What's the best way to remove wet glue overflow from wood?

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I will be using Titebond III and gluing two pieces of hardwood together, mahogany, oak, cherry etc. What I need is some opinions on how to remove the glue overflow. I have seen everything from using a damp rag to remove excess glue to people who say that it just pushes glue into the wood fibers. Some say let it dry and scrape it off..... I am afraid that any staining afterwards will show the glue line. Any ideas? -TIA
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If you are able to do the staining before you glue up, you're ahead of the game. Sometimes I have used painter's masking tape to cover areas subject to glue overflow and that helps. It's not perfect, but better than getting glue in the wood that then does not allow for proper staining. In some cases the "marker type" pens sold at most paint supply dealers can be used to cover up small areas where glue shows. GCS
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GCS..... I never thought about staining prior to gluing.... It just might work for this particular project. Thanks for the info.

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Masking tape over the areas the glue will squeeze out onto, then just remove the tape
John
On 13 Oct 2004 15:17:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (RESPITE95) wrote:

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MY TWO CENTS WORTH - What you have heard, including the previous post, is true to an extent. However, I usually do not stain prior to gluing, especially with slabs, table tops, etc.
I usually wipe THOROUGHLY with a wet rag (wet, not just damp). Idea is to get the surface around the joint good and wet, dilute the glue and get it off of the project. Then follow with a dry rag to remove the moisture and diluted glue. Yes, this will raise grain on some woods but not much if done quickly.
Invariably you will have some additional glue come up during the drying process - let that set and scrape it off gingerly with a sharp chisel. Occasionally if I do not get a lot of runout from the joint, I just let it set and scrape. Also, I am usually inclined to just scrape the bottom of a slab glue up because the glue is more likely to form drops than pool.
Another thing to keep in mind is cover your joined surfaces with glue but don't overglue. The jury is always out on applying glue to both surfaces, but good coverage of one surface is probably enough. Then clamp the pieces together until they are joined and quit tightening the clamps. Over clamping reduces the glue in your joint and adds to the mess.
All of this amounts to glue philosophy that usually gets modified when you are up to your wrists in glue and the phone rings.
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I often finish things that the panels in a raised panel door before assembly. YMMV

I'm there. I started off gluing up like Norm... Rivulets dripping down. I've since backed way off - a light but thorough coating that results in minimal squeeze out during clamping. I'm no glue chemist by any stretch, nor have I done "long term hold" tests - but so far I'm happy with this lighter approach.
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Yeah. I've noticed on recent programs that Norm is even backing off on glue use recommendations. Maybe Delta cut his budget.
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:) Well Delta is marketing a brad nailer now...
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patrick conroy woke up and had the following to say....:

Nails should never be in any cabinet where glue could be used.
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"JAW" Still not quite awake, blurted

That is just wrong. Are you going to glue in 1/4 round behind a pane of glass in a cabinet door. Sure you could glue the 1/4 round behind the glass and rebuild the door if the glass gets broken.
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Opinion. I don't believe they _all_ stink as my TI claimed, but his does have an elitist reek about it.

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Well I see your point - but there are plenty of places where a brad would be appropriate in a piece of furniture.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 07:05:22 GMT, "patrick conroy"

holes later, but his way is faster both in the process and the time you can go to the next step of the project..
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wrote:

So why is he called Abrams not Davis ?
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 13:03:46 +0100, Andy Dingley

huh? I missed something there, Andy... Abrams??
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wrote:

Ayone know a good way to remove hide glue smears from cat noses ?
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Herd them elsewhere?
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 13:04:27 +0100, Andy Dingley

problem usually is how to remove your shoe from a cats butt!!
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I have always use a very wet paper towel to get rid of squeeze out. Wipe several times turning the rag. Never have I ever had a problem with glue getting into the pores or grain of the wood. The wet rag will raise the grain but I very seldom sand before gluing. If you look at the directions on the Titebond III bottle you will find that the same technique is suggested.
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