What's the best way to remove wet glue overflow from wood?

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Thanks to all..... I will follow all of your advice and wipe completely with a "wet" rag and then follow up with a dry rag.......
-Appreciate It!

fibers.
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And while I'm at it..... when clamping two pieces together..... should it be.... just snug.... tight..... really tight...... damn tight!

fibers.
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Tight enough to close any gaps but not so tight as to squeeze out all of the glue.
--
Al Reid

How will I know when I get there...
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buck wrote:

It should be just snug enogh to close the joint. If you have to use clamps to force the joint, then you need to take another look at the joinery.
When I glue up panels, I know I got the pressure right if the clamps are just barely loose when the piece has dried.
As for the original question -- I stopped wiping glue off with a wet/damp/sopping rag. If you let it set for 15-20 minutes, you can peel it right off with a plastic bread-bag tab.
Chuck Vance
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Snug. Too tight simply leaves imprints in your wood where the clamp was located. You want to see squeeze out and that is plenty.
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wrote:

I used to squeeze the sh*t out of everything... I'm surprised that there was any glue left in the joint!
I learned here that you dry clamp things first... it IS a PITA, but many things that you do in a hobby are.. lol If it doesn't dry clamp square and tight with gentle clamping, glue will NOT make it fit better...
"Don't drink and park. Accidents cause people"

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.... thanks for the dry clamp first idea.

together,
remove
remove
staining
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buck woke up at Thursday 14 October 2004 08:44 and had the following to say....:

I agree with the dry clamp idea. This also potentially points out any design flaws before you apply glue.
JAW
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well, that was kind of my point, JAW.. I guess I was a bit too subtle..
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What I do when I really want to make sure no glue shows it put painters tape on the joining edges, apply the glue, the runoff glue will get on the tape and some wood area, wait for the glue to bead, and then use a scraper/razor to remove it, then remove the tape!
Alittle extra work, but no glue marks!
~Kam (^8*

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wrote:

I've been getting good results with TB III by just following their instructions... I keep a roll of shop towels over the bench and pull one down and get it damp before gluing.. Also, after reading about it here, I got a few rolls of blue 3M masking tape and use it to "mask" the edges of the glue joint... saves a LOT of hassle!
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calmly ranted:

My fix: I DON'T STAIN.

Masking is the best bet by far. And keep the damp towels for your fingers, not the wood. Use a chisel or cabinet scraper on semi-hardened glue squeezout half an hour after the glueup. It comes right off and leaves no trace.
------------------------------------------- Stain and Poly are their own punishment http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Design =====================================================
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I had read that polyurethane glue would accept stain and not leave a white mark. I used Titebond poly glue. After drying, I scraped the squeeze out & sanded flush. While it's not as bad as yellow glue, it still left a telltale light colored area under my dark danish oil.
I'm curious what experience others have had with polyurethane glue.
Chris
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