes but they have a much steeper angle, about 75 degrees or so (there are two beside my keyboard right now both made in Vienna in the twenties by Joh. Weiss).<br> They are still produced so they must be still in use. Have a look at<br> <br> <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.feinewerkzeuge.de/divhob.htm ">http://www.feinewerkzeuge.de/divhob.htm </a><br> <br> (text in German unfortunately).<br> </body> </html>
--------------000509050707060000040305--
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